culture

Buying These Gifts Gives Back To The Latino Community While Making You Look Like A Rock Star

mitú

Consumerism is always in full swing during the holiday season, but you don’t have to feel discouraged by your dwindling bank account. If you don’t have time to thrift your gifts this year, turn to these products that promise to give back to organizations like TransLatina, the Trevor Project, and disaster relief efforts.

Grab the bull by the horns and gift gifts that give back to the Latino community one way or another.

California Brut Sparkling Wine Rainbow Glitter Edition | $59

CREDIT: “California Brut Sparkling Wine Rainbow Glitter Edition” Digital Image. One Hope. 4 December 2018.

You already know the occasion to bring this full-bodied green apple, pear and peach noted bubbly wine. Proceeds go to the Trevor Project, a crisis helpline for LGBTQ Youth. Half of the homeless youth in Los Angeles are LGBTQ, many of whom are Latino. Give back and drink up.

Basic Witch Bracelet | $17

CREDIT: SoRahJewelry / Etsy

Proceeds from this Etsy store all go to organizations that resist the Trump organization. This bracelet helps kids at the Mexico border, trans people, all while validating the bruja in su prima.

Juniper IPA Beer Soap | $14

CREDIT: “Juniper IPA Beer Soap”. Digital Image. Society B. 4 December 2018.

At Society B, you can shop their collection and select from a variety of charities to give 10% of your purchase back to. That means this bear soup can give back to organizations like water.org, which helps bring water to people all over the world, including Central and South America.

Quiejel Vintage Embroidered Strap | $98

CREDIT: Untitled. Digital Image. Hiptipico. 4 December 2018.

This camera strap is not only beautiful but it is hand embroidered by female artisans in the villages around Chichicastenango, Guatemala.

The founder emphasizes on her website that she works for the artisans, not the other way around.

“I started Hiptipico to help create dignified job opportunities for Maya artisans. They want to sell their goods and my job is to help find them clients.”

Embroidered iPad Case | $98

CREDIT: Untitled. Digital Image. Hiptipico. 4 December 2018.

Don’t have a camera enthusiast in your life? Support these artisans with this one of a kind iPad case.

Atticus Beanie | $38

CREDIT: Untitled. Digital Image. Krochet Kids. 4 December 2018.

Why support a fast fashion brand that won’t even keep your boo’s head warm. This beanie was hand crocheted by a Peruvian woman using Peruvian wool and organic cotton, and she was paid fairly for her work.

Queer Latino Pride Camiseta | $25

CREDIT: we are mitú

mitú stands with Queer Latino/Latina/Latinx Pride! 100% of earnings will be donated to TransLatina in Los Angeles & FIERCE in New York.

Not Today Satan Bracelet | $18

CREDIT: “Not Today Satan Bracelet”. Digital Image. One Token. 4 December 2018.

Life Token allows you to customize bracelets in any language, and you can specify at checkout which charity you want to donate to. We recommend TransLatina, which strives to get legislation and mobilization of the Trans Latina community all over the country.

Hand Woven All Cotton Tablecloth and Napkin Set, ‘Sunny Rooster’ | $70

CREDIT: Untitled. Digital Image. UNICEF. 4 December 2018.

Gift your mom an all-new, hand embroidered table linen set and prepare to be immediately splashed with holy water. Support Central American artisan Eladio Chiroy and help UNICEF give 54 doses of measles vaccines to kiddos. Tu eres Santo.

Hand Blown Beer Glasses with Amber Handle and Rim | $73

CREDIT: Untitled. Digital Image. UNICEF. 4 December 2018.

Tell your uncle to throw away his grimy old mugs and give him these hand-blown glass beer glasses. On top of supporting artisans Javier Gutiérrez and Efrén Canteras, your purchase can help UNICEF vaccinate 89 children against polio. Drink for a cause.

2019 Corgis for a Cause Calendar | $20

CREDIT: Untitled. Digital Image. Corgis For a Cause. 4 December 2018.

These corgis that stare back up at your friend all year long helped provide relief for animals affected by hurricanes last year in Texas, Florida, and Puerto Rico.

Siestas For Fiestas Blanket | $45

CREDIT: Untitled. Screenshot. Siestas for Fiestas. 4 December 2018.

Mexican husband and wife duo Chris and Jesenia have teamed up with a pastor in Cancun, Mexico, to help feed families at Christmas. Every blanket purchased gives a family a rotisserie chicken, vegetables and dinner rolls that they can bring home to their family on Christmas.

Socks That Provide Relief Kits | $15

CREDIT: Untitled. Digital Image. Conscious Step 4 December 2018.

Conscious Step sells socks that target specific causes. These benefit Oxfam, which helps provide relief kits to those immediately impacted by natural disaster. With climate change expected to affect the Caribbean, give to an organization that reliably provided relief in Puerto Rico and will continue to do so.

We The People Socks | $15

CREDIT: Untitled. Digital Image. ACLU. 4 December 2018.

While we’re talking socks, encourage that burgeoning woke primita to never get cold feet. She’s of the people, and repping an organization that won’t back down to the Trump administration.

Immigrants We Get the Job Done Camiseta | $30

CREDIT: “Immigrants We Get the Job Done — Women’s T-Shirt” Digital Image. Feminist Apparel. 4 December 2018.

Feminist Apparel pays out their artists in perpetuity, which means that an immigrant artist is benefiting from this purchase. Plus, 10 percent of profits are donated to organizations like the ACLU, which has singlehandedly overthrown family separation policies and Muslim bans through their federal lawsuits.

Pinecone Charm Bangle | $14

CREDIT: Untitled. Digital Image. Alex and Ani. 4 December 2018.

Alex and Ani is owned by an Armenian woman who sells charm bracelets that are dedicated to specific charities. That means you can choose between ASPCA and (RED) organizations and double gift this season. This bracelet goes to Plan International, which aims to educate girls around the world, but is concentrated on Central America.

Climate Woke Crewneck T-shirt | $28

CREDIT: “Image of Climate Woke Crewneck T-shirt” Digital Image. Culture Strike. 4 December 2018.

You’re going to want to support CultureStrike, the nonprofit that hosts a pro-migrant artist collective. They organize social disruptions using beautiful, impactful artwork and touch every issue that affects Latinos. From immigration to LGBTQ protections to climate change, you’re funding the world.

Feel Good Pack | $45

CREDIT: “Feel Good Pack” Digital Image. Pura Vida Bracelets. 4 December 2018.

Pura Vida Bracelets was founded in Costa Rica and provides jobs to artisans in Costa Rica. At the same time, it’s committed to donating 10 percent of sales to charities. To date, they’ve donated $1.5 million to 175 charity partners that range from San Diego Pride to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America.

Somos Más Tee | $27

CREDIT: “Image of Somos Más Tee” Digital Image. Voto Latino. 4 December 2018.

Make sure your progressive primo opens this up before the gun crazed primo Viejo comes through and support Voto Latino. According to the website, “The SOMOS MÁS campaign is a national, multi-generational, multi-year effort to engage and inspire young potential American Latino voters who don’t see themselves in the political process but strongly value their family and community.”

Black Si Se Puede Polo | $30

CREDIT: “Black Si Se Puede Polo” Digital Image. Chavez Center Store. 4 December 2018.

Support your favorite nerd Mexicano padre with this embroidered polo. The proceeds entirely support the Chavez Foundation, which preserves his memorial and creates awareness services around the country, educated kids about Mexican-American history.


READ: Your Siblings Won’t Be Able To Thank You Enough If You Buy Them Any Of These Gifts This Year

Share this story with all of your friends by tapping that little share button below!

15 Stereotypes About Foreigners Visiting Latin America

culture

15 Stereotypes About Foreigners Visiting Latin America

Getty Images

Oh, stereotypes. What would intercultural relations be without a few simple-minded preconceptions of foreigners? Stereotypes surrounding gringos who visit Latin America are numerous. Some of them are actually a bit true, but, like most black-and-white views of the world, most are a huge exaggeration.

Tourism from the United States, Canada, and Western Europe brings considerable income to Latin American countries. Commercial relations between the Anglo countries and Latin countries have always been a cornerstone of the economy. So it is pretty common to spot rubios y rubias in the region. Here are some stereotypes that are common and sort of chistosos.

1. They fall for all the tourist traps
Real? A bit, but not too much. 

Credit: 0a94b0c0bc05108d9763972a93f4f2a2. Digital image. Pinterest

People believe that all foreigners will walk into the first establishment that offers crappy food and mediocre musicians performing “local” music. Fact is that most tourists are well-informed, particularly in the age of the internet. Ranking systems like Expedia and sites like Lonely Planet often advice against falling for the infamous tourist traps.

2. They are scared OF EVERYTHING
Real? Nope, not at all.

Credit: robbery-thief-robber-burglar-steal-money-bag-vector-20804951.  Digital image. Vector Stock

There is a misconception that gringos are afraid to go out because of the insecurity that plagues many big cities in Latin America (that is sadly true). Fact is, the contrary generally happens: many tourists fill emboldened and do not take the necessary precautions. Gladly there are always good, honest locals to guide them.

3. They encounter poverty for the first time and ask why people just don’t “work more” to solve it
Real? YES

Credit: mexico-poverty. Digital image. International Business Times

This is VERY common. When encountering poverty in the continent, many foreigners naively ask why people don’t just do more work, implying that locals are lazy. That is not how disadvantage works, compadre.

4. They just cannot consume spicy food
Real? NOT.AT.ALL

Credit: 150804122715-chili-peppers-large-169. Digital image. CNN

Most cosmopolitan cities are exposed to food from around the world, so many foreginers are well-seasoned eaters. Many can, in fact, out-chili the most daring Latino. Other foods that are widely consumed in the United States, such as Indian or Sichuan, have even more chili than, say, Mexican, so be prepared before you challenge a foreigner on a chili eating contest.

5. Foreigners are damn funny!
Real? Por supuesto

Credit: 43679_0. Digital image. eBay

Foreigners have la fama of being bien chistosos once that have a beer or two on them. Well, this is true… particularly when they attempt to wishiwashear songs in Spanish! Foreignerss that are definitely not funny, however: spring breakers who trash hotel rooms and throw up on the street como Pedro por su casa.

6. They walk around disinfecting EVERYTHING
Real? Partially

Credit: 84abb89cc44588566b56dafcc6a25d242eb67af01beeda90ac93923cc9266b26. Digital image. QuickMeme.

One of the biggest fears that foreign visitors have in Latin American countries is catching diseases. They walk around with a disinfectant in their purse and drink bottled water even in five-star resorts. A little precaution is fine, but too much actually turns insulting.

7. Some expect everyone to speak English
Real? In many cases, yes

Credit: american-tourists. Digital image. Modern Diplomacy

The worst tourists get offended when not everyone bows to them and speaks English. When someone asks you if English is your second language as if to insult you, just elegantly say: “Yes, actually, yes, and what is yours?” Even though English is one of the dominant languages in the world, so is Spanish.

8. But some really make an effort to speak broken Spanish
Real? Claro!

Credit: 43b14ffa92791f6259d172c05912405ba09fa23f. Digital image. Smashwords

Many awesome visitors make a huge effort to prepare before their trips and spend months learning basic words and phrases and actually attending Spanish school. We have met many that totally try to immerse themselves in the language and culture. Bien por ellos.

9. Older foreign couples fall in love with cute little towns and move there to open an B&B
Real? Yes!

Credit: changing-my-mind-about-san-miguel-de-allende. Digital image. The Travels of Bbqboy and Spanky

Towns like San Miguel de Allende in Mexico have become retiree central. Many couples buy a property and turn it into their dream business. They live an Eat Pray Love life well into their seventies, creating employment in the meantime. A win-win situation. These type of resting spots have become famous for celebrities like Johnny Depp, who made San Miguel his go-to place for chilling out in the early 2000s.

10. Young wild foreigners leave everything behind and open beach bars…. livin’ la vida loca
Real? Yep

Credit: zenzi-beach-bar-and-restaurant-at-calle—v6195748-720. Digital image. Oyster Hotel Reviews

Just like their older counterparts open chill Bed and Breakfast venues, young foreigners, many of which try to escape corporate life, open beach bars in places like Belize and Costa Rica. They live a life of sand, booze and one night stands. They change the suit for the rastas and become central figures in expat communities. Problem is: most of these expat bars are not intended for the locals, so there is not much attachment to the land.

11. Foreigners, in general, cannot sunbath without ending up like camarones
Real? Hahahaha

Credit: Sunburnt-Shoulders. Digital image. Scuba Monkey

It is not uncommon to see unprepared foreigners rojos como shrimps or a mandril’s butt. This is a bit funny, but also dangerous and something that should be discussed. Skin cancer is the real deal: wear sunscreen, chaparritos. It is not uncommon to see foreigners lather themselves with coconut oil to get a tan, a very dangerous practice that actually burns skin cells beyond repair.

12. They will eventually run to the first McDonald’s they see
Real? Nah

Credit: McDonalds_cropped. Digital image. Josh Healey

Even though sometimes foreigners need the comfort of their food, not all go to Mackers for a Big Mac fix. Part of traveling is eating and most foreigners know this. Tacos, enchiladas, chiles en nogada… bring on the Pepto Bismol!

13. They ask for the Mexican, Chilean or Cuban word for whatever comes to their mind.. It’s Spanish, so.
Real? Sadly, yes

Credit: the-spanish-language. Digital image. K International

Many foreigners believe that people in Latin America speak… Mexican… Argentinian… Cuban…. and even though we all speak different variants of Spanish, we are united by a single mother tongue.

14. “I know a guy called Juan in New York, he is also from Colombia, do you know him?” Dude, there are millions of Colombians.
Real? Yes, and it is damn funny

Credit: d1566_066295-c1c3e05c-1236-11e4-ae81-95568c4ed36e. Digital image. The Apricity

It is true and super funny. Would you ask a gringo is he knows a John in Missouri? No last name, no other indicator… just John. No, right? Well, many americanos are sure that every single person of Latino origin must know each other. Oh, it is so silly it is kinda cute.

15. They think the whole region is either a tropical paradise or a godforsaken desert
Real? Carajo, esto pasa muy seguido

Credit: Arbol_de_Piedra. Digital image. Never Ending Voyage

The geographical reputation of the whole region is that every single landscape is either a desert where Speedy Gonzalez roams around, or a tropical Brazilian rainforest with massive iguanas. Well, Latin America does have those types of places, but also forests, snowy mountains and everything in between. Learn some geography, guys, it is not that hard.

Paid Promoted Stories