Culture

21 Reasons Why Costa Rica Is The Happiest Country In The World

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Costa Rica is all the proof we need that there is a template for happiness and it relies on each and every one of us (and our government) to make people and our environment a priority. Costa Rica is by no means the richest country in the world, but researchers have learned what makes Costa Ricans some of the happiest people.

Here’s to taking a page out of Costa’s printed-on-recycled-paper book.

1. Costa Rica is ranked #1 in the Happy Planet Index (HPI).

CREDIT: @mycostarica / Instagram

Can you imagine why? It was No. 1 in 2009 and 2012 as well. Professor Mariano Rojas, the country’s leading economist, says that the key to happiness is Costa Rica’s culture of strong communities of friends, families and neighbors.

2. They live longer than Americans.

CREDIT: @Roblesabanacoff / Twitter

And by the way, they also have a quarter of the GDP than most other Western European and North American countries. Riches truly can’t buy happiness, or even longevity. Costa Rica is proof.

3. Costa Rica’s ecological footprint is a third the size of the USA’s.

CREDIT: @mycostarica / Instagram

It’s government is very focused on maintaining the island’s pristine ecosystems, and for good reason. Eco-tourism is the economy’s largest industry.

4. I mean, look at just one of its National Parks:

CREDIT: @mycostarica / Instagram

Caption: “Manuel Antonio is Costa Rica’s smallest National Park, just 4.900 acres of land and 136.000 acres under water. Forbes magazine even considered Manuel Antonio Costa Rica to be among the top twelve most beautiful national parks in the world! Two and three-toed sloths, coatimundis, howler monkeys, hummingbirds and iguanas are just a few of the many species of animals that you can see here.”

SLOTHS, GUYS.

4. In 2015, the country produced 99% of its electricity from renewable energy.

CREDIT: @KathrynBruscoBk / Twitter

The government plans to become entirely carbon neutral by 2021. Look at Costa Rica leading the world in environmental protection.

5. Costa Rica’s new Cabinet has more women than men.

CREDIT: @TheTicoTimes / Twitter

So it makes sense that they’re winning at their government-led programs. #ByePatriarchy

6. The government tried to ban all zoos.

CREDIT: @DMAX_es / Twitter

But, alas, companies that profit off animals will do their damnest to keep exploiting them. The company that owns the two zoos in the country took the government to court and is permitted to operate for the rest of their contract. Eight years until we see them shut down.

7. Costa Rica did ban the keeping of cetaceans in captivity.

CREDIT: @mycostarica / Instagram

That means that the country isn’t renting out its dolphins for tourists to swim with and there will never be a #FreeTilly movement. H/t to you Costa Rica.

8. And they have a dog sanctuary called “Land of the Strays.”

CREDIT: @mycostarica / Instagram

As soon as a stray gets there, he’s neutered, given vaccines, and left to roam free and play with other dogs. Plus, they’re all up for adoption! Costa Rica is a legit friend to animals.

9. It’s home to just one of five Blue Zones in the world.

CREDIT: @robert_ruggiero / Twitter

Blue Zones are places where people live longer, happier, and healthier than anywhere else in the world. The Nicoya Peninsula is just the place, and this research tells us why Costa Ricans are so happy.

10. Strong community bonds top the list.

CREDIT: @oliverlozornio / Twitter

Like many of our own homes, the generations before and after you live in or around your house. The neighbors are like extended family, and are actively involved in their lives.

11. They stay active until old age, which is on average 78.6 years old.

CREDIT: @CentAm_Beauty / Twitter

You know how, when you’re outside in the sun, you just feel happier? Agriculture is a major economy driver in Costa Rica which means its residents spend their days cultivating the land they live on and releasing endorphins all over the place.

12. Which means they’re eating home cooked and farm fresh meals all day long.

CREDIT: @agapecostarica / Twitter

Here’s the key to a happy live: homemade corn tortillas, rice, beans, platanos, cabbage and carrot salad, and a protein. Here are some examples of good Costa Rican food.

13. We can’t not talk about Gallo Pinto

CREDIT: @peopleplatesandplanet / Instagram

I’m drooling. This breakfast dish is made of rice and beans with peppers, cilantro and onions. When it’s all mixed up, it looks like a “spotted rooster” tu sabes?

14. Costa Rican Tamales are ajo af.

CREDIT: @theedjraul / Instagram

Unlike Mexican tamales, Costa Rican tamales are wrapped in banana leaves instead of corn husks, and are much less spicy and just as good and garlicky.

15. Last but not least, there’s Arroz con leche.

CREDIT: @arte_gastronomico / Instagram

To make it vegan, use full fat coconut milk, very soft rice, and all the spices (lemon zest, salt, sugar and cinnamon sticks).

16. Back to business: Costa Rica hasn’t had an army since 1949.

CREDIT: @DynamikWorks / Twitter

President Jose Figueres literally smashed the national military headquarters with a wall and then turned it into a national art museum. Imagine a world where your country isn’t at war, or being threatened to be nuked. If you’re in the U.S., you get the fear.

17. All the best healthcare, education and employment rates.

CREDIT: @TheTicoTimes / Twitter

Since then, it use war funds on education, health and pensions. The GDP of Costa Rica is less than $8,000 but a literacy rate of 97.8% and employment rate of 91.5%.

18. The weather is perfecto.

CREDIT: @de_ride_photography / Instagram

We’re talking about a tropical island where the temperature ranges from 71 to 80°F, with ocean breezes from all directions. So this kind of life is just casual.

19. Did we mention they also have sloths?

CREDIT: @mycostarica / Instagram

Like, they’re not difficult to spot. Any native could tell you a few of their local spots to see sloths. THEY ARE JUST THE CUTEST.

20. And volcanos?

CREDIT: @mycostarica / Instagram

Like I said, super casual island to live on. When I moved from Florida to LA, it took me months to get used to seeing mountains. I think I’d be annoyingly in awe for the rest of my life if volcanoes were my yard view.

Costa Rican Officials Claim That A Missing Florida Man Wandered Into A River But His Family Doesn’t Believe It

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Costa Rican Officials Claim That A Missing Florida Man Wandered Into A River But His Family Doesn’t Believe It

Texas EquuSearch - TEXQ / Facebook

Sixty-two-year-old retired accountant, Charles Hughes of Tampa, Florida has been missing since August 3rd.  The avid traveler had just visited Costa Rica last month. While he was there, he met a man and the two hit it off. Hughes quickly made plans to return to Costa Rica and meet up with his new companion. 

Hughes was staying at Cabinas Jiménez in Puerto Jiménez off Gulfo Dulce and all seemed well until Charlie no longer had steady communication, no more calls or text, no more social media post. Immediately his sister Nancy began to panic. She and their siblings began to reach out to all local law enforcement in the area where her brother was last seen.

Credit: Cabinas Jímenez / Facebook

It has now been nearly a month and Charlie Hughes never made his return flight home. The family is fighting to get more answers. A week ago, local officials made a discovery, Hughes rental car was found at the bottom of Nuevo Rio River in Puerto Jiménez.

According to Hughes sister, Nancy Steffens, officials have told her that her brother most likely “wandered off” into the river.

Credit: Charlie Hughes / Facebook

Hughes’s family has said that they do not believe the story the authorities are giving them. Not only was their brother an experienced traveler but they are a military family who relocated often, therefore Charlie was able to adapt to new spaces quickly. Plus, this wasn’t his first trip to Costa Rica, he was actually returning to the same area he had previously visited. 

The family stated that they are not giving up hope. They are going to fight until they get the truth.

As for the man that was Charlie’s new friend – who is also the last person known to have seen Charlie – Nancy says local authorities told the family they questioned the man and have released him.

Hughes and his companion (who hasn’t been named) hasn’t been seen since. 

Credit: TexasEquuSearch – TEXQ / Facebook

A family that knows all too well what the Hughes is going through, is Carla Stefaniak’s family. The Venezuelan-American was an Insurance Agent and also an experienced traveler, also from Florida (Miami.) Stefaniak had booked a trip to Costa Rica to celebrate her 36th birthday.

This new mysterious death in Costa Rica is troubling.

Credit: carla_margarita / Instagram

Ready to ring in around trip around the Sun, she checked into her Airnbn and enjoyed a few days with her sister-in-law who then returned home on that Tuesday and Stefaniak was supposed to return home the following day on Wednesday, but just like Hughes she never boarded her return flight. 

In Carla’s last text to her family, sent November 27, 2018, she told them it was raining pretty hard and the lights kept going in and out at the place she was staying at, her last words read “this place seems pretty sketch.”

By December 3, 2018, the family was working round the clock on a full-scale search, sharing her story with every and any media outlet, in hopes to bring their daughter home safely.

The disappearance of Stefaniak made national headlines in the U.S. as the family searched for their loved one.

Credit: carla_margarita / Instagram

Sadly, a couple of days later her body was found, buried in a shallow grave behind the Airbnb she was staying at. Her family confirmed that is was her. The security guard employed at the gated villa is now being tried for her murder. 

Airbnb has since removed the property from their listings.

Just months before the Carla Stefaniak case, there were three cases of missing tourist whose bodies were later recovered. 

Costa Rica has been known for its beautiful beaches and relatively low crime has always been considered one of the safest tourist destinations. According to the stats at InSight Crime, even though Costa Rica hit a record high in 2017 for homicides, their numbers are still significantly lower than the numbers for the No. 1 Latin American destination place for tourist, Mexico.

InSight Crime lists different reasons for a rise in crime, but there does seem to by a cycle that is followed starting with imperialism that carries over decades that then creates unstable governments and depreciates the value of the currency in a country. When we see the currency drop that creates the perfect storm for criminal organizations to rise-up and recruits. 

We have seen this happen in Mexico and we are currently seeing this happen in Central America. Make no mistake, this doesn’t happen out of anywhere, there is decades build-up to how this rise in crime happens. 

For many Latinos in the United States, especially those on the border, traveling between two countries is nothing new. We grew up already hearing little life lessons from our parents like “esconde el dinero” “no hables ingles” always be aware of your surroundings and never give too much information.

However, for the millennial Latino generation we are traveling solo more often, we are creating content on social media, and we are living in a time of instant access. We now have AirBNB and Uber, so many other apps that make these common-sense tips sometimes get lost in our day-to-day lives.

As with any trip planning to any country, it is always good to do your research and there are plenty of websites, blogs, etc., that can offer safety trips and travel alerts, to keep yourself informed.

Always check the State Department website for travel advisories when planning international travel.

Credit: U.S. State Department

Don’t cancel your plans to visit Costa Rica, just yet. As of a few days ago, the website World Population Review listed their top safest countries to visit in Latin America, Costa Rica ranks number three.

READ: Costa Rica Is Warning Everyone To Stop Drinking Alcohol As 19 People Have Died Due To Tainted Alcohol

Costa Rica Is Warning Everyone To Stop Drinking Alcohol As 19 People Have Died Due To Tainted Alcohol

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Costa Rica Is Warning Everyone To Stop Drinking Alcohol As 19 People Have Died Due To Tainted Alcohol

Costa Rica Ministry of Health

Costa Ricans are on edge after 19 people have been died because of tainted alcochol. According to authorities, each of the victims died after drinking alcohol with toxic levels of methanol.

So far 14 men and five women, in several cities across the country, have died.

As of now, there have been 19 deaths across Costa Rica related to tainted alcohol.

Credit: @ABC / Twitter

At least 19 people have died in Costa Rica after consuming alcohol contaminated with toxic levels of methanol, officials said.

The victims, who ranged from 32 to 72 in age, consumed the tainted alcohol in various cities across the country dating back to early last month, the country’s Ministry of Health revealed over the weekend.

They each died from what appeared to be methanol poisoning. The fatalities occurred in San José, Cartago, Limón, Guanacaste and Heredia.

“It is important to emphasize that this information is preliminary since the investigations continue,” the statement said. “The Ministry of Health continues to carry out operations throughout the national territory in order to reduce the exposure of consumers to adulterated products.”

The government is so concerned they’ve started confiscating huge amounts of alcohol from restaurants, bars, and clubs.

Credit: @CNN / Twitter

Government officials confiscated more than 30,000 bottles of alcohol suspected to be tainted, the ministry said in a statement on Friday, warning residents to avoid several brands that tested positive for contamination.

They’re also telling people to avoid consuming alcohol from a number of specific brands until they’re sure it’s safe.

Until authorities can figure out exactly what is going on and which brands or types of alcohol are affected, the government is urging all people in Costa Rica to hold off from consuming alcohol for now.

Though the government did release a list of suspected brands (which you should definitely avoid) and they include Molotov, Timbuka, and Aguardiente.

Alcohol poisoning, particularly from methanol, can make people feel really drunk really fast, not giving them time to realize something might be wrong.

Credit: @NYDailyNews / Twitter

Adulterated liquor often contains methanol, which can make people feel inebriated. Adding methanol to distilled spirits enables sellers to increase the amount of liquid and its potential potency, according to SafeProof, a group that lobbies against counterfeit alcohol.

Methanol poisoning can cause confusion, dizziness, drowsiness, headaches and the inability to coordinate muscle movements. Even small amounts can be toxic. According to the World Health Organization, outbreaks of methanol poisoning are usually linked to “adulterated counterfeit or informally-produced spirit drinks.”

Costa Rica isn’t alone Outbreaks have happened around the world.

Outbreaks have hit countries around the world in recent years, each ranging in size from 20 to over 800 victims, WHO reports. This year, at least 154 people died and more than 200 others were hospitalized after drinking tainted alcohol in India. The victims consumed unregulated moonshine, known as “country-made liquor” in the northeast state of Assam.

Twitter was quick to start jumping to conclusions.

Credit: @CNN / Twitter

Many on Twitter started linking the news out of Costa Rica to the recent string of suspicious deaths in the Dominican Republic. Although some victims families (of those who have died in the DR) have speculated that their deaths were caused by alcohol poisoning, authorities haven’t yet confirmed that. So it’s definitely too soon to connect the dots here.

So how do you stay safe when you’re traveling but want to enjoy that tasty tropical cocktail or the local specialty?

Credit: @MeriAssociates / Twitter

So how do you stay safe when you’re drinking abroad and living out that vacation fantasy? First, pay attention to what you’re buying. Look at the price (is it too cheap?) and packaging (is it sealed?) of the product. If it tastes bad, don’t drink it. Additionally, according to the U.S. Overseas Security Advisory Council, follow these guidelines:

  1. Don’t drink homemade or counterfeit “booze.”
  2. Don’t overdo it.
  3. Don’t compete with locals and their brew.
  4. Don’t let your drink out of sight.