Culture

A Classic Mexican Card Game Is Getting A Makeover That’s All About Women Empowerment

Courtesy of Valfré

For many Latinos, Lotería represents more than just a card game played at family parties and holiday gatherings. From it’s iconic card imagery – like la sirena y el borracho – to it’s impact on Latino representation, it has become a staple in the Latino household. It holds a special place in our hearts when it comes to bringing families and friends together. Yet for Ilse Valfré, an LA-based designer, the century-old game needed a face lift when it came to representing our experiences in 2018. That’s why Valfré has introduced her own version of Lotería with a female empowering take.

Ilse Valfré’s version of  Lotería cards feature female characters and objects with female pronouns.

CREDIT: Valfré

Valfré grew up in Mexico and one of her earliest memories there is winning a game of Lotería in kindergarten where the prize was a lollipop. It was small moments like this that stuck throughout her artistic career and paved the way for this release. The inspiration for the redesign came from a special place very dear to Valfré: her fans.

“They started asking for it as soon as I introduced the first Valfré Loteria artwork which was “La Sirena,” Valfré said. “I wanted to make sure to keep the original characteristics that we all know and love, while adding a little bit of me.”

The re-designed Lotería game had been a long time coming for Valfré who wanted to incorporate women-empowerment into Latino culture.

CREDIT: CREDIT: Valfré

Valfré is most known for her illustrated designs, which started off on her Tumblr blog and quickly gained a huge following. According to Valfré, her work represents a very “creative and wild-at-heart” look that doesn’t limit itself to one style. She has designed everything from dresses to greeting cards that represent woman-empowerment.

By updating the classic game, with her own designed female characters in place of the original designs, Valfré has given the beloved game a refreshed and millennial look. Cards like La Sirena are modeled after some of her previous work (cheeky, wide-eyed, hand-drawn doll characters) that many of her fans are accustomed to seeing.

This version of Lotería has a unique twist to it that feels new but still pays tribute to the original.

CREDIT: CREDIT: Valfré

Her version of Lotería features 56 cards while the original game comes with 54 cards. She added original cards like “el dry shampoo,” and “la space babe.” The reason for adding two extra cards came from her design team that couldn’t get rid of the two extra designs because they “loved them so much.”

 According to Valfré, re-designing work like this includes being able to mix humor into something everyone already loves.

CREDIT: CREDIT: Valfré

“A little nostalgia mixed with humor,” Valfré explains about her version of Lotería. “I wanted to make sure to keep the original characteristics that we all know and love, while adding a little bit of me. You have to be able to laugh at yourself, through trial and tribulations.”

Valfré says the response to the Lotería re-design has been “overwhelmingly positive” and appreciates the support she has gotten from fellow Latinos. She says creating work like this comes from a special place in her heart and hopes Latinos can appreciate her special take on this traditional card game.

“I was born and raised in Mexico and in our culture, color and humor are everywhere. This definitely came into play while building the brand and I enjoy incorporating that humor into my work,” Valfré said. “Using color throughout my artwork is just another way to share the vibrancy of my Latino culture, which I think is something that just comes naturally.”

You can purchase the Valfré Lotería game on her website, but only for a limited-edition release with 500 games available.


READ: A Millennial Guatemalan Artist Gave Lotería Cards The Millennial Treatment And They Are Hilarious

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A Mexican Graphic Designer Gave The Marvel Universe And Unexpected And Incredible Lotería Upgrade

Entertainment

A Mexican Graphic Designer Gave The Marvel Universe And Unexpected And Incredible Lotería Upgrade

Credit: luis.nunez07 / Instagram

In this edition of ‘take all my money,’ Luis Nuñez, 24, a graphic designer based in Mazatlán, Sinaloa Mexico has given us the gift of recreating Lotería to incorporate the heroes and villains of the Marvel Universe. Moviegoers who fell in love with Iron Man, Thor, Black Widow, and Groot get to see the characters in a whole light on Nuñez’s Instagram account (@luis.nunez07).

What started off with one image has ballooned to 18—and Nuñez has no plans to stop until the set is complete with all 54 titles. So far he’s finished 32 illustrations which he plans to unveil on his Instagram account in the weeks to come.

Which begs the question, where’s the link to his Etsy shop so we can buy our own set once it’s complete?

See the cards for yourself below. And if you haven’t seen the movie yet (what kind of fan are you?) prepare for spoilers and inside jokes ahead:

Nuñez kicked off his project with Ironman as el valiente.

Credit: luis.nunez07 / Instagram

Honestly, this is a solid choice here. He is one of the greatest characters in the Marvel universe. What a solid and engaging art project focused on one of the greatest superhero franchises in the world.

Don’t sleep on the details. A second image in the post includes a tighter focus on Tony’s own infinity gauntlet.

Credit: luis.nunez07 / Instagram

Iron Man kicked off the series and if you’ve watched the last installment, you know how the story ends. Tony Stark as el valiente is a fitting tribute. 

The hand that undid the Avengers.

Credit: luis.nunez07 / Instagram

The film starts where Thanos left off—in the aftermath of the devastating snap. If you know, you know. And if you don’t know, then you know because everyone is still talking about the movie.

The artist even gave us the answer to Thanos’s devastating hand.

Credit: luis.nunez07 / Instagram

But always a schemer, Iron Man constructs his own infinity gauntlet and outmaneuvers the psychopath.

Thor gets called out on his drinking problem.

Credit: luis.nunez07 / Instagram

The god of lightning had a rough go at the start of the film. He buried his pain with alcohol and had the beer belly to prove it.

Duh, of course Peter Parker is la araña.

Credit: luis.nunez07 / Instagram

Nuñez depicts Spider-Man with his enhanced super suit. He says each image takes him 30-60 minutes to complete.

And who could forget the heart-wrenching moment when Parker begins to crumble and turn to dust?

Credit: luis.nunez07 / Instagram

Clearly, Nuñez doesn’t want you to and provided this twofer when creating la araña.

Only the strongest Avenger can carry the world.

Credit: luis.nunez07 / Instagram

Nuñez is clearly team Hulk when it comes to the argument of who the strongest Avenger is. Thor might have something to say about this. 

All the feels with this throwback to Tony’s heart.

Credit: luis.nunez07 / Instagram

He knew this would fit so perfectly within the context of Lotería.

Who better to represent ‘the soldier’ than Captain America.

Credit: luis.nunez07 / Instagram

The second movie in the Captain America canon is called “Winter Soldier.” 

Of course, Thanos is the devil.

Credit: luis.nunez07 / Instagram

There’s no one better suited to embody el diablo than the man responsible for killing his daughter and wiping out half of Earth’s population.

When you’re as well-groomed and presentable as Doctor Strange (on teetering on being pretentious) El Catrin is the only card that makes sense.

Credit: luis.nunez07 / Instagram

It’s funny to see how well the Marvel characters fit into la Lotería. Doctor Strange begins with a shot of his fancy clothes and accessories. He never loses his flair for appearances as evident by his high-neck flowing cape. 

Black Widow is the obvious choice for the lady card.

Credit: luis.nunez07 / Instagram

The franchise needed more women in it. No secret there.

Guardians of the Galaxy was defined by its soundtrack. Peter Quill wearing his Walkman makes the perfect musico.

Credit: luis.nunez07 / Instagram

Music was Peter Quill. Who could forget the ’60s and the ’70s soundtrack that included Hooked on a Feeling and all his out of tune singing?

Teenage Groot still has some years to go before growing into a tree.

Credit: luis.nunez07 / Instagram

Adult Groot sacrificed himself for the Guardians. When we see him again, he’s a mere sapling but well on his way to growing into a sturdy arbol.

Clint Barton, complete with his f*ckboi haircut, is El Apache.

Credit: luis.nunez07 / Instagram

Hawkeye might not be Native American, but with a bow and arrow in hand, he has an eerie resemblance to the original image of el apache.

El Gorrito gets a massive metal make-over. 

Credit: luis.nunez07 / Instagram

No frill bonnet to be seen here. El Gorrito has redesigned to include Thor’s comic book version of his helmet, which makes a brief cameo during Ragnarok. 

Groot’s home gets a shout-out.

Credit: luis.nunez07 / Instagram

Baby Groot was a fan favorite. It’s only right he make an appearance in the flower pot card.

Why Red Skull was the keeper of the Soul Stone still feels like a mystery but at least it makes sense here.

Credit: luis.nunez07 / Instagram

The skull with crossbones has been swapped out for the Hydra symbol with Red Skull sitting at its center.

Falcon may fit the pajaro card perfectly at the start of Endgame…

Credit: luis.nunez07 / Instagram

…But by the end of it, he’s received a major upgrade. We might be looking at the new face of the Captain America canon here folks.

Only royalty wears a crown…

Credit: luis.nunez07 / Instagram

…So it’s appropriate for King T’Challa’s Black Panther to take la corona.

Keep an eye Nuñez’s Instagram account (@luis.nunez07) for the remaining 36 illustrations. 

READ: Marvel Is Bringing More LGBTQ Characters To The Universe

Robert Clemente’s Jersey Number Hasn’t Been Retired But Latino Players Don’t Wear It Out Of Respect

Entertainment

Robert Clemente’s Jersey Number Hasn’t Been Retired But Latino Players Don’t Wear It Out Of Respect

davidsantos8416 / Instagram / Bacalao con Papa

Few players have gained the respect and iconic status in baseball like Roberto Clemente have. A 15-time All-Star, 12-time Gold Glove Award winner, two-time World Series champion for the Pittsburgh Pirates and a member of the 3,000-hit club, Clemente has a resume that few can match. Unfortunately, Clemente died in a plane crash on Dec. 31, 1972, while helping with earthquake relief from his home of Puerto Rico to Nicaragua. A year later he became the first player from Latin America inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame. These reasons alone have made Clemente a legend to so many Latino baseball players. It’s also why so many have refused to ever put on his No. 21 ever again out of respect to Clemente.

Jackie Robinson’s No. 42 is the only jersey number retired across baseball, but many Latino players want Clemente’s jersey to get the same honor.

As well as being great on the field, Clemente was an even better person off of it. He was a huge advocate for Latino players and fought against Jim Crow laws during his era. That advocacy is not lost on players today.

This is why the No. 21 has become, in many ways, a “sacred number” in baseball, especially to Puerto Rican players. According to Baseball Reference, out of the 235 Puerto Rico-born players who have appeared in an MLB game since Clemente’s death 47 years ago, only 16 have used the No. 21 — and none in the past five years.

While Jackie Robinson’s No. 42 is retired and celebrated every April 15th, many think the same should happen with Clemente. Coincidentally, Clemente debuted just two days after Robinson did on April 17, 1955.

“His body of work speaks volumes, so I do think that, as Jackie Robinson represents greatness in baseball and so much more, so does Roberto Clemente, particularly for Latinos all over the world,” Puerto Rico Gov. Ricardo A. Rosselló said at an event last year honoring Clemente. “So I think it’s the right time to retire No. 21.”

While it’s been more 40 years since Clemente’s death, many feel now is a great time to honor him.

Latinos have become a growing force in the major leagues and now make up 30 percent of all baseball players. With this growing presence, many feel now is the right time to make Clemente’s jersey retire across baseball.

Despite multiple campaigns and calls for the retirement of the number, there has been little change on the subject. Baseball Commissioner Rob Manfred has resisted the idea of retiring the number. He says the league already honors his legacy with the Roberto Clemente Award, given annually to a player who demonstrates the values that Clemente displayed in his community.

While the No. 21 may not be officially retired, Latino baseball players have in their own special way.

While the Pirates are the only team to have officially retired Clemente’s jersey number, players have chosen to honor him in a different way: by choosing not to wear it all together.

Luis Clemente, the son of Roberto Clemente, has a different idea on honoring his father. He has called for not only a number retirement but a patch on the jersey or hat to be worn by the previous year’s Clemente Award winner. While he hasn’t had official talks with MLB about the proposal, there’s no doubt it would receive support among many Latino players.

“No Puerto Ricans will use the number because of Roberto Clemente,” Houston Astros shortstop, Carlos Correa, 24, told the New York Times. “The way I see it: Roberto Clemente is a figure for Latinos just like Jackie Robinson was for African-Americans. Clemente didn’t just break barriers but inspired other Latinos to get into baseball.”

READ: Trump Put A Stop To The MLB And Cuban Baseball Federation Deal And Here’s Why It Matters

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