Culture

26 Signs You Grew Up Puerto Rican AF

mjulio777pr / Twitter

Whether you grew up in the home isla, Miami or Alaska, when you grow up Puerto Rican, we might as well be from the same family. TBH, we’re probably cousins.

Have a healthy fear of your mom’s moods? Puerto Rican. Can you dance merengue and eat it, too? Puerto Rican. I could go on.

1. Saying hi to your family at every holiday.

puerto rican
CREDIT: @GenericName76 / Twitter

Be prepared to be greeted with open arms, all the hugs and kisses on each cheek. You have 147 cousins, so the parties go on till the morning.

2. You don’t play dominoes.

CREDIT: @mjulio777pr / Twitter

You compete at longanas, and you expect your mom to cheat or make up a new rule halfway through. You also have a sneaking suspicion that your abuelita is an evil genius who could win every time but is an actual angel so she lets someone else win.

3. You had a janky Barney at your party.

CREDIT: @nicole.allyn_ / Instagram

And your parents swear you had a good time, but the home videos prove otherwise. The only thing I was caught saying on video was, “Barney sucio.”

4. You had this bracelet with your name on it.

CREDIT: @the_notorious_idv / Twitter

It’s how they kept track of all us screaming Latino kids on the playground. This is practical AF and the tradition will live on, IMO.

5. You had your ears pierced when you were 5 seconds old.

CREDIT: @thelacquerhouse / Twitter

I swear there is not a single photo of me without gold studs. Does Miami-Dade hospital have an infant ear piercer on call?

6. You also started drinking café con leche when you were an infant.

CREDIT: “Cuba cafe con leche with crackers” Digital Image. Best Cuba Guide. 29 May 2018.

And it was all about soaking the cracker for as long as you could without it falling to the bottom.

7. You know who el Cuco is but have no idea what they look like.

CREDIT: Untitled. Digital Image. Wikipedia. 30 May 2018.

Is she an alligator or a boogeyman? IDK, except for that she’s always watching to see if I’m behaving, and if I don’t, she’s going to eat me. Growing up Puerto Rican means growing up scared… like all the time.

8. Chancletas were child’s play.

CREDIT: @Qsportsm / Twitter

The most terrifying phrase, “Do you want the belt?” We all give our mom’s shit for it at Christmas but low key, I don’t own a belt.

9. Marc Anthony and J.Lo were also your parents.

CREDIT: “Image: File photo of Marc Anthony and wife Jennifer Lopez arriving at the Metropolitan Museum of Art Costume Institute Benefit in New York” Digital Image. Today. 30 May 2018.

When they split up, it was a global life event for every Puerto Rican on the Earth. You remember your mom or tia crying and questioning their own marriages if the Puerto Rican Royalty couldn’t make it.

10. You know not to leave a single fork in the sink.

“Nadie me alman.” “If you loved me, you wouldn’t disrespect me like this.” “No, now I know how you really think of me.”

For real, we all started mothering our mothers when we were children. Including my own mom con su mama.

11. The Cuban Mop is universally accepted as the only way to clean a house.

CREDIT: @tinaaxox1 / Twitter

When I moved out and bought a steam mop, my mom flipped her shit. “Nothing works as well as the Cuban mop, Dani, c’mon.” Spoiler: she admitted that she likes the steam mop now. But she’ll never buy one when she has a perfectly good Cuban mop.

12. All your pots and pans were in the oven.

CREDIT: @miastasha / Twitter

And cutting boards, and strainers, and basically anything that could fit. It’s fine though because you pretty much fried all your food.

13. Like bacalítos y croquetas.

CREDIT: @franexla / Instagram

There is nada ni nadie as comforting as a lime-doused codfish fritter with jamón croquetas. Oh, and you know not to ever turn down a second helping of arroz con gandules or any other food or risk deeply offending your mother.

14. You don’t need an oven because you roasted the pig outside.

CREDIT: @latintouchproducts / Instagram

He’s going to have arroz con frijoles stuffed up his culo and you’re going to eat it, entiende?

15. You can’t remember not drinking coqui at the holidays.

CREDIT: @pietri_dish / Instagram

Your earliest memory is when you were 6 years old and the family watched you for your reaction and then exploded with, “ayyyy” when you pretended to like the taste of rum. Puerto Ricans don’t follow silly American laws.

16. You know not to even whisper “mofongo” unless it is immediately available.

CREDIT: @fulanathefoodie / Instagram

Or risk getting slapped upside the head for teasing your mother. Then, you’ll have to comfort them while they throw a tantrum for trying to make fools out of them.

17. Everything tastes like the Pickapeppa brown sauce.

CREDIT: Untitled. Digital Image. Pickapeppa. 29 May 2018.

It’s her not-so-secret sauce for arroz con habichuelas, pot roast, picadillo, todo y todo. At least, if you’re from Miami and your boricua mom married a Jamaican. 😛 Either way, there was mango in your food.

18. One shelf of your fridge was dedicated to homemade sofrito.

CREDIT: @izzy_money85 / Instagram

Your mom made this in bulk because this was your actual base for all your food. I grew up in Miami, so the ajices dulces and culantro were easy to pick up but since moving, it’s still rico without it.

19. Vienna sausages were life.

CREDIT: @14mangualv / Twitter

If your mom could open a can and make it into a pot before me or my brothers could eat them straight from the can, it was a win. Weekend mornings were the best because you knew you were getting some sautéed sausages and leftover crispy rice for breakfast.

20. Another favorite breakfast food was arroz con huevo frito.

CREDIT: @foodyatheart1

As kids, this was the No. 1 ultimate comfort food. The yolk would run through all the white rice and then we felt fancy for having arroz amarillo. 💅

21. We cannot forget the “Egg in the Hole” brekkie.

CREDIT: @fredsabbag / Instagram

A buttered crispy toast and egg all in one?! I honestly don’t know which one is more satisfying because they were equally as exciting as kids.

22. You probably had at least two of these in your house.

CREDIT: @miss__imperfectly_perfect / Instagram

Don’t call it a mortar and pestle, because it’s just not. It’s a pilón and the plantain-based food that must not be named is served in it. I’m upsetting myself just thinking about it.

23. These merengue cookies were everywhere.

CREDIT: @kevinqcarmona / Twitter

You had to buy a box of merengue every day for a family of five, but this giant tin of cookies felt bottomless, y gracias a Dios por eso. Oh, and nobody speaks Spanish or English. It’s Spanglish, mami.

24. You also had an emergency stock of banana peppers.

CREDIT: Untitled. Digital Image. Seasons. 29 May 2018.

Your pantry was ready for the next hurricane at all times. Twelve jars of vienna sausages and at least six jars of banana peppers. Isn’t the rule for emergencies to have a week’s supply? 👅

25. You were shocked to find masa in tamales after growing up with pasteles puertoriqueño.

CREDIT: @katycorn87 / Instagram

Made from yucca, olives and, of course, sofrito, and wrapped in a boiled banana leaf, these have a totally different flavor than Mexican tamales. When you brought them to your white school and friends asked if you were Mexican, you were also afraid your face would freeze in an eye roll. It’s what your mamma taught you.

26. Your abuelita slayed at making flan.

CREDIT: @el_chalet_express / Instagram

Every time we went over, she had flan for us and even though we were stuffed from being forced to eat two full plates of picadillo, a jar of banana peppers, and arroz con habichuelas, we eagerly ate up the flan. When you’re Puerto Rican, there’s always room for dessert. 🇵🇷

The Governor Of Puerto Rico Was Caught In A Chat Using Grotesque Homophobic And Sexist Language And The Entire Island Is Calling Him To Resign In Massive Protests

Entertainment

The Governor Of Puerto Rico Was Caught In A Chat Using Grotesque Homophobic And Sexist Language And The Entire Island Is Calling Him To Resign In Massive Protests

Raul Colon - Photographer, Web Developer, Activist / Facebook

Over the last week, Puerto Rico has been hit with multiple political scandals that have motivated thousands of people on the island and in the diaspora to protest. Puerto Ricans are calling for the resignation of its governor, its fiscal control board and, for a growing sum, its colonial ties to the United States. A lot of the unrest stems from recent private messages released that showed the governor using offensive language against women, the LGBTQ+ community, and Hurricane Maria Victims.

Puerto Rico is being rocked with a growing political scandal.

Credit: @IsabelSDieppa / Twitter

On Wednesday, the FBI arrested former Education Secretary Julia Keleher, former Puerto Rico Health Insurance Administration head Angela Avila-Marrero, businessmen Fernando Scherrer-Caillet and Alberto Velazquez-Piñol, and education contractors Glenda E. Ponce-Mendoza and Mayra Ponce-Mendoza, who are sisters, on 32 counts of fraud and related charges.

The streets were filled with people demanding that the governor resign facing corruptions and damning messages leaked to the public.

Credit: @flores_0h / Twitter

The corruption scheme, which ushered federal money to unqualified, politically connected contractors, involves $15.5 million in federal funding between 2017 and 2019. Of that, 13 million was spent by the Department of Education during Keleher’s time as secretary. During her two-year term, Keleher, an Italian-American educational leader from Philadelphia, was criticized by the people of Puerto Rico for closing down hundreds of schools and implementing the island’s first charter school. The additional $2.5 million was spent by the insurance administration when Avila was the director.

The governor was caught in a chat using grotesque homophobic and sexist language.

Just days later, on Saturday, the island experienced another political blow: Puerto Rico’s Center for Investigative Journalism published 889 pages of Gov. Ricardo Rosselló’s private Telegram chat. The secret messages, between him and several of his aides, included profanity-laced, and at times misogynistic, homophobic and violent, comments and memes about several high-profile women politicians, celebrities, the press and even the victims of Hurricane María.

Puerto Rico-born former New York city council speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito is one person the governor attacked.

Credit: @MMViverito / Twitter

“All of my solidarity with my friend @CarmenYulinCruz for the unacceptable attacks by @ricardorossello,” Mark-Viverito tweeted. “The women are not ‘b*tches’ nor ‘sons of b*tches,’ we are fighting, courageous, and dignified human beings who contribute to society. Stop the machismo!”

In one chat, Rosselló calls Mark-Viverito a “puta” for criticizing DNC Chair Tom Perez, who was siding with statehood Democrats like Rosselló, who is the leader of the Statehood party in Puerto Rico. In another, the governor’s former chief financial officer Christian Sobrino said of San Juan mayor Carmen Yulín Cruz, who is running for Puerto Rico governor in the 2020 elections, that he was “dying to shoot her up.” Rosselló replied: “You’d be doing me a big favor.”

Mark-Viverito, who now heads the Latino Victory Project, released a statement in response to the governor’s violent sexism.

“The governor’s machismo was exposed,” she said in Spanish. “When a male chauvinist wants to belittle a woman, he uses words like “whore” to belittle, dehumanize and degrade her. A person who uses that language against a woman, whether a public figure or not, should not govern Puerto Rico.”

The conversations also included transphobic remarks about transgender and gender nonconforming protestors and homophobic comments about Ricky Martin.

Credit: @ricky_martin / Twitter

“It is shameful and unacceptable and it isn’t resolved with an apology,” Martin tweeted. “This is not the government we need. This is not the Puerto Rico that our grandparents and parents built and even less [the Puerto Rico] we want to leave to our children.”

One associate wrote, “Nothing says patriarchal oppression like Ricky Martin. He is such a male chauvinist that he f–ks men because women don’t measure up. Pure patriarchy.”

Probably the most stomach-churning exchange in the leaked chat was Sobrino joking about the backlog of dead bodies after the devastating 2017 storm. 

Credit: @Chiji007 / Twitter

“Now that we are on the subject, don’t we have some cadavers to feed our crows? Clearly, they need attention,” he wrote, likely referencing journalists and the administration’s critics, who long questioned Rosselló’s assertion that the hurricane claimed only 64 lives. A Harvard study later put the death toll at 4,645. 

The impropriety, which has been nicknamed #TelegramGate, has been likened to the Watergate scandal, which rocked President Nixon’s administration in the 1970s and ultimately led to his resignation.  

“For Puerto Ricans, this has been basically our Watergate,” Caribbean scholar Yarimar Bonilla, who writes about post-Hurricane Maria recovery, told CBS News. “The government is distracted thinking about its image, worrying about how they’re being represented in the press instead of attending to matters of the recovery.”

While two members of Rosselló’s cabinet have offered their resignations, the people are similarly calling on Rosselló to step down.

For several days, thousands of protestors have taken over the streets of Old San Juan, packing the cobblestone lane in front of La Fortaleza, the governor’s mansion, demanding that he immediately give up his seat. On Monday, the mostly-peaceful action turned violent when police officers tear-gassed crowds, injuring dozens and arresting five protestors. The streets were ablaze, but the people, enlivened, stayed chanting that they were not afraid. 

They’re not alone. Celebrities like Ricky Martin, Residente, Kany Garcia, Jon Z and more have taken to social media calling on the governor to resign. Meanwhile, rapper PJ Sin Suela released a heated track called PUTA, referencing Rosselló’s misogynistic comments, about political corruption on the island, and Bad Bunny announced on Instagram that he would be leaving Europe, where he is touring, to fly to Puerto Rico and march with the people on Wednesday.

Bad Bunny posted a video as a call to action for all Puerto Ricans to march and demonstrate.

Across the U.S., Puerto Ricans of the diaspora have also united, with protests in New York, Washington, DC, and Philadelphia, and more scheduled for Tuesday in Miami and Orlando, where a majority of Puerto Ricans displaced by Hurricane María found refuge.

Despite the massive calls, on Tuesday morning, Rosselló, who has apologized for his “improper acts” and attended an Evangelical church where pastors prayed over him, insisted that he would not resign.

“I have not committed an illegal act and I have not committed an act of corruption,” he said during a press conference. “I committed some improper acts and I asked forgiveness for that.”

The governor also noted that the prime reason he would not resign is that he “was elected by the people” — despite many of those Puerto Ricans now begging for his removal.

Read: Two Racist Florida Women Are Caught On Video Telling A Puerto Rican Man To ‘Go Back To Mexico’ If He Wants To Speak Spanish

This Woman Hosted A Bad Bunny-Themed Birthday Party And It Was Everything

Entertainment

This Woman Hosted A Bad Bunny-Themed Birthday Party And It Was Everything

When Raquel Reichard started to plan her 29th birthday, she knew she wanted it to be a tribute to the one and only Bad Bunny. The Puerto Rican singer holds a special place in Reichard’s heart and nothing was going to derail this theme. Now, it wasn’t just a backdrop for selfies and a Bad Bunny playlist. No. Reichard went all out to give everyone a complete Bad Bunny experience while celebrating her birthday.

Raquel Reichard wanted to ring in her 29th birthday with a Bad Bunny tribute party.

Courtesy of Raquel Reichard

Reichard says that she is a huge Bad Bunny fans but it isn’t only because of his music. His music is very important to her but his social consciousness and mold-breaking styling as a reggaeton and Latin trap artist spoke to her.

“He makes great music,” Reichard says. “His lyrics are brilliant; he’s challenging machismo and redefining masculinity; he uplifts women in a way we really haven’t seen from cis het men, both in mainstream music and in grassroots movements; he’s open about his mental health journey; he speaks out against the political and social turmoil that is taking place in Puerto Rico right now, both by the US and local governments — and he does all this in a way that’s digestible and of the gente.”

She added: “Also, I think he’s fine as hell. If you know me, you know I’m a big Bad Bunny fan, una coneja mala, as my brother calls me now, so it only seemed fitting that if there were a theme to my birthday party this year, it had to be Benito.”

Reichard got crafty and creative and offered guests all sorts of goodies to hold and wear for photos that are Bad Bunny.

Courtesy of Raquel Reichard

Who wouldn’t want to wear some bunny ears while partying it up to some Bad Bunny songs? If there is one thing we can all agree with, playing dress up for a good party is always a fun time.

The biggest part of the party was the “Estamos Bien” theme.

Courtesy of Raquel Reichard

Reichard remembers 2017 being one of the hardest years of her life and how Bad Bunny’s music helped her cope with everything she was dealing with.

“I got out of an eight-year relationship with someone I thought I was going to marry. I left my job at a big-name magazine. I went from having a beautiful apartment to sleeping on a friend’s couch. I was broke. Hurricane María razed my island and compounded an already-horrifying financial crisis. My cousin passed away. Everything that could go wrong that year literally went wrong,” Reichard explains. “Reggaeton and Latin trap, particularly that of Bad Bunny’s, helped me through it all. His emo-perreo helped me twerk my way through every stage of loss, from anger to depression to acceptance. It was temporary relief on the dancefloor. It was bigging me up when I felt low. It was a passport to explore new parts of myself.”

So, the phrase “Estamos Bien” is something super important for Reichard.

Courtesy of Raquel Reichard

“‘Estamos Bien’ is a declaration and reminder of where I’m finally at in my life. As I said, 2017 was the most-difficult year of my life. The following year, I did the really challenging, but necessary, work that I needed to do to heal, learn and grow,” Reichard recalls. “At the start of 2019, I was feeling ‘ni bien, ni mal.’ But by spring, it hit me that for the first time in a while, I was good. More than that, the people around me were as well. Yes, we are facing so many battles, from our relationships and careers to natural disasters and political violence. This shit is real and my aim isn’t to minimize any of it. But saying ‘Estamos Bien’ in the midst of all the struggle is to say we got us because community love and joy is how we survive and thrive through it all. “

The phrase is so important to her life and the party’s theme that she put it on her cake.

Courtesy of Raquel Reichard

And what a cake that was. Honestly, this cake is giving us some serious FOMO for not being at this party. We can only imagine that this cake was as delicious as it is beautiful.

“The cake was made by Gabriella Lima, of Sweet G Cakez. She’s an amazing local Puerto Rican baker who also happens to be a family friend,” Reichard says. “All I told her was that I wanted it to be tropical Boricua vibes and inspired by the “Estamos Bien” music video, and, somehow, if she could, put Bad Bunny’s face on it.”

Clearly, the cake delivered on everything Reichard was hoping for. Who could be upset at seeing that cake?

Of course, she had to create some kind of imagery expressing her love for Bad Bunny.

Courtesy of Raquel Reichard

We ship it. If you are willing to show someone this much love, you should be able to express that love through fake wedding photos. Reichard says that she has so connected to Bad Bunny’s persona that she seeks to uplift him and Puerto Rico with him.

Oh. She also had a manicure station along with so many other things because Bad Bunny loves to get his nails done.

Courtesy of Raquel Reichard

“I had a manicure station, which included Bettina, a Puerto Rican brand of nail polishes, Bad Bunny nail decal from Cha Cha Nails, acetone that had Benito’s face on it, cotton balls and nail filers, all by a framed photo of Bad Bunny getting his nails done in his “Caro” music video,” Reichard explains. “I had a hookah station, which was a huge hit, and it also had a framed photo of El Conejo Malo smoking from the “I Like It” music video. Throughout the room, I had confetti of his face, including an obviously-edited photo of him embracing me, HA!, some of my favorite lines from his songs and a few of his classic tiny glasses, which folks were able to use for the night and take home.”

Clearly, everyone had a great time celebrating Reichard’s birthday and her love for all things Bad Bunny.

Courtesy of Raquel Reichard

You know it’s a good birthday when people are willing to wear a full costume to celebrate your special day. Happy birthday, Raquel!

READ: This Woman Had A Selena-Themed Party For Her Daughter’s Birthday And Our Hearts Can’t

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