Culture

Here’s Why Frida Kahlo’s Style Was Cyclical And Ever-Changing Flirting With Femininity And Masculinity

Frida Kahlo is an iconic member of the Latino community. As an artist, she continues to inspire millions of people from around the world. She stood up for herself and her sexuality in a time when people just didn’t allow for people to be themselves. Kahlo is a controversial figure at times but, overall, she shows the world that we can do anything we want as long s we have the drive and determination to get there.

Her style is one thing everyone remembers about the artist. She was a fashion icon without trying. Everyone has seen Kahlo in her floral crowns and dresses. We also know her in her suits and cropped hair. Her drastic changes in her style were all intentional.

Frida Kahlo first started dictating her dress based on her deformities and injuries.

Credit: Monica Elkelv

Kahlo was the victim of several health issues that altered her body. To hide these imperfections, Kahlo altered her clothing to create illusions that hid the physical manifestations of her health issues.

One clothing alteration Kahlo relied on was a heel on her right shoe.

Credit: Ishiuehi Migako

As a young child, Kahlo contracted polio in her right leg. The disease, which has been largely eradicated in the world thanks to vaccinations, caused her right leg to be smaller than her left leg.

She also layered her socks to help hid her right leg.

Credit: Guillermo Kahlo

Her ingenuity with her clothing and her vision on how to create the form she wanted you to see is very telling. Her art was something she clearly always felt.

Young Kahlo would also wear her suits to challenge society.

Credit: Guillermo Kahlo

She refused to be defined by society and the mainstream vision of femininity and womanhood. She wanted to be defined as herself and wearing a suit provided the artist with a way to stand up for herself.

Diego Rivera was a major factor in how the artist portrayed herself to the world.

Credit: Frida Kahlo “Frida And Diego Rivera

When Rivera and Kahlo were together, Kahlo wore flowers in her hair and traditional Mexican dresses. She offered Rivera what he thought was beautiful.

Kahlo’s life without Rivera saw her living as the opposite of his desires.

Creidt: Frida Kahlo Portrait With Cropped Hair

When Rivera, who was frequently cheating on Kahlo, was out of Kahlo’s life, she would wear suits and cut her hair short. She knew that Rivera disliked her looking like this so she intentionally did so to displease him when they were apart.

Kahlo’s style evolution was cyclical and ever-changing. She constantly blurred the line between femininity and masculinity always leaving society scratching their heads.

Watch the video of Frida Kahlo’s style below.

READ: For Frida Kahlo’s Birthday This Is An Ode To All Of The Cakes Made In Her Honor

Frida Kahlo’s Casa Azul Is Celebrating Her 113th Birthday With A Week Full Of Digital Events

Culture

Frida Kahlo’s Casa Azul Is Celebrating Her 113th Birthday With A Week Full Of Digital Events

Museo Frida Kahlo / Getty Images

Happy Birthday Frida! Were the iconic Mexican artist alive today, she would be celebrating her 113th birthday. Few artists have captured the imagination of the world as Frida Kahlo did – both in life and in death.

The iconic Mexican artist lived a unique life full of success and heartache, which has truly helped create a strong fan base around the world. These days, Frida is still hailed as a feminist, LGBTQ+, and Chicano icon, the beloved artist continues to live on in the hearts of those who love her.

Frida Kahlo’s 113th birthday is full of free events that will help you remember her iconic legacy.

People in Mexico and around the world have shown an enormous interest in learning about the life and work of Frida Kahlo – the iconic Mexican artist. People are eager to learn more about the house where she lived, and which today is the Casa Azul; hear about her diary and how she painted despite her health problems, and learn more about her marriage to the muralist Diego Rivera and their unique relationship.

Well, if Frida Kahlo is also one of your favorite artists – you’re in luck! Her former home, the Casa Azul, has prepared a calendar of events and special activities that you’ll be able to attend from the comfort and safety of your own home.

The events will run from July 6-16 and thousands have already logged on to enjoy workshops, readings, and concerts – all free and online. Through the museum’s Facebook and YouTube profiles, this party can be closely followed along with acts by the Mexican tenor Benito Rodríguez, the soprano Olivia Gorra, the flute player Horacio Franco, the Pasatono orchestra and the Opera Studio Beckmann.

Frida’s Casa Azul will be hosting the events, where she called home for much of her life.

Credit: thatgaygringo / Instagram

Frida Kahlo was born Magdalena Carmen Frida Kahlo Calderón on July 6, 1907 and died on July 13, 1954. She spent much of her life at Casa Azul, in Mexico City’s Coyoacán neighborhood, so it’s no surprise that the museum has decided to celebrate the big day. In fact, it’s between those walls she was born and died.

Obviously, with the continued threat of Covid-19, the museum has decided to host all events online. In an interview with Milenio, museum director Hilda Trujillo said “Culture and art are an indispensable part of the life of society, as has been demonstrated during the Coronavirus pandemic. For this reason, we designed the program ‘Go for Frida!’ in which the Frida Kahlo Museum goes online to request the support of society, so that they can support us with donations to continue creating content for the whole world and continue to highlight Mexico’s art and culture.”

The series of events started on July 6 but will run through July 16 – here’s all the details you need to know about.

Credit: Casa Azul

The program kicked off on July 6 (Frida’s actual birthday) with a concert streamed on the museum’s YouTube channel. But over the ten-day period, the museum will also host various workshops, a reading of Frida Kahlo’s personal diaries, and a drawing contest.

Along with these activities, Casa Azul launched an online donation campaign. This is to help the cultural institution, which closed its doors on March 21 because of the Coronavirus and isn’t expected to reopen until September.

And don’t forget: the Frida Kahlo Museum also has a virtual tour. You can even view the museum’s collection through Google Arts & Culture. So you have no excuses to not celebrate Frida Kahlo birthday and rediscover her legacy.

Frida Kahlo Fans Are Tweeting Stunning Images Of The Artist On Her Birthday And Get Ready To Swoon

Fierce

Frida Kahlo Fans Are Tweeting Stunning Images Of The Artist On Her Birthday And Get Ready To Swoon

@SfiZhdc/ Twitter

Break out the party hats and flower crowns, mi gente!

One hundred and thirteen years ago today, on July 6 Mexican artist Frida Kahlo was born at her family home called La Casa Azul. As one of the most recognized figures in art history, Kahlo has a legacy that continues to be embraced even decades after her death. Hailed as a feminist, LGBTQ+, and Chicano icon, the beloved artist continues to live on in the hearts of those who love her.

This truth is particularly apparent this year. Sixty-six years after her death, Kahlo’s friends are celebrating her birthday, so much so that #HappyBirthdayFrida is trending on Twitter with some of the most amazing artwork.

Such as…

This beautiful graphic of the artist totally in her element.

And this photograph of the artist in all of her glory.

Just look at Kahlo in this beautiful self-portrait.

This brilliantly beautiful portrait of Kahlo being an artist.

This very sweet piece of fan art.

And this boldly painted piece in a unique style.

While this one isn’t an image we love the English National Ballet for sharing this one.

You’ve got to love the 3D aspects of this one.

This divine portrait shows the beauty in all of her glory.

And finally, this passionate virtual piece really makes us wonder what Kahlo would have done with new mediums if she was alive today.

Happy Birthday, Frida!