Culture

Everybody Thinks Carne Asada Fries Are From California, But Is That Fact Or Fiction?

Eater / Instagram

Ok, so let’s be real. Everybody loves fries. They’re literally the greatest way you can eat potatoes and they happen to come in an endless rainbow of options.

But we all know the clear winner of the perfect vessel for eating fries are carne asada fries. Obviously.

But there’s lot you might know about the bomb dish so we’re here to give you a little master class while sharing pictures of amazing carne asada fries that will have you out the door or on your Uber Eats app in no time.

First off, many people think carne asada fries are specifically from Southern California.

That’s not exactly true. Sure there are several restaurants in San Diego that claim to have invented the magical dish but Mexicans have been putting papas with grilled meats for a looooong time.

But that’s not exactly true. Case in point the taco arrachera:

Credit: omgitsjustintime / Instagram

You can find this classic taco combination all over Mexico, especially at farmer’s markets called tianguis.

These humble tacos are proof that meats and papas belong together and they’ve been together long before San Diego started claiming asada fries as their own.

Now that we’ve cleared that up let’s get to the actual asada fries.

Credit: plantbasedfatkid / Instagram

Carne asada fries are a local specialty found on the menus of restaurants all across Southern California and now even in Arizona and other states wth large Latino communities. As I mentoned above, restaurants in San Diego claim to have created the dish so it’s especially popular there.

And since we’re keeping things real, carne asada fries (at least not Cali-style ones) aren’t exactly authentic Mexican food – so you won’t typically find them on menus at traditional Mexican restaurants.

The Cali-style asada fries that everyone loves is said to have originated at Lolita’s Taco Shop in San Diego.

Credit: LolitasTacoShop / Instagram

Lolita’s Mexican Food in San Diego claims to have originated the dish in the late 1990s, inspired by a suggestion from their tortilla distributor.

And now you can find them all over Southern California.

Credit: eater / Instagram

The dish is also served at Petco Park and Dodger Stadium. By 2015, fast food chain Del Taco began to sell the item. It’s safe to say they’re pretty much every where and we couldn’t be more thankful.

But for those people who are totally clueless, what exactly are carne asada fries?

Credit: plantbasedfatkid / Instagram

They’re some of the most tasty fries you’ll ever eat. Plain and simple.

First, they start off with a generous portion of amazing potatoes topped with perfectly grilled meats.

Credit: guapomole / Instagram

Typically, the fries are of the shoestring variety, but other cuts may be used, as well. The carne asada is usually finely chopped to avoid the need for a knife so you eat them as they’re supposed to be enjoyed – with greasy, dirty fingers.

In many places, especially in San Diego and LA, they’ll then get topped with a giant portion of beans and cheese.

Credit: justin0202 / Instagram

The cheese is commonly cotija, although many placesuse a less-costly shredded cheese mix which melts with the other ingredients and keeps longer.

They’re then finished off with some sour cream and guac, thus creating an explosion of flavor.

Credit: theburerlab / Instagram

Carne asada fries have a devout following on Twitter. Like some people just can’t help themselves.

Credit: @purpsnat / Twitter

I mean lay it all out there girl. Now’s not the time for vergüenza.

And for some, they rather have carne asada fries in their belly than intimate human contact.

Credit: wcarrillo_13 / Twitter

I’m pretty sure we can all relate. Like I know I’ve been there.

Like you know a food is amazing when people take to Twitter to share their carne asada fries fan art.

Credit: @strayserval / Twitter

This. is. everything.

And although the original carne asada fries are literally life, there’s nothing wrong with experimentation.

We all know about carne asada fries. However, for all of you sweet vegetarians, use Hot Cheetos to change things up. Instead of using meat, this snack add another layer to the very popular french fries dish. You really can’t go wrong with fried potatoes, cheese, sour cream and Hot Cheetos.

READ: 15 Carne Asada Recipes That Will Have You Drooling Before The End Of This Post

We Asked, And These Are The 14 Weirdest Junk Food Meals You Eat

Culture

We Asked, And These Are The 14 Weirdest Junk Food Meals You Eat

GUYS. Here we are again, the single most important day of the year. 

Each year, the sun rises and sets on National Junk Food Day and it’s our civic, journalistic duty to get elbow-deep into what you’ve told us are your favorite Latino junk foods. 

Yup, today we’re sinking teeth into the 14 wackiest, más loco creations that humanity has ever inflicted upon its arteries. Get ready for food porn that will have your mouth and eyeballs watering. 

These sickening Dorilocos.

Credit: @Badabun / Facebook

We’re kicking off with this beautiful tray of dorilocos. Why? It’s basically salad.

And by salad we mean little tiny irregular shapes that go everywhere when you dig in. The similarities end there, because, well, it’s all crispy dorito chips, cueritos (pickled pork rinds), jicama, crunchy japonés peanuts… and the occasional gummy bear. 

Dorilocos may look suspiciously similar to a child’s lunchbox that came open in his/her backpack, but don’t be fooled – it’s finger licking good. It’s usually eaten out of a bag of Doritos that is sliced open sideways and topped off with lime juice, chili powder, salsa Valentina and chamoy. 

It’s funky, it’s madness and we live for it. Two of your five a day. 

These hot cheetos carne asada fries – yell that five times fast.

Credit: @CaliforniaCravings / Facebook

Mmm, baby. What’s not to love? This Cali classic hits all the right spots with its oozy, cheesy and fatty setup. Shoestring fries, charred carne asada, guac, sour cream, melted cheese and Cheetos (extra points if they’re flaming hot). 2,000 calories just looks so good on a plate. 

These small but mighty Jicaletas.

Credit: @Lentilbreakdown.com

What’s the best thing since sliced bread? Sliced jicama. On a stick.

Genius takes popsicle form in this crunchy treat that is oh-so-fresca. Jicaleta is, unsurprisingly, the lovechild of the ice lolly, paleta, and the beloved jicama fruit. 

Jicaleta is often sold by street vendors next to trays and trays of powdered sugar in unicorn shades. They may resemble the sand-art stations of your younger years, but don’t be fooled – these sour treats pack a bite. The jicama is first slathered in chamoy syrup, then tossed in a cascade of colored sugar. Oooof.

This fearsome Diablito from the depths of hell.

Credit: @Badabun / Twitter

The name ‘little devil’ does kinda give it away. They’re pica, hell-fire red and may or may not make you cry. 

This spicy cocktail is usually made from crushed lime or mango flavored ice, Taijin, chamoy, lemon and salt. They’re often garnished with a Tama Roca straw, dried fruit – whatever else you like really, as long as it’s outrageous. Evil has never tasted so good. 

This OTT elote from Elotes Asados San Rafael.

Credit: Jose Fernandez / Facebook

Looking a little somewhere between a hunk of corn on the cob and fried chicken, these are not your regular elote fare. These elotes have the dial turned up on extra. 

Maybe it’s coating them in crunchy Dorito crumbs or taki dust, maybe it’s smothering them in chipotle sauce, cheese and carne asada. The one in the photo comes from a little stall called Elotes Asados San Rafael Tamaulipas, Mexico, that has become a local sensation for their outlandish elote creations. They supposedly sell 200 – 300 of their wacky flavors a day. 

This glistening bag of Dorilotes.

Credit: Edgar Zavala / Facebook

Elote in a bag of Doritos chips was always going to be a good idea. Dorilotes is similar to Dorilocos, except that the corn is non-negotiable. This doesn’t really need much explanation, just gaze upon it. Mmmmmm.

These never-to-be-underestimated, pepino locos.

Credit: @Badabun / YouTube

Whoever said cucumbers were mild and meek?

These Mexican pepinos locos are hollowed-out cucumbers that are crusted with chamoy, then stuffed with jicama and tamarind candy and Japanese peanuts. They look like little cups, so it’s no wonder they’re sometimes served with clamato inside. 

These monstrous Sandias Locas.

The distant cousin of the pepino loco, the best bit of the sandia (watermelon) loca is probably its XXL capacity. And that means all the more room for madness – whether it’s fruits, pepino, Tama Roca tamarindo, scoops of ice cream, Corona bottles – whatever floats your boat. Don’t forget the chamoy and Salsaghetti candy. 

This very intriguing Chocodilla de Baby Ruth.

Credit: Pinterest

Guatemalan Taco Bell really outdid itself when they introduced the chocodilla de Baby Ruth a few years back. Whilst it does sound a little like a 4am drunken reaction to an empty pantry, we can also imagine it being really, reaaaally delicious. This flour tortilla is filled with a smushed American candy bar made of peanuts, caramel, milk chocolate-flavored nougat and more chocolate.

Giving the people what they never really asked for, but are for damn sure going to try anyway. 

This lip-smacking chilindrina chicharron.

Credit: @CampecheHoy / Instagram

It takes one hot mess to know one, and these chilindrina chicharrónes are absolutely to die for. It’s a colourful party on top and that’s definitely not pita bread underneath. 

Fried pork skin is used as the base for a mouth-watering mixture of chopped lettuce, sliced avocado, tomatoes, and the cheese, limon and sourcream that tops it all off.

This visual masterpiece that is salchipapas Colombiana.

Credit: @Mr. Full / Facebook

If this bowl isn’t art, we don’t know what is. 

Salchipapas typically involve a lot of thinly sliced pan-fried sausages mixed with a ton of French fries. Throw a savory coleslaw on top, and add in whatever you please to the mix – it could be fried egg, corn, cheese, plantain slices and much more. You’ll usually get a real mix of sauces too – including ketchup, mustard and olive sauce. Just be prepared to get messy

Mr. Full is a restaurant in Barranquilla, Colombia that’s responsible for gigantic trays of salchipapa, and towering piles of other junk food. Go feast your eyes here

This majestic Guacamaya de León. 

Credit: lossaboresdemexico.com

These monsters are said to originate from Guanajuato, Mexico and are a treat to whip up at home. 

The bolillos are toasted so that they’re golden and crispy on the outside, then slices of avocado are added, or smushed on the sides of the bread. It’s then packed with slabs of chicharron pork crackling until breaking point – then all topped off with a delicious spicy salsa. 

These sweet Marquesita darlings.

Credit: CocinaVital.Mx

Is it a crepe? Is it a waffle cone? Nah, it’s an amazing Yucatan street food that’s made from pouring batter into a heating iron, and adding sweet or savory fillings! Take a bite and you could find anything from cajeta and lechera, to ham and cheese inside. 

We dare you to have just one. 

Last but definitely not least… this. Whatever this is:

Credit: @Badbun / Facebook

READ: Latinos Never Do Basic Snacks And These Elotes And Esquites Prove Why They Are The Greatest Snacks

15 Carne Asada Recipes That Will Have You Drooling Before The End Of This Post

Culture

15 Carne Asada Recipes That Will Have You Drooling Before The End Of This Post

Maica

There are few hard and fast rules on how to make delicious carne asada. Over its long history as carnivorous Latinos’ favorite meaty treat, carne asada has been through many transformations. If you’re making carne asada for the first time there are three key things you must know. 

Sure your papa or tío probably shared their wisdom with you but here is our some of ours.

First, the cut of beef (skirt or flank) must be marinated and seasoned by a pro. Second, the meat must be cooked on a grill or skillet that’s so hot it screams. And third, the meat must be properly rested and thinly sliced before serving.

With the ground rules out the way, here are 15 carne asada recipes guaranteed to get you drooling before you know it.

1) The Simple Carne Asada

Credit: Mexican Food Journal

There are many ways to make a carne asada marinade but many swear by simplicity. At it’s most basic, a simple carne asada marinade is made from oil, salt, pepper, garlic, and lime juice. Nothing more. Let the meat chill in the marinade for at least 4 hours and return to room temperature before you slap it on the grill.

2) The Classic Carne Asada 

Credit: Isabeleats.com

There’s simple and then there’s classic. This carne asada recipe from Isabel Eats follows the recipe the author remembers from her childhood. To the oil, lime, garlic, and seasoning in the simple marinade above, Isabel adds a good handful of chopped cilantro, a chopped jalapeno, white wine vinegar, chilli powder, dried oregano, and cumin.

3) Carne Asada with a Citrus Punch

Credit: RainbowJewels at All Recipes

This crowd-sourced recipe for carne asada takes the basic carne asada marinade above and adds a whole host of other flavors, including a major glug of citrus juice. Lime juice, lemon juice, and orange juice go into this marinade, along with chopped chipotle pepper, coriander seeds and cumin. This recipe recommends flank steak or skirt steak and suggests you regularly massage the meat while it’s marinating!

4) Port Wine and Ginger Carne Asada

Credit: All Recipes

Ever thought about adding a ¼ cup of honey, some grated ginger and a cup of port wine to your carne asada marinade? Well now’s the time to give it a try! This recipe for flank steak with a port wine marinade is essentially port wine carne asada. Searing the meat on a smoking hot outside grill cooks the wine off nicely, leaving a sticky, sweet coating behind.

5) Spicy Carne Asada with Fish Sauce

Credit: A Spicy Perspective

According to the author, this Mexico-inspired carne asada from A Spicy Perspective is a fast, healthy low-carb meal. This recipe is also packed with flavor and easy to prepare. For this marinade, you need to add ancho chilli powder and habanero chiles to the usual ingredients like garlic, cilantro, and lime. These two types of chilli give the recipe a kick. But it’s the addition of fish sauce that adds a vivid umami flavor to the meat that will have your guests coming back to the grill for second and third helpings.

6) Carne Asada Tacos

Credit: Food Network

And now, a true Mexican rule to live by. If in doubt, put it in a taco. The Food Network recommends marinating your steak in a simple Mojo (marinade) that includes two tablespoons of white vinegar and a whole jalapeno for 8 hours. Any more and the meat begins to break down and loses its texture. Once cooked, pile the meat on top of warmed tortillas, sprinkle with lettuce, onion, and cheese and finish with Pico de Gallo salsa.

7) Roy Choi’s Carne Asada

Credit: NY Times

Now we’re going to get a little fancy with this take on carne asada from LA chef and Kogi BBQ founder Roy Choi. A number of ingredients set this recipe apart. Take the classic carne asada recipe, lose the cumin and oregano and add mirin, beer, chopped tomato, and onion. Roy recommends a coal-fired grill to get a good crisp on the outer edges of the meat.

8) Carne Asada with Soy Sauce

Credit: Damn Delicious

This popular recipe from Chungah at Damn Delicious keeps things simple but adds one key ingredient – soy sauce. Seasoning is a very important and every good carne asada cook has a salt grinder on hand. But soy sauce adds a richer flavor that cannot be achieved through salt alone. Chungah quite rightly uses flank steak and cooks the meat for only six minutes to keep the dish nice and rare.

9) Vegan Jackfruit Carne Asada

Credit: The Nut Free Vegan

For our vegan friends, this carne asada recipe replaces beef steak with jackfruit. Jackfruit is a tropical fruit native to South India that has a fibrous, meaty texture when cooked. Shredded jackfruit often pops up on vegan menus as an alternative to pulled pork but when doused in a spicy citrus marinade it can pass for a tasty vegan carne asada! This recipe recommends baking the jackfruit, rather than grilling it but throwing the marinated fruit on the grill should work just as well. 

10) Carne Asada Salad

Credit: Skinny Taste

Carne asada goes beautifully with fresh salad vegetables. This salad recipe from Skinny Taste shows you how to incorporate juicy strip steak into a fresh summer salad. The carne asada is treated to a simple marinade and grilled in the usual way. Once rested and sliced, the meat is thrown onto a bed of salad leaves, covered with homemade Pico de Gallo and doused with the juice of an entire lime.

11) Carne Asada Fries

Credit: Downshiftology

Everything in moderation. If you’re eating the salad, you can also eat the fries! To make carne asada fries, prepare a half portion of carne asada using the classic carne asada recipe above (number 2). Make a batch of fries; either from scratch using russet potatoes and a deep fryer or by short cut using oven fries. Sprinkle grated cheese and a teaspoon of paprika over the fries, pile on the carne asada and finish with a dollop of guacamole. Heaven.

12) Carne Asada Burrito Casserole

Credit: Claire Lower at Lifehacker

Trust Lifehacker to come up with a recipe you didn’t know you wanted. Essentially a layered casserole with carne asada and all the ingredients you’d need for a burrito cooked together in the oven, this carne asada burrito casserole is not elegant but it sure is tasty. 

13) Carne Asada con Rajas

Credit: James Ransom at Food52

Food52 enjoys its carne asada con rajas, which means carne asada with sliced peppers. The most refined recipe on this list, carne asada con rajas requires a fairly complex marinade that includes brown sugar, cumin, and ancho chilli powder. Once the steak has been marinated, cooked and rested, you can start on the rajas. Saute poblano pepper and onions in olive oil, add minced garlic then finish with fresh oregano and a dollop of heavy cream. 

14) Keto Carne Asada and Chimichurri

Credit; I Breathe I’m Hungry

If you’re following a keto, low carb, paleo or dairy-free diet, this recipe is the one for you. This keto carne asada marinadefeatures healthy ingredients like avocado oil, cider vinegar, and cayenne pepper and the side of Chimichurri sauce is much lighter than the usual sides of rice and tortillas. Net carbs per serving: 0g!

15) The Ultimate Carne Asada 

Credit:  J. Kenji López-Alt at Serious Eats

And to finish, the ultimate carne asada recipe from Serious Eats. This recipe combines everything we’ve learned from the recipes above and incorporates it into the ultimate carne asada experience. Three types of fresh chilli (ancho, guajillo, chipotle), a whole load of citrus, soy sauce and fish sauce go into this marinade. The result is a slab of grilled meat that’s buttery, salty, sweet and absolutely delicious.

Paid Promoted Stories