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People Across The Internet Are Sharing Their Celebrations For La Virgen De Guadalupe

On December 12th, many families and communities come together to celebrate the patron saint of Mexico: La Virgen de Guadalupe (Our Lady of Guadalupe).

La Virgen de Guadalupe is said to have appeared to an indigenous man named Juan Diego (the man you see in images at the feet of La Virgen de Guadalupe). She asked him to have a church built in her name in the exact location where she stood: Tepeyac Hill. However, when Juan Diego spoke to his bishop about the apparition, the bishop did not believe him. It was then on December 12th that La Virgen appeared to Juan Diego again and told him to collect roses and carry them in his cloak. When Juan Diego took these roses to the bishop, an image of La Virgen de Guadalupe appeared on his garment. La Virgen de Guadalupe then became one of Mexico’s most celebrated religious and cultural symbols.

La Virgen de Guadalupe is celebrated every year on December 12th as a symbol of hope and faith in the Catholic religion.

If there’s one thing that indicates it’s El Día de La Virgen de Guadalupe, it’s the time you wake up in the morning.

While some people wake up very early on the morning of December 12th to celebrate La Virgen de Guadalupe, others begin celebrating the night before.

Since it’s tradition to sing “Las Mañanitas” to La Virgen in honor of her birthday, mariachi musicians prepare to perform late at night on December 11th or early in the morning on December 12th.

This celebration is a very busy time for all Mariachi groups.

In addition to music, La Virgen de Guadalupe is also celebrated with large altars that are decorated with dozens of roses.

Some flower shops even change their hours of operation for the day of this celebration.

Some of these altars are carried throughout the streets of different pueblos, as people walk, pray, and sing in her honor. Here is one from Oaxaca, Mexico:

A common chant you hear at these celebratory parades is “¡Que viva La Virgen de Guadalupe!”

In Mexico City, millions of people make pilgrimages to the Basílica de Santa María de Guadalupe, approaching the church on their knees.

CREDIT: Pedro Pardo / Getty

Although churches get overwhelmingly packed inside and out on this day…

In some churches, it gets so packed that there aren’t enough seats for everyone, which is why you see many people standing.

…the perks of live music and fresh pan dulce make waking up at 5am totally worth it.

This is what I loved about it as a kid.

The tradition of this celebration  continues to bring families and communities together every year.

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Even those who are no longer involved with the Catholic religion, are showing their appreciation for this patron saint.


Do you celebrate el día de La Virgen de Guadalupe? Tell us about your traditions in the comments below. 


READ: On Her 110th Birthday, San Francisco Will Be Celebrating The Artist’s Life And Work In A Big Way


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A Trans Latina Is Having Her Quinceanera Aired By HBO As A Docu-Series Exploring The Time Honored Tradition

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A Trans Latina Is Having Her Quinceanera Aired By HBO As A Docu-Series Exploring The Time Honored Tradition

HBO followed five Latinas during four quinces and this is what they got.

HBO and Mexican actress-singer Thalía teamed up to create “15: A Quinceañera Story,” a docu-series that shows the significance of the celebration across different Latino cultures. The four-part documentary, which airs on HBO on Dec. 19-22, will profile four quinceañeras with four very different stories. Here are the five young Latinas featured in the four-part documentary special.

1. Zoey

Zoey first caught the media’s attention last year with the release of a documentary about her life titled “Raising Zoey.” The film followed her story of acceptance as a transgender Latina living in south Los Angeles. In “15: A Quinceañera Story,” Zoey’s trans godmothers, who never got to have their own quinces, are able to partake in her special day. As the documentary shows, the trans women and Zoey having her own quince marks a change in the cultural acceptance of trans people in American and Latino society.

2. Rosi

Rosi, a Guatemalan-Cuban-American, is all about embracing all aspects of her identity. Rosi has to deal with political and international immigration laws in order to have her family attend her quince. The 15-year-old eventually has to move her quince abroad to Havana, Cuba because her grandfather’s visa to travel to the U.S. for the celebration gets denied.

3. Ashley

Ashley’s story is all about immigration and the current debate gripping the nation: her father has already been deported and her mother is a DACA recipient. Ashley, who lives in East Los Angeles, is also an amateur boxer whose first fight is scheduled very close to her quinceañera. To make things even more complicated, Ashley’s boxing coach is dealing with his own deportation proceedings.

4. Jackie and Nina

Jackie and Nina are best friends living in San Antonio. The two are avid escaramuza (rodeo) riders and are Mexican-Americans who are multiple generations deep in the United States. Jackie and Nina, who have been best friends all through childhood, want to enter womanhood together. Their love for each other and traditional Mexican horse riding leads the pair to have a joint quince centered on an escaramuza.


READ: This Quinceañera Theme Was So Legit, Even The Centerpieces Followed The Theme

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