Culture

We Would’ve Liked More But Here Are The Latinos On TIME’s Most Influential of 2017 List

The yearly TIME “100 Most Influential People” list has been released, and as usual, it’s a little light on Latinos for our liking – only about 7 out of the 100 are Latino – even though we compromise an astonishing 55 million of the population in the U.S. as of 2014, according to the U.S. Census.

Among the Latino movers and shakers who made the list are athletes, singers and politicians. The coolest part of the list is that those chosen are written about by their peers, who themselves are influential in their industry.

Here are the 7 Latinos who made it to the list:


1. Demi Lovato, singer and activist, was written up by CEO and founder of The Huffington Post, Arianna Huffington.

2. Neymar, the international soccer star, had the honor of being written about by fellow footballer, David Beckham.

3. Tom Perez, the Democratic Party chair, was written up by former democratic Vice Presidential candidate, Tim Kane.

4. Juan Manuel Santos, President of Colombia, got a write up by Íngrid Betancourt, who survived kidnapping while running for president of Colombia herself in 2002.

Via: CandelaEstéreo / Youtube

Betancourt praised Santos’ ability to find common ground with adversaries by not seeing them as foes or enemies. She says he sees them as just people with whom you could reason and bring in to the conversation, instead of annoyances to be gotten rid of.

“Last year Santos received the Nobel Peace Prize for negotiating an end to the Colombian government’s 50-year war with FARC. And while I watched him accept it, I remembered the words he said to me back in 1992. Indeed he had been adding—bringing together friends and enemies to achieve what once seemed impossible: peace. I pray that we in Colombia will live up to his legacy.” Íngrid Betancourt for TIME


5. Jeanette Vizguerra, an undocumented advocate for immigration reform, was written up by film and TV star, and immigration activist, America Ferrera.

6. Thelma Aldana, Attorney General of Guatemala, was written about by José Carlos Ugaz, an attorney and chair of the anticorruption group Transparency International.

Credit: EL Chikilin y su Marimba Orquesta / Youtube

Ugaz says that Aldana set an example that the world should follow: that elected officials serve the people and corruption shouldn’t be tolerated at any level of government. He discusses how she lead the charge to follow a line of corruption that went all the way up the ladder and got the president impeached and arrested. Maybe the U.S. should consider hiring her. We might know a guy who needs investigating…

“As Attorney General of Guatemala, Aldana uncovered a corrupt network within its customs agency siphoning off millions and involving every level of government… The trail led all the way to President Otto Pérez Molina, who was impeached and arrested and is now facing trial for fraud… Aldana showed that the rule of law can defeat corruption—even when it stretches to the highest office in the land. It’s a lesson every country should remember.” – José Carlos Ugaz for TIME


7. Cindy Arlette Contreras Bautista, a Peruvian lawyer and domestic violence activist whose own case of domestic violence encouraged large protests in Peru, was written about by Susanna Schrobsdorff a columnist for TIME.

Credit: Carla Harada / Youtube

“We have to support ourselves, us women, we have to support each other.”

Schrobsdorff tells a harrowing tale of how Bautista’s private life became public after footage of her being dragged by an ex was circulated online. She spoke openly about it after outrage broke out when he was given only a slap on the wrist. Her speaking about it, encouraged others to do the same and to join a movement of anti-violence happening all over South America.

‘Her case—and her willingness to speak publicly about it—helped propel thousands of women onto the streets of Lima that summer to protest gender violence… This was how the women of Peru joined the wider Ni Una Menos (“Not One Less”) movement sweeping across Latin America… a phrase coined by Mexican activist Susana Chávez, who was killed in 2011 after demanding that unsolved murders of women in Juárez be investigated. Over six years on from Chávez’s death, women like Contreras continue to speak out—even when the pursuit of justice can have dire consequences.’ – Susanna Schrobsdorff for TIME


What do you think about the TIME 100 most influential? What Latinos should have made the cut for you?


[H/T] TIME 100: The Most Influential People of 2017

READ: Meet the Young Latinos that are Leaving a Footprint in Politics


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We Have Latinos To Thank For Some Of America’s Biggest And Strongest Businesses

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We Have Latinos To Thank For Some Of America’s Biggest And Strongest Businesses

Pamela Avila / mitú

Latinos may have given us Hot Cheetos and Zumba Fitness but there are so many more companies, products, and businesses that were created and influenced by Latinos as well.

In fact, a lot of successful American brands and products you love and use on a daily basis were in fact founded by Latinos. From beauty products, clothing brands, and Fortune 100 companies, the influence of Latino’s is endless.

According to a report from Fortune, 73 percent of senior executives in Fortune 500 companies are white. “The rest are 21 percent Asian, 3 percent Latino/a, 2 percent Black, 0.6 percent two or more races, 0.2 percent Native American and 0.1 percent Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander.”

While there’s still a long way to go in regards to the Latino community earning as much money as their white counterparts and holding positions of power within a company, we’ve rounded up 10 Latinos that have paved the way for future generations to thrive.

Check out these 9 companies and brands you didn’t know were influenced by Latinos.

1. Facebook

Latinos

CREDIT: Photographer: Nicky Loh for Bloomberg.com, December 6, 2017

Yes, you’re reading that right – Facebook was co-founded by a Latino.

Brazilian born entrepreneur and investor, Eduardo Luiz Saverin is one of the co-founders of Facebook and as of this year, he owns 53 million Facebook shares. According to Forbes, he has a net worth of $11.1 billion.

Currently, Saverin lives in Singapore after moving there to become a venture capitalist. He renounced his U.S. citizenship which might have been in part because he wanted to avoid paying taxes.

It’s also been reported that he had gotten into disputes with Mark Zuckerberg over shares of the Facebook company, according to Bloomberg.

All in all, however, we have the successful 36-year-old to thank for bringing us one of the most popular companies and social media networks.

2. Hot Cheetos

Hot Cheetos Inventor
CREDIT: Amazon / RPMontanez / Twitter

Of course, this is by far the best invention in the history of the humankind.

Without further ado, the mastermind behind the iconic red bag that has us lickin’ our fingers clean is Richard Montañez. You’ve probably heard this story before, but if you haven’t, here’s a little refresher: he worked as a janitor at a Frito-Lay plant for years before becoming the Executive Vice President of Multicultural Sales and Community Activation for PepsiCo.

Now, Montañez might finally be able to tell his story on the big screen. We can’t wait to sneak Hot Cheetos into that theatre.

3. Instagram

CREDIT: mikeyk / Instagram

Thirty two-year-old, Mike Krieger is a Brazilian entrepreneur and software engineer who co-founded Instagram along with 34-year-old Kevin Systrom.

Born in São Paulo, Brazil, Kriger moved to California in 2004 and attended Stanford University. That’s where he met Systrom as well. Six years later, the two co-founded one of the fastest-growing mobile apps.

According to Industry Leaders Magazine, within two years of Instagram’s launch, the social media platform was acquired by Facebook for $1 billion in 2012.

Now, Instagram is currently valued at $50 billion.

4. Zumba Fitness

latinos
CREDIT: zumbabeto / Instagram

The Colombian dancer and choreographer Alberto “Beto” Pérez created the fitness program Zumba in the 1990s. If you’ve never taken a class, you’ve probably heard of someone who’s done Zumba.

The aerobic and dance exercise is accompanied by music from various genres such as hip-hop, soca, samba, salsa, tango, flamenco, merengue, and mambo.

Zumba is a high-energy, fun, and kick-ass workout that involves martial arts moves, squats, lunges and other aerobic techniques.

So if you ever want to get some cardio in or simply polish up your dance moves, make sure to book a class ASAP.

5. Shazam

latinos
CREDIT: productivelives / shazam / Instagram

From 2010 to 2013, Mexican businessman Carlos Slim was ranked the richest person in the world by Forbes.

Slim is a Mexican business tycoon, engineer, investor and philanthropist. The 78-year-old has derived most of his fortune from his holdings and control in various Mexican companies through his conglomerate, Grupo Carso.

Mexico, however, isn’t where his influence begins or ends.

In July 2013, he invested $40 million in Shazam – the music recognition app – for an undisclosed share.

As of June of this year, Slim has been ranked the seventh-richest person in the world, according to Forbes.

6. Budweiser

latinos
CREDIT: corona / Instagram

Ever heard of Anheuser-Busch InBev? It is one of the world’s largest beverage and brewing companies.

If you’ve ever popped open a cold Budweiser, Corona, or Stella Artois then Anheuser-Busch InBev is where these beverages come from.

Anheuser-Busch InBev is based in Belgium but also has locations in São Paulo, New York City, London, Mexico City, and more.

Aside from brewing beverages that are popular in Latino households, one of AB InBev’s investors is Brazilian. Marcel Hermann Telles is a board member of the company and increased their equity by one billion dollars, according to Forbes.

7. Heinz

latino
CREDIT: heinz / Instagram

Born in Brazil, Carlos “Beto” Sicupira is a businessman and a partner in 3G Capital.

Most of his wealth, however, comes from his shares in Anheuser-Busch InBev – the world’s largest brewer – where he owns about 3 percent of stakes.

As a partner of 3G Capital, he also owns and has major stakes in companies and brands like Burger King, H.J. Heinz Company and Lojas Americanas.

8. New York Times

latinos
CREDIT: nyccallsyou / productivelives / Instagram

It’s no surprise that one of the richest men in the world, Carlos Slim, would make this list twice. It’s clear that his influence and mark in successful American brands and companies will continue to be.

The 78-year-old owns stakes in Mexican construction, mining, and real estate companies, and he also owns 17 percent of The New York Times. Mexico’s richest man acquired shares to The New York Times in 2015 and became the largest shareholder of the paper.

As of April of this year, Slim started to sell his New York Times stock and shares which lowered his stake in the company to about 15 percent. That’s still about 24 million in shares. Not too shabby.

9. Amazon

latinos
CREDIT: jeffbezos / Instagram

Amazon’s chief Jeff Bezos’s net worth is $149.3 billion.

He was also the first person to top $100 billion as number one on the Forbes list of World’s Billionaires.

You might be wondering why he’s on this list since Bezos was born in Albuquerque, New Mexico and raised in Houston, Texas. He was raised by Cuban engineer Miguel Bezos who arrived in Miami in 1962.

Jeff Bezos’s mother remarried Miguel Bezos after divorcing his biological father. Together, they raised the richest person in the world.


READ: Latino Veterans Who Are Changing The Game In Business

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Watch: Jorge Ramos Calls Out Mexican President at Time 100 Gala

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Watch: Jorge Ramos Calls Out Mexican President at Time 100 Gala

Bennett Raglin / Getty

Univision News anchor Jorge Ramos called out Mexican president Enrique Peña Nieto during his speech at the Time 100 Gala in New York. Ramos, one of the night’s honorees, also paid tribute to immigrants, journalists and DREAMers.

Credit: 1entrevistas / YouTube

During his impassioned speech, Ramos said: “Mr. Peña Nieto, buying homes from government contractors and then giving them millions of dollars in contracts – that’s corruption. That’s why so many people want your resignation and we’re not going to remain silent.”

READ: Dolores Huerta Prefers a Female President

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