Culture

Here’s Why Puerto Rico’s Baseball Success Is Causing Hair Stylists To Scramble

Sports fans have never been shy about  showing love for their favorite team.

BLEACHER REPORT / YOUTUBE

The Raider Nation is not to be trifled with.

As Puerto Rico’s baseball team has dominated the 2017 World Baseball Classic, fans are starting to notice much more than the team’s outstanding play.

WORLD BASEBALL CLASSIC 2017 / YOUTUBE

That’s how it’s done!

Fans have noticed that almost every player on the team is sporting bleached or partly-dyed hair.

Gladys L. Saumell/YOUTUBE

This has earned the Puerto Rican baseball team the nickname “The Bleach Boys.”

TOP ALL SPORTS / YOUTUBE

And this has caused a problem for barbers and stylists in Puerto Rico. No, it’s not that barbers are running out of Kid-N-Play style haircuts to give out.

HOUSE PARTY / NEW LINE CINEMA

There’s always a surplus of those.

So many fans in Puerto Rico want to lighten their hair for the cause that stylists are running short on bleach and dye.

TOP ALL SPORTS / YOUTUBE

Stylist Myrna Rios, who works in Puerto Rico’s Capital of San Juan, explained the problem to the Associated Press.

Ever since they began winning, this has not stopped. We have run out of the product in most of our stores.

Fans are even lightening their beards. That’s solidarity.

WORLD BASEBALL CLASSIC 2017 / YOUTUBE

Because of the product shortage, several dedicated fans have resorted to using wigs.

Gladys L. Saumell / YOUTUBE

We hope that’s a wig.

And while stylists are scrambling to meet demand, Puerto Rico’s team is excited by the hair-brained idea that’s united their fans.

運動狂熱 HighHeatSports / YOUTUBE

Infielder Carlos Correa told the Associated Press:

We have been able to unite our country with our blond hair. That’s what we want as players to unite our country, our people, and give them the best.

Be sure to check out Puerto Rico take on the U.S. in the championship game today.

READ: Puerto Rican Baseball Team Swear Up A Storm, Shouting Puñeta Live On TV After Victory

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Family Of Man Who Died From Taco Eating Contest Sue Fresno Grizzlies Owner

Entertainment

Family Of Man Who Died From Taco Eating Contest Sue Fresno Grizzlies Owner

Dana Hutchings, 41, entered a taco eating contest during a Fresno Grizzlies game in 2019. He choked and died during the contest and now his son has filed a lawsuit against the baseball team.

The son of a man who died from a taco eating contest is suing for wrongful death.

Dana Hutchings, 41, died after choking during a taco eating contest during a Fresno Grizzlies game. His son has filed a wrongful death lawsuit claiming that the event organizers were not equipped to host the event. Furthermore, the lawsuit claims that the organizers failed to provide a medical response team.

“People say all the time he knew what he was getting into, well clearly he didn’t,” Martin Taleisnik, an attorney representing Hutchings’ son, Marshall told CBS17.

Marshall and his attorney are pushing back at the notion that Dana should have known better.

People have sounded off on social media criticizing the family for filing the lawsuit. Yet, the family and their attorney are calling attention to the lack of information given to contestants.

“If you don’t know all the pitfalls, how can you truly be consenting and participating freely and voluntarily? It’s a risk that resulted in a major loss to Marshall,” Taleisnik told CBS17.

Dana’s family is seeking a monetary settlement from the Fresno Grizzlies owners.

The wrongful death lawsuit names Fresno Sports and Events as the responsible party. The lawsuit also notes that alcohol was made available to contestants and added to the likelihood of the tragedy.

“We are devastated to learn that the fan that received medical attention following an event at Tuesday evening’s game has passed away. The Fresno Grizzlies extend our heartfelt prayers and condolences to the family of Mr. Hutchings,” a statement from the Fresno Grizzlies read after the death in 2019. “The safety and security of our fans is our highest priority. We will work closely with local authorities and provide any helpful information that is requested.”

READ: Kobe Bryant’s Wrongful Death Lawsuit Has Tragically Been Moved To Federal Court Despite Vanessa Bryant’s Pleas

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Today, Puerto Rico Celebrates Emancipation Day–the Day When the Island Officially Abolished Slavery

Things That Matter

Today, Puerto Rico Celebrates Emancipation Day–the Day When the Island Officially Abolished Slavery

Photo via George W. Davis, Public Domain

Today, March 22nd marks Día de la Abolición de Esclavitud in Puerto Rico–the date that marks the emancipation of slaves in Puerto Rico. In Puerto Rico, enslaved peoples were emancipated in 1873–a full decade after the U.S. officially abolished slavery. But unlike the U.S. mainland, Puerto Rico celebrates today as an official holiday, where many businesses are closed.

The emancipation of Puerto Rican slaves was a very different process than the United States’. For one, the emancipation was gradual and over three years.

When the Spanish government abolished slavery in Puerto Rico 1873, enslaved men and women had to buy their freedom. The price was set by their “owners”. The way the emancipated slaves bought their freedom was through a process that was very similar to sharecropping in the post-war American south. Emancipated slaves farmed, sold goods, and worked in different trades to “buy” their freedom.

In the same Spanish edict that abolished slavery, slaves over the age of 60 were automatically freed. Enslaved children who were 5-years-old and under were also automatically freed.

Today, Black and mixed-race Puerto Ricans of Black descent make up a large part of Puerto Rico’s population.

The legacy of enslaved Black Puerto Ricans is a strong one. Unlike the United States, Puerto Rico doesn’t classify race in such black-and-white terms. Puerto Ricans are taught that everyone is a mixture of three groups of people: white Spanish colonizers, Black African slaves, and the indigenous Taíno population.

African influences on Puerto Rican culture is ubiquitous and is present in Puerto Rican music, cuisine, and even in the way that the island’s language evolved. And although experts estimate that up to 60% of Puerto Ricans have significant African ancestry, almost 76% of Puerto Ricans identified as white only in the latest census poll–a phenomenon that many sociologists have blamed on anti-blackness.

On Puerto Rico’s Día de la Abolición de Esclavitud, many people can’t help but notice that the island celebrates a day of freedom and independence when they are not really free themselves.

As the fight for Puerto Rican decolonization rages on, there is a bit of irony in the fact that Puerto Rico is one of the only American territories that officially celebrates the emancipation of slaves, when Puerto Rico is not emancipated from the United States. Yes, many Black Americans recognize Juneteenth (June 19th) as the official day to celebrate emancipation from slavery, but it is not an official government holiday.

Perhaps, Puerto Rico celebrates this historical day of freedom because they understand how important the freedom and independence is on a different level than mainland Americans do.

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