Culture

Three Latinas Are Trying To Give Conchas A National Day

Because every day should be concha day.

Three Latinas started a campaign on Change.org urging California Governor Jerry Brown to recognize December 8th as National Concha Day.

As most of us already know, conchas are a staple of Mexican tradition for Día de los Muertos, Christmas, and… every day if you’re in abuelita’s kitchen.

As conchas have gained more fame in Latino pop culture, three Latina foodies decided to take action to give conchas their own day to shine and 1,700 people have agreed.

Seventeen hundred proud concha lovers have already signed the petition.


The campaign needs a total of 2,500 signatures for Governor Jerry Brown to be presented with the request.

Some are signing the petition because conchas are much more than just pan dulce.

CREDIT: change.org

They are literally life.

Others have a sentimental connection to the beloved pan dulce.

CREDIT: change.org

But for most people, the concha is a representation of Latino culture.

CREDIT: change.org

Jessica Resendíz, one of the women who started this petition, says dedicating an entire day to the concha only makes sense.

“There’s a national day for everything: donuts, pizza, tacos! Why not one for pan dulce? I grew up having conchitas con chocolate. This would mean everything to us if it happens. In honor, we would celebrate with an event featuring local vendors, music, dance and of course conchitas con cafécito.”

– Jessica from @raggedytiff

For Karla Jimenez, another founder of this petition, National Concha Day would be a victory the Latino community as a whole.

“If National Concha Day was a reality it would mean another stepping stone, another reminder of the power and reach of our community. And of course it would be so much fun! We can foresee the awesome events and attention to local business and panaderías.”

– Karina Jimenez from @vivaloscupcakes

As for how Alicia Becerra, the third petition starter, would celebrate if National Concha Day became official:

“I would celebrate National Concha Day by taking my kids to our local panadería. We will eat conchas along with a warm cup of champurrado and share stories about their late Abuela Doña Concha that they never fully got to know.”

– Alicia from @aliciasdelicias

So why December 8th? December 8th is known in Mexico as Día de la Concepcion, and Concha is often used as a nickname for the name Concepcion.

READ: Take This Personality Quiz And Find Out Which Pan Dulce You Are


To help make National Concha Day a reality check out the change.org petition here and tell us what National Concha Day would mean to you in the comments below.

For the love of conchas, don’t forget to click the share button below!

Here Are 13 Interesting Facts About The History And Symbolism Of Pan De Muerto

Culture

Here Are 13 Interesting Facts About The History And Symbolism Of Pan De Muerto

PanDeFuego / Instagram

The yearly calendar for Mexican social life pretty much is dictated by baked goods. You know the year is wrapping up when bakeries and supermarkets start stocking traditional pan de muerto, a type of bread that is placed on altars and enjoyed by families around Day of the Dead. It is a delicious, spongy delicacy that tastes like brioche but has a distinctive smell, product of the orange peel and orange blossom essential oils that the traditional recipe calls for. This is what you need to know about pan de muerto. Hey, if you wanna get on your abuela’s good books this is your chance to impress her. 

1. The origins of pan de muerto seem to go back all the way to Aztec times.

Credit: Instagram / breadpanaderos

Of course, the original owners of the land on which Mexico City exists now did not have wheat, eggs and oranges (the main ingredients for pan de muerto) before the Spanish arrived. Rather, according to chronicles from the time and some historians, they made a sort of cake with amaranth flour. Some believe that this bread contained blood product of human sacrifices and that it was an offering to the gods. 

2. The Spanish conquistadores changed the recipe, as they found this culinary practice violent and barbaric.

Credit: Instagram / chicayeyemx

During colonial times the Spanish learnt of this practice and changed the recipe (it no longer contained actual dead people’s blood!). The amaranth was replaced with wheat flour and the top was sprinkled with sugar turned red with a colorant, which symbolized blood, an echo of the Aztec tradition. Some bakeries still use red sugar. 

3. So what about the circle in the middle of the bread?

Credit: Instagram / pandefuego

The circle represents a skull, and the elongated pieces of bread stand, of course, for the bones. The skull and bones are the most coveted bits of every pan de muerto, so snatch them as soon as you can (although you might get someone upset, as there is nothing worse than finding a boneless pancito de muerto laying around in the kitchen!). The long bones also symbolize the tears we shed for those who have passed away before us. 

 4. So you have noticed the sesame seeds in lieu of sugar in some panes de muerto?

Credit: Instagram / cielorojomex

Well, that reveals that the bread is from the Mexican state of Puebla, where sesame seeds are sprinkled on top. This has to do with the French influence on culinary affairs, and we all know French bakers like to get creative. 

 5. And in Oaxaca pan de muerto has a completely different shape and actually features a corpss. It’s much less creepy than it sounds.

Credit: Instagram / illsaygiselle

Everything is just a little more elaborate in Oaxaca and pan de muerto is no exception. The Oaxacan variety is made with extra egg yolks and has an anthropomorphic design, complete with a little edible doll which represents the dead. They are simply delicious.  

6. BTW, the orange blossom essence in pan de muerto has a very poetic meaning.

Credit: Instagram / gustobread

Orange blossom has a delicate and comforting smell that inevitably takes us back to the Day of the Dead altars that have been important in our lives. The smell is meant to symbolize the everlasting presence of the faithful departed. It is a sweet celebration of the connection between life and death. 

7. Pan de muerto is a perfect example of contemporary Mexican identity.

Credit: Instagram / laotiliamx

This bread is the epitome of the cultural mish mash that defines contemporary Mexican identity. It has a prehispanic origin with religious connotations, but it has developed into a European food (bread is, after all, a product brought by the colonial power). It is also used in a celebration that fuses ancient indigenous beliefs and Catholic tradition.  

 8. It is round, like the circle of life.

Credit: Instagram / _piggy_back

Its roundness is also a reminder of the cycle of life and death, a cycle that has no definite end and no definite beginning. Indigenous cosmology frames life and death as coexisting and complementing realms. 

 9. If the bones form a cross, they stand for the four cardinal points.

Credit: Instagram / catiabril68

The compass directs each arrow, or bread bone in pan de muerto, to a point ruled by the Aztec gods Quetzalcóatl, Tláloc, Xipe Tútec and Tezcatlipoca. 

10. Panes de muerto are placed on altars so the dead can feast.

Credit: Instagram / lacasadelalolas

Of course, come November 3 you can have the delicious pan for yourself, and if you make a traditional chocolate caliente it will be even better. 

11. Of course, as with everything else, pan de muerto has been gentrified. Just look at this delicious monstrosity.

Credit: Instagram / tresabejas

Yes, we gotta admit that this looks absolutely delicious and we don’t wanna get all puritan when it comes to popular culture (which, far from stable, is a mutating thing), but having melted conejitos (a traditional Mexican chocolate) is a bit too much. Is it Day of the Dead or is it Easter? You can’t always have both! 

12. Oh, hipsters, just sprinkling matcha on absolutely everything! 

Credit: Instagram / weeatmx

Yes, perhaps following the gentrifying wave of Starbucks some Mexican bakeries are starting to add green matcha tea dust in with the traditional sugar. Verde que te quiero verde, hipsters seem to recite in unison. 

13. Can everyone just please stop? Is innovation just killing the true meaning of this Mexican traditional bun?

Credit: Instagram / yerliju

We mean, what fresh hell of deliciousness is this? No, seriously, a pan de muerto hamburger is just a tiny bit over the top, isn’t it?

Concha Skincare Products That Are Better than A Concha

Fierce

Concha Skincare Products That Are Better than A Concha

Conchas hold a special place in our hearts. That soft, sweet bread perfect with cafecito or just as a snack has become one of the Latinidad’s most beloved foods. However, it’s not just our love of eating this pan dulce that has launched it to popularity. Its recognizable shape, scent and flavor has made it the versatile subject of many accessories. Namely, it’s found its way into our favorite body care items. 

Whether it’s a sweet scented concha candle or some concha lip gloss, we love these items. Get ready to add a few of these to your own collection as you check out some of the best concha-themed body care products there are. 

1. Concha Bath Bomb

Instagram / @loquitabathandbody

Loquita Bath and Body is a California-based company that specializes in Latinx and 90’s nostalgia bath products. They’re the company that gave us the famous concha bath bomb. Their concha bath bomb comes in a variety of scents like a chocolate concha, a unicorn concha, a pink concha, and a zombia concha. Drop one of these in your tub and your bathroom will soon smell like the local panderia. 

2. Concha Bath Sponge

Instagram / @loquitabathandbody

Are you in the need for some exfoliation to get your skin to it’s very smoothest and softest? Use this concha bath sponge with your favorite body wash or bath butter and your skin will soon be as sweet as the pan dulce that inspired this product. 

3. Concha Body Oil

Instagram / @loquitabathandbody

If your looking for that final touch before you leave the house, this concha body oil is for you. Spray a fine mist onto your skin and hair and get ready to shimmer like the star you are. It also has the added benefit of a fresh-baked pan dulce scent. 

4. Concha Sugar Scrub

Instagram / @loquitabathandbody

Your skin should be as moisturized as a piece of tres leches. With Loquita’s Concha Sugar Scrub, it will achieve just that effect. You’ll be just as soft as the fresh and delicious concha that you’ll smell like. 

5. Self Conchas Pouch

Instagram / @mitushop

All these concha-inspired body care products need their own place of honor. Stay with the theme by choosing the Mitu Shop’s “Don’t Be Self Conchas” pouch. It’s perfect for toting all your concha-themed goodness wherever you may go. 

6. Concha Lips

Instagram / @glamlite

The iconic pink of a fresh-baked concha now makes for the perfect lip color. A luscious pink liquid lipstick, this concha-inspired formula is long-lasting and will leave your lips looking yummy.

7. Concha Bubble Bar

Instagram / @beaugrimebaby

Beaugrimebaby is another California-based bath and beauty company. They have their own take on concha body care with their concha bubble bar. Available in five scents Cafe con Leche, Agua De Coco, Minty Pan, Rosa Salvaje, and Strawberry the bars bubble up into an incredibly fragrant bubble bath cocktail.

8. Pan Dulce Headband

Etsy / @NicnKai

Before you enjoy some much needed TLC, you gotta get yourself ready. Keep your hair away from your face with this pan dulce printed headband and get ready for a facial, sugar scrub, face mask or whatever pampering you’re into.

9. Stay Golden Heart Concha Soap

Etsy / @EmviBeauty   

EmviBeauty is a Latina-owned bath, beauty and skincare brand from Etsy. Their “Stay Golden Heart Concha Soap” is cruelty-free and vegan. The heart-shaped bar is a blend of fresh almonds, oatmeal, honey, caramelized brown sugar, ripe fig and a touch of musk. 

10. Concha Compact Mirror

Etsy / @LizasBoutique

LizasBoutique is an LA-based Etsy shop that creates unique Latinx-themed jewelry and accessories. Their concha-inspired hand mirror is an adorable and useful addition to your makeup bag.  

11. Concha Candle

Instagram / @ohcomadrecandles

Oh Comadre is a Latina-owned California candle shop. Each scent is lovingly crafted to inspire nostalgia. Their concha candle will make you feel like you just stepped into a cozy bakery. Light this before you use a concha bath bomb or body butter for a super sweet combo.  

12. Chocolate Concha Lip Balm

Instagram / @loquitabathandbody

If you want that concha taste and concha softness, try Loquita’s Chocolate or Vanilla concha lip balms. Nix your petroleum-based lip balms and try this beeswax, sweet almond oil, cocoa butter and castor oil formula for the ultimate in softness. 

13. Concha Lip Scrub

Instagram / @loquitabathandbody

Get your lips kiss-ready with a concha-flavored lip scrub. The brown sugar crystals will exfoliate your lips and get your pout ready for whatever the day might bring. 

14. Concha Whipped Soap

Instagram / @loquitabathandbody

Whipped soap offers moisturizer and a gorgeous scent in a product as luxurious as your skin regiment should be. Use your concha-themed body sponge with this whipped soap in the shower and you’ll come out positively smooth and glowing.