Culture

Starbucks Released A Coquito Frappuccino For The Holidays And Some People Are Very Mad About It

Starbucks loves to make season drinks because, well, they sell. The pumpkin spice latte has transcended the regular life of a coffee beverage and has become a cultural phenomenon that won’t end. The unicorn frappuccino is another example of Starbucks using their reach and money to create timely and quickly forgotten drinks to follow trends. Now, there is a coquito frappuccino that has left the internet divided. Some people are excited to see their culture reach new heights while others can’t wait for it to be over.

This is typically how we are used to seeing coquito.

@lala / Twitter

Either your abuela and tías make it for the family or there is one specific brand that is always bought around this time of year. No matter how it is made or purchased it is always cradled lovingly in your abuela’s arms when you first get to her house for Christmas.

Now, Starbucks is getting in on the trend.

@Starbucks / Twitter

We don’t know how long it will last but the drin is being made by name in the Starbucks’ in Puerto Rico. There are ways to order the drink on the mainland but you have to come prepared with a list of ingredients.

The only online proof of this beverage is in this sign.

@Darleen42499267 / Twitter

The photo has gone viral with people retweeting and sharing the image at lightning speed. Some people are super stoked to get a chance to let their culture shine. Others are over the capitalistic nature of Starbucks using their culture.

Gentrification has been a major issue raised by those bothered by this drink.

@call_me_lexxi / Twitter

The drink is similar to their eggnog frappuccino just with some coconut added to imitate the flavor of coquito.

There are people we are delighted that their proud Puerto Rican culture is being celebrated.

@candace_pedraza / Twitter

Starbucks has publicly acknowledged that they wanted to change their image since the pumpkin spice latte has been deemed super basic. This is a start in that campaign to be more than just basic drinks for basic people.

A few Puerto Ricans on Twitter quickly mocked those who were so upset about the drink.

@morrisseysucks / Twitter

It really isn’t offensive for someone to make foods inspired by different cultures. Fusion cuisines exist because people feel an appreciation to the foods and look to make them as delicious as they can.

A whole other sector is just straight up laughing at the idea.

@AverageGirlT / Twitter

It is pretty interesting that the coquito drink would be available in Puerto Rico where you can get real coquito anywhere. When will the drink come to New York for the Puerto Rican community living there?

Some of the Puerto Rican diasporas is even asking that Starbucks expand the flavor.

@jetwithjen / Twitter

Understandable. There is a huge Puerto Rican population in Orlando and those people would probably love the idea of a nice coquito frappuccino on the way to work.

Starbucks is still testing the Puerto Rican market.

@Starbucks / Twitter

We have no idea how successful it is and we can’t seem to find any promotional material online. If it is successful, however, we need this on the mainland ASAP.

Let me tell you the ingredients for Starbucks coquito.

@MisterrPenguin / Twitter

It’s white mocha syrup and coconut syrup with a sprinkle of cinnamon on top. It’s not close to the real coquito but when you produce things in mass without the culture nuances, this is what it look like.

Many people are asking where the rum at?

@marielaregal / Twitter

The reason we all love coquito so much is because it kicks off the party. Obviously, Starbucks won’t be selling boozy coquito but the people can dream, right?

Some people are truly torn over the drink.

@WinkWinkWinki / Twitter

Tourists may have a coquito frappuccino to taste the famous drink instead of buying it from a local vendor. People might argue that it’s a money-making gimmick but some people might really appreciate the idea.

The vast majority of dissenters are asking if the cultural appropriation will benefit anyone besides Starbucks.

@beatzmarz / Twitter

Seems like it might be a good idea to tie this into the relief efforts in Puerto Rico since the island is still recovering and it is Christmas.

Starbucks did send some relief to Puerto Rico to help the farmers.

@ashleymwlopez / Twitter

Apparently, they donated 2 million coffee seeds to Puerto Rican farmers and helped sponsor the Somos benefit initiated by Jennifer Lopez and Marc Anthony. That’s truly wonderful, and it’s important to highlight when corporations give back to the communities that helped build them up.

They claim the seeds they gave were non-GMO.

@TainoAnomaly / Twitter

Starbucks donated 2 million seeds to coffee farmers throughout the island to help restart the coffee growing industry on the island. They have also partnered with World Coffee Research to enhance the quality of coffee beans produced in Puerto Rico.

Starbucks is responding to people on Twitter letting them know that they are heard and that Starbucks is committed to helping the island.

@Starbucks / Twitter

Only time will tell if the drink is something that will stay around or just a flash in the pan.

Some critics are not appeased with Starbucks donating money and coffee beans to devastated farmers.

@TainoAnomaly / Twitter

With so much happening on the island, the drink is becoming a way for people to further voice their anger with how Puerto Rico has been treated since Hurricane Maria.

Some have raised concerns over “Our Puerto Rican Flavors” being the tagline.

@MarcusShepard / Twitter

There hasn’t been any news yet as to whether or not Starbucks with donate any proceeds to Puerto Rico or nonprofits helping the island. The phrase is offending people for its cultural appropriation.

We all just have to wait and see if the drink will be good or bad for the Starbucks brand.

@Detresss / Twitter

Only time will tell.


READ: 17 Typical Christmas Foods Eaten In Latin America

Share this story with all of your friends by tapping that little share button below!

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

All The Truly Surprising Starbucks Menu Items From Around Latin America

Culture

All The Truly Surprising Starbucks Menu Items From Around Latin America

There are some things you can count on at any American Starbucks location, like the uniform flavor of Pike Place Roast, a sub-par bagel, or the baristas’ inability to spell Jennypher correctly. Outside of the U.S., however, the chain must make some menu adjustments based on local tastes.

Although the term “unusual” is certainly relative, here’s a glimpse of Starbucks’ best international offerings.

Maracuya Frappuccino – Mexico

Transport yourself to the Riviera Maya with this one. The people of Mexico can taste the exotic fruity flavor of passionfruit (aka maracuya) in their frappuccinos and save themselves from an actual trip to the beach.

Ponche Navideño – Mexico

Starbucks México on Twitter: "Recárgate de buenos deseos con una bebida de  temporada (pst, nosotros te invitamos la segunda 😁). Del 20 al 24 de  noviembre de 3 a 5 p. m.… https://t.co/hB3ziwEuDp"

Although most of us think as ponche as being just a seasonal option, several Starbucks locations in Mexico carry the traditional tasty treat all year long.

Banana Split Frappuccino – Mexico

You can take this one with or without coffee. It has all the banana and chocolate flavor of the beloved dessert and is topped with crushed waffle cones.

Envuelto Poblano – Mexico

Starbucks México | Envuelto poblano, el sabor de México en Starbucks -  YouTube

Lucuma Crème Frappuccino – Peru

Too bad they don’t serve it in the United States but I can understand why. This frappuccino is made with Lucuma, which is a tropical fruit from Peru, so it would be problematic to export it to different parts of the world. On the other hand, it makes the drink exclusive and adds one more reason to go to Peruvian Starbucks.

The taste of the fruit can be compared to maple flavor or butterscotch and this frappuccino itself is creamy and sweet as a Peruvian treat should be.

Barrita Nuez – Chile

Meet the famous humble cookie with a Chilean spin. You can taste the Barrita Nuez in Chile and enjoy the stuffing which consists of dulce de leche, nougat and walnuts.

Brigadeiro Frappuccino – Brazil

This frappuccino was born to honor the love of dulce de leche flavored ice creams which all Brazilians share. Dulce de leche is a traditional Latin American dessert that is prepared by slowly heating sweetened milk until it changes its color and gets a flavor similar to caramel.

Mini Donuts Nutella – Brazil

18 International Starbucks Items You'll Want To Travel For

Mini fried donuts filled with Nutella. Why are there no Nutella-filled treats at an American Starbucks?!

Pão de Queijo – Brazil

Brazil is often associated with skewers of meat, but there’s certainly a lot more cuisine variation. The fluffy balls of gluten-free cheese bread known as pão de queijo is a good example. The use of sour cassava starch dates back to the 1600s, before cheese was even in the picture, but today they’re available everywhere you turn in Brazil, from beachside stands to grandmothers’ kitchens to the Starbucks pastry case.

Dulce de Leche Frappuccino – Argentina

This creamy Frappuccino flavored with dulce de leche is pretty much what dreams are made of.

Cafe Tinto – Colombia

Starbucks coffee couldn’t be further than the working-class style of Colombian coffee called tinto, but as part of an effort to blend into its surroundings, the chain sells short cups of the stuff. It’s served black, and has a slightly thicker consistency than your average joe.

Churro Frappuccino – Latin America

Churro Frappuccino served at Starbucks all over Latin America includes cinnamon sprinkling, whipped cream, white mocha syrup, and a churro. 

What’s your favorite Starbucks items from across Latin America?

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Starbucks Karen Is Now Suing GoFundMe Creator For Invasion Of Privacy

Things That Matter

Starbucks Karen Is Now Suing GoFundMe Creator For Invasion Of Privacy

The pandemic was a litmus test that so many people failed. We were getting used to seeing Karens on out social media pages and the pandemic brought about so many more than we were ready to deal with. One of the most famous Amber Lynn Gilles from San Diego and she is at it again.

Amber Lynn Gilles is still upset that her video shaming a Starbucks employee backfired big time.

Last year, Gilles went to a Starbucks to order a coffee. Yet, because she was not wearing a mask, the barista, Lenin Gutierrez, refused to serve her. The employee refused to serve Gilles because she wasn’t wearing a mask, which was required because of the ongoing pandemic.

Instead of backing down, a friend of Gutierrez’s made a GoFundMe to raise money for the man who stood up to an anti-mask Karen. The GoFundMe quickly raised more than $100,000 for Gutierrez and Gilles felt entitled to some. She even threatened to sue because she was the real victim.

Gilles is claiming that she was the victim in a new lawsuit against the creator of the viral GoFundMe page.

Gilles claims that the GoFundMe was a “violation of her right to publicity,” “misappropriation of her name and likeness” and “false light invasion of privacy.” She also claims that Matt Cowan made money off of the GoFundMe page.

Cowan disputes that claim.

“All the money that was raised went to Lenin. I didn’t profit off of that at all,” Cowan told The Hill.

In a new GoFundMe page, Cowan calls out the lawsuit. In less than a week, Cowan’s GoFundMe page has raised $31,519 of the $50,000 goal.

Gilles has been successful in one thing, keeping attention on her inability to follow safety guidelines.

The latest lawsuit has caught the internet’s attention. People are donating in mass to help Cowan while Gilles original GoFundMe page is still active. So far, Gilles’ page, which has been live for months, has raised $5,750 of the $15,000 goal.

Gilles updated her GoFundMe to include a copy of the lawsuit and needs help to redress what she claims to be defamation of character. Cowan is surprised that Gilles was able to find an attorney to take the case that was filed against him and his company.

This is a developing story. We will update as the story develops.

READ: San Diego Karen Wants To Sue For Half Of Starbucks Barista’s $100K GoFundMe

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com