food & drink

These South American Foods Are Getting A Revamped Kick Thanks To Some Clever Fusions

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South American food has become synonymous with dishes such as lomo saltado, arepas, asado and churrasco. These chefs are thinking outside of the skillet and mixing in new flavors and presentations when it comes to these South American staple dishes. Welcome to the new South American fusion food.

1. Peruvian/Chinese – Madam Tusan

While those familiar with Peruvian food have probably seen elements of Chifa in the cooking (Cantonese cooking elements mixed with Peruvian traditional cooking, like arroz chaufa), Madam Tusan in Lima takes it to another level. The fortune cookies are in Spanish and the feels get fancy upgrades, like green arroz chaufa with duck.

2. Peruvian/Japanese – Chotto Matte

London’s Chotto Matte restaurant in the city’s SoHo district is plating Japanese food with touches of Peru. Chicha morada is brewed for holiday cocktails with special spices to celebrate the UK’s Bank Holiday. Wasabi gets put on the bench by this restaurant—instead, marinated chicken gets dressed with yellow chili salsa to get the spice meter up.

3.  Colombian/Italian – OCIO Coral Gables

This Miami restaurant is drawing inspiration from Italian and Colombian platters. You can order up an “arepa ociosa” with melted cheese and chopped pork rinds while another guest at the table chooses pollo rockefeller. Gives new meaning to ‘the best of both worlds.’

4. Venezuelan/Multiple Cuisines – Doggi’s Arepa Bar

Colombians and Venezuelans playfully spar on who has the best arepas, but there is no denying that Venezuelan cuisine might take the maize cake when it comes to modernizing its national dish. Doggi’s multiple Miami locations feature piping hot arepas filled with the creativity of its chefs. On the menu, you can find arepas including ‘arepa mexicana’ with pico de gallo and churrasco, ‘arepa Santa Barbara’ piled high with cheese, avocado slices and marinated steak, and ‘arepa tripleta’ stuffed with shredded gouda cheese, reina pepiada sauce and your choice of protein.

5. Peruvian/Japanese – Suviche

If we could dip any type of carb in huancaina sauce, we would tell you to hand over loaves of bolillos, baguettes, all of the carbs. What Suviche is doing at its various posts across South Florida neighborhoods is playfully mixing Peruvian staples with Japanese cuisine—with lots of the yellow spicy sauce. One of the restaurant’s signature dishes is lomo saltado stuffed into wonton bits that you can dunk again and again in huancaina sauce.

6. Japanese/Brazilian/Peruvian – SushiSamba

We did not think you could fuse this trifecta of cuisine traditions—but here we are and we are feeling blessed by it. 🙏

SushiSamba has outposts in Las Vegas, Miami, London and Amsterdam “celebrating the culture and cuisine” of these three countries, according to the restaurant’s Instagram account. Guests in London can try robata octopus with aji panca, while in Amsterdam, one menu item is the short rib croquetts made with Peruvian purple potato. *Checks cheapest flights to Europe.*

7. Chilean/German – Fuente Alemana Alameda

Santiago’s Fuente Alemana Alameda restaurant showcases Chile’s take on burgers. The sandwiches are stacked high with juicy cuts of meat and melted cheese. Wash it all down with a schop (draft beer) and eat like a true local.

8. Ecuadorian/Multiple Cuisines – Fried Bananas Restaurant

First Ecuadorian meal! #quito

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Located in Ecuador’s capital city of Quito, Fried Bananas gives a quaint take on Ecuadorian food. Guests can munch on popcorn baskets while waiting for their main entrees to come out, ranging from Ecuadorian spaghetti, mozzarella with honey dish, to tofu ceviche and more.

9. Uruguayan/Armenian – Erevan

The national dish of Uruguay is the chivito, thin slices of beef steak with mayo, tomato, olives, mozzarella and egg, fries and other garnishes in between two slices of bread. Montevideo’s Erevan restaurant adds an Armenian touch to the dish, adding its pita bread as the slices that hold it all together.


READ: Here Are 11 Vegan Versions Of Staple Latino Foods That Will Make You Consider Going Vegan

What are some of your favorite South American fusion dishes? Share this with your friends and tell us in the comments below!

Environmentalists Are Outraged At The US’s Latest Plans To Use The Galapagos Island As An Airstrip

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Environmentalists Are Outraged At The US’s Latest Plans To Use The Galapagos Island As An Airstrip

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Ecuador is receiving heavy criticism for giving the U.S. military permission to use a Galapagos island as an airfield. The proposed plan by Ecuador to allow the U.S. to use an airstrip on the Galapagos island of San Cristobal has drawn anger from local politicians and activists that say more harm than good will be done. The historic islands in Ecuador are one of the most biodiverse regions on the globe and are home to a number of species found nowhere else on the planet.

Ecuador and the U.S. plan on using the island as a way to stop drug trafficking flights.

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Under the deal with Ecuador, the Pentagon will use the tiny airport on the San Cristobal island to “fight drug trafficking”, defense minister Oswaldo Jarrin told Latin American TV network Telesur.

Jarrín announced Ecuador President Lenín Moreno’s administration’s decision to expand an existing airfield on the San Cristobal Island for U.S. spy planes targeting drug traffickers on June 12. The aircrafts that would be used include a Boeing 777 and a Lockheed P-3 Orion.

According to the Los Angeles Times, multiple Latin American nations like Colombia, Peru, and Panama don’t allow the basing of U.S. anti-drug overflights controlled by the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA).

Ecuador’s constitution, which was adopted in 2008, prohibits the installation of foreign military bases in the country.

Former Ecuadorian president Rafael Correa tweeted “Galápagos is NOT an ‘aircraft carrier’ for gringo use. It is an Ecuadorian province, world heritage site, homeland.”

Following mass criticism, Jarrin said that the Galapagos Islands would not become home to a U.S. military base or any kind of permanent post. “A base means permanence, there will be no permanence,” Jarrín said.

He added that flight crews would stay a week at most on the island and activities would be monitored by Ecuadorian authorities. The Pentagon would also have to pay for any needed “readjustments” to the airfield, which some fear could lead to environmental harm.

Critics of the proposed plan say the move could threaten the fragile environment of the island.

The Galapagos Islands are one of the world’s most famous areas known for its unique array of wildlife and natural plants. Famed for its rich biodiversity, which inspired Charles Darwin’s theory of evolution, it was named a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1978.

Many fear that construction or possible use of the island for military purposes will harm wildlife and other organisms there. The increasing number of tourists have already caused some concerns. The number of tourists visiting the islands rose from 161,000 in 2007 to over 225,000 in 2016, the International Galapagos Tour Operators Association said.

At this time, it’s unclear if Ecuador will proceed with its plans with the U.S. as many have criticized the proposed plans. The Pentagon has yet to comment or confirm any such agreement with Ecuador.

READ: New Research Shows Most Undocumented Immigrants Aren’t Coming From Mexico But Instead Central America

People Are Furious That The Peruvian Government Is Risking Machu Picchu By Building An Airport Near The Site

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People Are Furious That The Peruvian Government Is Risking Machu Picchu By Building An Airport Near The Site

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There’s a reason why historical grounds are considered sacred. Ancient areas in the world are part of our history. They are a glimpse of what life was like thousands of years before. For avid travelers that seek to visit these historical areas, they understand the value and privilege of what it’s like to be there. As such, we try to protect it for future generations to come. That’s what makes what is happening near Machu Picchu so frustrating for the international community.

Peru is constructing the Chinchero International Airport near the Andes mountains, which is packed with Incan relics.

The government broke ground on the ancient grounds earlier this year. According to KUNC, the airport will be built in the “mouth of the Sacred Valley” and will be a multi-billion-dollar project.

The airport is expected to transport more than 7 million people a year, but some are wondering how the traffic and pollution will affect these parts that are valuable to history.

“The airport planned to be built in Chinchero, Cusco, endangers the conservation of one of the most important historical and archaeological sites in the world,” a petition on Change.org states. “An airport in the surroundings of the Sacred Valley will affect the integrity of a complex Inca landscape and will cause irreparable damage due to noise, traffic, and uncontrolled urbanization.”

Peruvian officials claim there are no Incan artifacts located in the construction area.

The main problem is Machu Picchu is already getting more tourists than it should. The Guardian reports that “more than 1.5 million visitors in 2017, almost double the limit recommended by UNESCO, putting a huge strain on the fragile ruins and local ecology.”

We recently saw the devastating effects from Mt. Everest, which shows what happens when people go to a tourist area thinking anyone can handle it. More people are dying as they climb Mt. Everest and they’re also leaving massive amounts of trash behind.

If the government wants to make travel easier to Machu Picchu why couldn’t they think of a better alternative instead of damaging their main money-making tourist spot?

The government reiterates that the reason it has taken so long to get this airport approved is that they have conducted several studies to make sure the area is not hurt by the construction.

“It is a project of many years, for which all the studies have been carried out, it will solve the problem that now exists with the Velasco Astete Airport and projects an important growth of the tourist activity of Cusco, ” Guillermo Cortés, Vice Minister of Cultural Heritage and Cultural Industries of the Ministry of Culture, told a Spanish news outlet in Peru. He added, “that the Chinchero Airport is also a project that is developed in an area for which all the precautions and precautions have been taken so as not to affect the heritage.”

Click here for more information on what is happening and how you can get involved.

READ: Peru’s Former President Alan Garcia Commits Suicide As Police Attempt Arrest In Corruption Charges

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