Culture

Queer Latinx To Recognize For the Pride Month in June

The month of June is Pride Month and there are many Queer latinx organizers to look out for! From poets to actors, people join together to create a more inclusive society for the LGBTQ community. Celebrate this Pride month by becoming an ally and sporting your brightest rainbow colors.

1. Bamby Salcedo

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Bamby is a trans Latina activist born in Guadalajara, Mexico. She is the founder of TransLatina@ Coalition, a Los Angles-based organization advocating for the needs and rights of trans Latinx residing in the U.S.  

2. Jennicet Gutiérrez

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Jennicet is a trans Latina activist, infamously known for disrupting former President Obama during an LGBT Pride event at the White House. She asked that all LGBTQ immigrants be released from detention centers. She is also one of the founding members of La Familia: Trans Queer Liberation Movement. 

3. Alan Pelaez Lopez

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Alan is an Afro-Indigenous poet, collage, installation and adornment artist raised in Oaxaca, Mexico. They were a former writer for Everyday Feminism, where their work centered around Trans/Queer and migrant issues. 

4. Isa Noyola

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Isa is currently the Director of Programs at the Transgender Law Center, where she organizes for the rights of the Trans community. In 2015, she organized the first trans anti-violence national protest.

5. Julio Salgado

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Julio Salgado is a queer, undocumented artist born in Long Beach, California. Salgado uses his art as a way to empower the queer, undocumented community and retaliate against anti-immigrant rhetoric. 

6. Sylvia Rivera

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Sylvia is one of the best-known icons of the Queer community, Most widely known for being at the forefront of the Stonewall Riots, Rivera was also the founder of the Gay Liberation Front and the Gay Activist Alliance.

7. Maricón Collective

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Maricón Collective is a group of four queer Chicano artist bases in LA. They are popular for using their art to reclaim the word “maricón” and find empowerment within it! 

8. Ruby Corado

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Digital Image. CasaRuby. June 20, 2018.

Ruby is a trans Latina activist born in El Salvador and founder of Casa Ruby. Casa Ruby is the only LGBTQ bilingual and multicultural organization in Washington that dedicate itself in providing services for Queer/Trans People of Color. 

9. Sara Ramirez

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Sara Ramirez is a Mexican-born actress, most known for her role as bisexual doctor Callie Torres on Grey’s Anatomy, In 2016, Ramirez came out as bisexual and since then has been active in advocating for LGBTQ rights! 

10. Laura Aguilar

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Laura was a lesbian photographer, known for her risqué images. One of her most notable series is Latina Lesbians, where she photographed queer and lesbian women with their own captions. Laura Aguilar recently passed away in April 2018. 

11. Yosimar Reyes

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Yosimar is an undocumented, queer latinx poet born in Guerrero, Mexico. Yosimar’s poetry explores themes of sexuality and migration, as well as his own life growing up in San Jose, California. His most popular work is his self-published collection, “For Colored Boys Who Speak Softly…”.

12. Arianna Lint

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Arianna Lint is a Peruvian trans Latina Activist based in Florida. Lint is most known for her work advocating for better health resources for HIV-positive communities. She also advocated nationally through her work in the Executive Board of the TransLatina Coalition. 

13. Gloria Anzaldúa

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Anzaldúa was a queer Chicana poet and writer. She was widely known for her essays criticizing queer and feminist theory and her poetry expressing anger against marginalization of her people. Gloria Anzaldúa passed away in May 2014.

14. Victoria Rodriguez- Roldan

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Victoria is queer latinx activist that serves as the Trans/Gender Non-Conforming Justice Project Director at the National LGBTQ Task Force. One of Rodriguez-Roldan’s most notable achievements is her successful lobbying of issuing transgender inclusive driver’s licenses and state ID documents in Puerto Rico.

15. Gabby Rivera

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Gabby Rivera is a queer Latinx writer from the Bronx, New York. She has published a Young Adult novel, but is most currently known as a comic book writer for Marvel’s America Chavez. The series, titled “America”, is the first to feature a lesbian superhero.

16. Salem Acuña

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Acuña is a queer Latinx activist, originally from Santiago, Chile. Salem worked with the Southerners On New Ground, where he advocated for racial and economic justice is the U.S. South. Currently, Acuña works with MIjente, a political organization focusing on Latinx and Chicanx issues. 

17. Sonia Guiñansaca

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Sonia is a Harlem-based, queer latinx migrant poet, cultural organizer and activist. Born in Ecuador, Guiñansaca is internationally acclaimed for her work centering undocumented youth in New York and using her art as resistance.

18. Juniperangelica Gia Cordova

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Juniperangelica Gia Cordova is a queer latinx scholar and activist. Working closely with GSA Network and Transgender Law Center. Gia works tirelessly to advocate for the queer/trans youth, fight against homelessness, and more!

How are you celebrating Pride? Share your Pride love and stories with us using #QueerLatinoPride and #StoriesOfUs?

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Armed Police In Tulum Arrested A Gay Couple For Allegedly Kissing On The Beach

Things That Matter

Armed Police In Tulum Arrested A Gay Couple For Allegedly Kissing On The Beach

Despite the COVID-19 pandemic, Mexico has remained a popular tourist destination as people seek out places with fewer restrictions. However, Mexico’s popular beach destination of Tulum apparently still has some restrictions – for LGBTQ folks – that the police are quick to enforce.

A Canadian couple was briefly detained by police for allegedly kissing on the beach.

Police in the popular resort town of Tulum, about 90-minutes south of Cancun, briefly arrested a gay couple for kissing in public on a beach, alleging that the couple was not allowed to kiss in public because children were present.

According to local media reports, police said they were reacting to a report by someone else on the beach who had claimed that the men were “committing immoral acts.”

The couple were handcuffed together and ordered in to the back of a patrol vehicle until a crowd of onlookers formed and began to shout disapprovingly at police after one of the men explained to the crowd why they were being detained.

Outraged bystanders gathered around the couple and urged the police to let the men go.

The crowd began shouting in support of the couple, calling the actions homophobic and demanding the couple’s release.

The pressure from the crowd apparently prompted officers to release the men after a few minutes of dialogue. The presence of Escalante herself might also have been a factor.

In response to the arrest, Quintana Roo Tulum Police said: ‘We are an inclusive and impartial police both for residents and tourists who visit the state of Quintana Roo. So no abuse of authority will be tolerated.’

Video of the incident quickly went viral on social media with outrage being the common reaction.

Video and photos of the arrest went viral after on social media accounts, including that of local politician Maritza Escalante Morales, who denounced the actions of the officers. Escalante happened to be at the beach with her family when she noticed the officers approach the couple, she said, and joined the crowd to advocate for the couple’s release.

“I want to file a PUBLIC COMPLAINT, because the treatment and type of authorities we have in our municipality is inexcusable. Yesterday while I was on the beach with my family, we noticed around 4:30 that 2 police squads in their ATVs approached a group of young foreigners. After about 20 minutes, a patrol arrived and proceeded to arrest them with handcuffs,” she explained on TikTok.

“The policemen were VIOLENT,” Morales added, “and gave arguments such as ‘there are families and children and they cannot be seeing this. I am FURIOUS because it is not possible that in the XXI century this type of oppression against the LGBT+ community continues. We all deserve the same treatment, and appropriate sanctions must be applied to these authorities.”

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Kehlani Dresses as Both Prom King and Queen on Cover of ‘Playboy’, Talks Feeling Comfortable in Both Gender Roles

Entertainment

Kehlani Dresses as Both Prom King and Queen on Cover of ‘Playboy’, Talks Feeling Comfortable in Both Gender Roles

Photo via kehlani/Instagram

Kehlani has long been open about the fluid nature of her gender expression. That’s why it’s exciting that the R&B star is experimenting with different facets of her personality on the most recent cover of Playboy.

In a bold move, Kehlani appears on Playboy‘s latest cover dressed in both (traditionally) women and (traditionally) men’s clothing.

And as if one Kehlani isn’t exciting enough, the magazine cover treats us to two versions of this Oakland native. On the left side of the magazine, Kehlani is dressed up as a Prom Queen, complete with a resplendent gown and a tiara. On the cover’s right side, Kehlani is dressed in Prom King drag: her tie undone, her collar open, her crown askew.

She shared the picture to her personal Instagram page with the cheeky caption: “I always wanted to date me.”

In the accompanying interview, Kehlani talks about gender identity and expression, motherhood, and owning her sexuality.

When Kehlani was asked how she defines masculinity and femininity, Kehlani got refreshingly candid. “I’ve discovered that I’ve run from a lot of femininity,” she admitted. “I was way more comfortable in a more masculine space. I feel more masculine when I am in my stillness and I’m grounded in a quiet, contemplative mode.”

She then explained that she feels “most feminine” when she’s “being the mother of my house.” (Kehlani had a baby girl named Adeya Nomi in 2019). She also explained that she “feels her femininity” when she ‘s indulging in self-care, like soaking in a flower-filled bath, or doing a hair mask.

“My femininity makes me feel soft and gentle and tender and careful in a different way than my masculinity makes me feel,” she said. “I’m trying not to let it fall into the gender norms of feminine and masculine, but for me it does a tiny bit. But I also am very fluid in both of those settings.”

Kehlani has always been open about her fluid sexuality and gender identity.

In 2018, she tweeted: “Not bi, not straight. I’m attracted to women, men, REALLY attracted to queer men, non-binary people, intersex people, trans people”.

But of course, haters on the internet accused her of “queer-baiting”–that is, pretending she’s queer to get more LGBT fans and attract attention. In an interview with The Guardian last year, she revealed why the accusation frustrates her.

“I’ve had girlfriends in front of people’s faces, right under their noses, and they weren’t famous and so nobody cared to make it public,” she said. “So they automatically assume that I must like men more than women.”

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