Culture

Here Are The Unofficial Job Titles You Had While You Lived With Your Parents

Lets be real, most of us lived with our parents for more than 18 years but we probably took for granted how much they helped us strengthen our resume. Yep! More than you could imagine…

If there’s one job you’ve developed years of experience in after living with your parents, it’s in Information Technology (IT).

CREDIT: @PRINCESSTHECMA / INSTAGRAM

You nourished these skills every time you helped your dad fix the television or set up the wifi. You also got a ton of experience showing your mom how to upload a picture onto her Facebook account. You are, and always will be, their personal IT department.

And your set of skills only expanded after taking on the full-time position as translator.

CREDIT: THE PROSPECT / GIPHY

If your parents weren’t 100% fluent in English, then you were the one handling all important paper work and phone calls for them.

When it came to urgent mandados, you became your parents’ personal GPS.

CREDIT: LUIS GUZMAN / YOUTUBE

There was no need for Google Maps or even Apple Maps, because they had you.

But if your mom or dad didn’t feel like driving at all, then you would take on the position as her chauffeur.

CREDIT: LUIS GUZMAN / YOUTUBE

And this was the most stressful job ever, because you had to listen to them yell and complain about your driving skills.

After so many hours, you would even hit overtime with your weekend job as janitor.

CREDIT: SITILA VALERA / YOUTUBE

Mom doesn’t care if you already work as a full-time student. Your clock is her extra loud music and you’re getting up at 7 a.m. on the dot.

And just when you thought you had a few vacation days to relax, you then had to head to your part-time job as babysitter to your younger siblings or primos.

CREDIT: SAIDA CUPE / YOUTUBE

Your days off of school were spent with crying babies, dirty diapers and hundreds of baby wipes.

In addition to babysitting, you were also responsible for being the intel informant every time you were left in charge of your siblings.

CREDIT: LUCIANO VELIZ / YOUTUBE

As the intel informant AKA the chismosa, you were responsible for notifying your parents every time your siblings misbehaved.

But once you grew tired of being indoors and making phone calls all day, you then moved on to different outdoor, volunteer opportunities.

CREDIT: ELISSA FDEZ TIBURCIO / FACEBOOK

As a mechanical engineer intern, you learned the names of every tool and became proficient at holding your dad’s beer whenever needed.

Even though it was hard work, all of the labor really helped you get in great shape.

CREDIT: EDDIE CARRILLO / YOUTUBE

Business trips to la tienda with your mom were probably the most exhausting.

But no matter how many tasks your parents assigned you, it would be enough to pay them back for what they do for you.


READ: Finally Someone’s Calling Out Latino Parents For Treating Their Sons And Daughters Differently


What other jobs did you do for your parents growing up? Comment and hit the share button below!

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4-Year-Old Girl Accidentally Hung Herself While Climbing A Tree

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4-Year-Old Girl Accidentally Hung Herself While Climbing A Tree

A mother living in the United Kingdom is enduring a “hellstorm of grief” following the tragic death of her 4-year-old daughter. Just days after welcoming her twin daughters, Elise Thorpe was forced to learn of her daughter Freya’s shocking death after she climbed a tree near her home in Upper Heyford, Oxfordshire.

Just before her death, Freya was wearing a bicycle helmet when she went for her tree clim.

Freya slipped and began to fall off of the tree when her helmet strap caught on to a branch.

Elisa Thorpe is speaking out about the incident which took place in September 2019 despite efforts to resuscitate her daughter by emergency responders. According to Yahoo, “An inquest into her death in January 2020 ruled that she ‘potentially slipped’ and her helmet caught on a branch, causing the helmet strap to become ‘tight against her throat.’ She died in hospital two days later.”

Speaking about the incident Elise told The Sun “We live every day and night in hell, torture, sheer shock, and grief that can’t be comprehended.”

Elise told South West News Service that she and her husband “were on cloud nine after the long-awaited arrival and difficult pregnancy” of their twins Kiera and Zack. Speaking about the grief she experienced, Elise said that she would have taken her own life had it not been for the birth of her children.

Recalling the day of Freya’s death, Elise explained that her little girl had gone for a playdate.

“In the early afternoon, Daddy had to go off to collect the special milk from Boots pharmacy in Cowley for the twins, as they were allergic to cow’s milk,” Elise Thorpe explained about how her daughter had been invited to play at a house just a 10-second walk away.

Freya had gone outside without her mother knowing.

“I had a gut feeling I wanted her home. Shortly after, I saw an ambulance at the end of the road – I panicked, at the time not knowing why I was panicking,” Elise told SWNS. “I called my husband to say I was going to get her back from the house behind. He said, ‘No, I’m five minutes away, stay with the babies.’”

“I saw his car go past and not return from the little cul-de-sac. I knew something was wrong,” she went onto explain. After spotting her husband speaking with a firefighter, Elise “grabbed the twins and rushed to a cordoned area where she saw first responders working desperately on Freya.”

After two days of waiting at John Radcliffe Hospital, the Thorpe family learned Freya could not be saved.

“I never stepped foot inside my home again. This is something I also lost and miss to this day — my home,” Elise went onto say. “Had I not given birth only 10 days before we would have taken our lives in the hospital that night, without a shadow of a doubt… We have had so much support over the last 18 months and we can’t tell you all how much that’s helped us through and for that I can never thank everyone enough for the support, kind words and donations – even from those we’ve never met.”

“But we’ve also experienced scrutiny and abuse from people who’ve asked, ‘Where were the parents? How could they let her out alone?’” she added sadly. “It has caused family rifts from relatives and judgment all because people didn’t know Freya wasn’t in our care when this happened.”

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Neighbors Raised $60k to Keep this Mariachi Band Family From Being Evicted During the Pandemic

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Neighbors Raised $60k to Keep this Mariachi Band Family From Being Evicted During the Pandemic

Photo via Cielito Lindo Family Folk Music/Facebook

While the pandemic has negatively impacted a lot of Americans, those who derived their income from in-person industries like food, hospitality, and live entertainment, have been hit the hardest.

Once COVID-19 shut the country down, many household were forced to scramble to make ends meet. And while the government offered some assistance, for many it wasn’t enough.

This predicament was exactly what the Chicago family, the Luceros, were going through.

The Luceros are a Chicago-based Mexican-American family who moonlight as the mariachi band, Cielito Lindo. Around Chicago, the Lucero family was known for their astonishing musical abilities.

Juan and Susie Lucero are parents to a talented team of seven children, all of whom play different musical instruments and have breathtaking singing voices. Diego, Miguel, Antonio, Carlos, Lilia, Maya, and Mateo all have different roles within the band, while Juan is the bandleader.

Before the pandemic, the Lucero family derived the majority of their income from their live performances. They would cover classic favorites like “El Rey” as well as doing mariachi-twists on modern pop hits like Cardi B’s “I Like it Like That”.

But when COVID-19 hit in March of 2020, the Lucero family was no longer allowed to play live events.

All of their performances were canceled. Even their long-standing weekly gig at a local restaurant disappeared. Their income dropped by 40%.

While the Luceros tried to cut corners and make small changes, the reality was, they couldn’t keep up with their bills. By the time Christmas rolled around, they were $18,000 behind on rent. They got an eviction notice.

The family had heard that the government had launched a rent-assistance program, but they couldn’t find many details on how to apply. They were completely lost.

Desperate for help, Juan Lucero reached out to his Facebook friends, asking them if they knew how to apply for government assistance.

But what he got in return was something even better. Their community decided to step up and take action.

“A few of us talked and said, ‘We can’t let them be evicted from their home. There’s just no way,'” their neighbor, Robert Farster, recently told CBS This Morning.

Farster ended up creating a GoFundMe page for the Lucero family. “Our good friends, the Luceros, need help,” he wrote. “Juan, Susy and their seven kids are too proud to ask for it, so as their friends, we’re stepping in.”

Within days, Farster had raised over $60,000, veritably saving the Luceros from eviction.

“It’s like a miracle. We didn’t expect that,” Juan Lucero told This Morning. “It feels like a big warm hug from many people.”

Juan’s wife, Susy Lucreo felt the same way. Despite these divisive times, she felt tons of love and support from her community.

“We feel very much loved and accepted as a Mexican-American family with roots in Guadalajara,” she told This Morning. “And we come together to share that combination of culture, which really is what America is all about–this big melting pot.

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