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Selena’s Día De Los Muertos Altar At The Mexic-Arte Museum Has All Of Her Favorite Things

This year, the Mexic-Arte Museum in Austin, Texas, is presenting an exhibit titled “Love to Death: Day of the Dead Community Altars.”

CREDIT: Image by Araceli Cruz

It features ofrendas (altars) created by members of the Austin community, and also some from its own permanent collection.

The Mexic-Arte Museum has been celebrating Día de los Muertos for the past 34 years.

CREDIT: Image by Araceli Cruz

The show features traditional altars and themed altars.

The museum also has a special exhibit on Frida Kahlo, so naturally, they have an altar just for her.

CREDIT: Image by Araceli Cruz

The Frida Kahlo exhibit (separate from the Day of the Dead exhibit) is called: “Diego & Frida: A Smile in the Middle of the Way.”

This altar celebrates the life of deceased pets.

CREDIT: Image by Araceli Cruz

I couldn’t help but think of the film “All Dogs Go to Heaven.” The uniqueness of this ofrenda is so cute, especially because each pet was constructed out of paper mache.

There’s also an altar paying tribute to street artists.

CREDIT: Image by Araceli Cruz

What’s most amazing about Day of the Dead is that there’s no wrong way to build an altar, and this one shows that. The street art itself is already stunning, so the mixture of tokens (like the ping pong paddles and journals) is what makes it a unique altar.

But there was one amazing altar that left me in tears. It’s called “Selena Forever,” and I almost fainted when I saw it.

Image by Araceli Cruz
Image by Araceli Cruz
Image by Araceli Cruz
Image by Araceli Cruz
Image by Araceli Cruz
Image by Araceli Cruz
Image by Araceli Cruz
Image by Araceli Cruz

The altar was created by Stephanie Sandoval, and the details show she is a true fan. She includes everything Selena loved, such as pizza, Coca-Cola, and Doritos. It also features her MAC lipstick, a setlist from her concert, and a sewing machine.

Here’s the altar in all its glory.

The exhibit is on display through November 26, 2017.

READ: Take This Quiz To Find Out How Much You Really Know About Día De Los Muertos

Let us know how you celebrated Day of the Dead. Tell us in the comments and hit the share button below! 

Meet Amparo Garrido, The Actress Whose Voice Everyone Has Mistaken For Frida Kahlo

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Meet Amparo Garrido, The Actress Whose Voice Everyone Has Mistaken For Frida Kahlo

This month, the Mexican government announced that it had discovered the first known audio recording of Frida Kahlo’s voice. But after multiple skeptics with ties to Kahlo, including relatives and former students, shared their doubts, it seems clear that the recording isn’t of the famed Mexican painter after all. However, the woman in the clip who was likely mistaken for Kahlo is somewhat of a hidden Mexican badass herself: Amparo Garrido.

A popular dubbing artist, Garrido played the voice of Snow White when Disney dubbed the 1937 classic film in the 1960s. The actress also voiced Bambi’s mother when it too was made for a Spanish audience and played several youthful characters on radio shows at the start of her career. In addition to her work in children’s films and programs, Garrido also worked on El Bachiller, a Mexican radio program in the 1950s. 

On June 13, a clip from El Bachiller was found by archivists from Televisa Radio’s who were digitizing and preserving a collection donated by the late Mexican broadcaster and screenwriter Álvaro Gálvez y Fuentes. In the recording, a voice believed to be Kahlo’s reads from the artist’s 1949 essay “Portrait of Diego,” where she describes her husband, muralist Diego Rivera. “He is a gigantic, immense child, with a friendly face and a sad gaze,” the woman reads.

Garrido, however, believes the voice is hers.

“When listening to this audio I remembered some things and I got excited because I did recognize myself,” she told El Universal.

Garrido was made aware of the recording from her son, who identified his mother’s voice as soon as he heard it.

“When I watched a television program, I heard a voice that I recognized as my mother’s, and in the program they said it was Frida Kahlo, which I thought was very strange, because I noticed that it was a voice of an actress or an announcer, that is, a studied voice, with nuances, ” her son Ismael Eduardo Larumbe added.

When he showed the recording to his brothers, they all agreed with him.

“They also told me that it was my mom. [The audio] is very much in time, form and circumstance when my mom recorded very often with El Bachiller, and her tone, coloratura and intention are practically the same,” he continued.

Larumbe said he is sure it’s not Kahlo’s voice in the recording because “it is a studied voice [and] there is no poet who reads his poems like a declaimer.”

Kahlo’s relatives and former students don’t think it’s the iconized painter, either. 

“As far as Kahlo family knows, there are no records of Frida’s voice,” they said in a statement, according to the Guardian.

Two of her art students, Arturo Estrada Hernández and Guillermo Monroy Becerril, also noted that the voice in the clip didn’t sound like that of their one-time teacher.

“The thing is, I don’t recognize the voice,” Becerril said. “The first time I met her, I noticed she was a woman with a very sweet, cheerful voice … Frida’s real voice was very lively, charming, and cheery. It wasn’t serious or smooth or delicate … it was crystal clear.”

It is also unlikely that Kahlo, who died in 1954, was well enough to voice the recording, which was broadcast the following year.

“That makes things difficult, because in 1954, she was in hospital practically the whole time. And besides, the voice is rather an affected one,” Larumbe said.

As more information surrounding the viral recording of one of the most famous painters of all time come forward, it seems less and less likely that the voice heard is that of Kahlo. But while archivists may not have discovered what they initially believed they did, they did shine a spotlight on another Mexican voice that many of us, who watched Spanish-language Disney classic films in our home countries, enjoyed growing up.

Read: Frida Kahlo’s Former Students Deny Claims That The Recording Thought To Be Her Voice Is Actually Hers

Frida Kahlo’s Former Students Deny Claims That The Recording Thought To Be Her Voice Is Actually Hers

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Frida Kahlo’s Former Students Deny Claims That The Recording Thought To Be Her Voice Is Actually Hers

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Earlier this month, the National Sound Library of Mexico announced they had discovered the only known recording of the artist’s voice. Media outlets and Kahlo fans around the world were ecstatic about the audio thought to have captured Kahlo reading a portion of her essay about her husband and fellow artist, Diego Rivera.

Now, the Mexican artist Frida Kahlo’s relatives and former students have come forward to dismiss claims that the discovered recording could be her voice.

Last week fans of the artist were enthused to find out last week that researchers in Mexico had discovered an audio recording of Frida Kahlo, but now people that knew her well are saying that voice in the recording is not her at all.

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“The thing is, I don’t recognize the voice,” Guillermo Monroy Becerril, a former student of Kahlo’s, told the Spanish news agency Efe. “The first time I met her, I noticed she was a woman with a very sweet, cheerful voice … Frida’s real voice was very lively, charming, and cheery. It wasn’t serious or smooth or delicate … it was crystal clear.”

Kahlo’s descendants have also questioned the origins of the recording.

In a statement, member’s of the artist’s family said: “As far as Kahlo family knows, there are no records of Frida’s voice.”

Another person is claiming the voice in that recording is her and not Kahlo.

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Mexican actress Amparo Garrido, who did the voice of Snow White in the 1960s for a dub recording in Spanish, said, according to The Guardian, “I feel it’s me and have for a while. I recorded various things for El Bachiller … I’m almost absolutely sure that I recorded this one.” Her daughter agrees, “I immediately heard the voice of my mother.”

The library researches who found the audio recording in the first place said they are still investigating the file to find out the origin.

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Why did we get our hopes up for nothing?!

The New York Times reports that the National Sound Library will meet with Garrido to see if her voice matches that of the Kahlo recording and will test out other voices from actresses in Mexico from that era as a process of elimination.

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