food & drink

Here Are The National Dishes That Belong To These Latin American Countries

National treasures can come in the form of poets, art, literature and even in food. Here are some common dishes you can find when sitting down at a traditional restaurant from these Latin American countries.

1. Chivito – Uruguay

RECETA N°11: El mejor sandwich de Uruguay 🇺🇾… Un chivito!! 😍😍🤤🤤. Quién lo ha probado? Es el más clásico de allá, y es IMPOSIBLE que te quede mal. Es que cuando mezclas churrasco, jamón acaramelado, queso mozzarella y gauda derretidos, lechuga, tomate, tocino ahumado crocante, pimentones caramelizados, mayonesa y huevo duro, tienes el 90% de la pega hecha jaja. MEDIA MEZCLA! Es casi puro montar, pero les doy algunos tips en el paso a paso. Primero, hagan el tocino (sin aceite, solo con su propia grasa). Cuando esté crocante, lo reservan en un plato con toalla nova, y en la misma plancha o sartén tiran los churrascos. Así se mezclan con los juguitos del tocino y quedan más ricos. Por mientras, echan los pimentones y si quieren les agregan un poco de azúcar. Envuelvan una lámina de cada queso en una de jamón, y también lo tiran a la plancha. Recuerden condimentar tanto el tomate como el huevo duro (también funciona increíble con huevo frito, ojo 👀), y luego solo quedar montar todo!! Clave la mayo en ambas partes del pan (y tostadito, please). Una bomba de sabor, rápido y rico. #365Sanguchez #365Recetas #sandwich #chivito #Uruguay #chivitocanadiense #chivitouruguayo #Beef #churrasco #tocino

A post shared by Felipe Sanchez (@365sanguchez) on

Cooked beef steak (churrasco), mayo, tomatoes, mozzarella slices, olives, bacon, hard-boiled eggs and ham are assembled in between two bread slices for a chivito—Uruguay’s national dish. If you head to Uruguay to try this dish in person, expect your platter to include Russian potato salad or French fries.

Need more proof this is the national dish? In the city of Maldonado in Uruguay, a celebration is held yearly for a chivito party, complete with games, dancing, pony rides and music. CUTE! ☺️ 

2. Sopa paraguaya – Paraguay

Sometimes you can’t take things literally, like this national dish from Paraguay. Sopa de paraguaya is not soup in the conventional sense. Similar to cornbread, the dish is often baked in the juices of a roasted chicken and made with cornmeal, eggs, chopped onions, cheese, cottage cheese, milk and lard.

3. Sancocho – Panama

Noted as the national dish of Panama, sancocho can also be seen on the menus of countries including Honduras, Ecuador, Colombia, Dominican Republic and Venezuela. In Panama, the dish is called sancocho de gallina, and is made with chicken, the herb cilantro, mazorca, yuca, otoe, chopped onions, garlic and oregano. If you are suffering from a major hangover, sancocho is said to do the trick for getting you back into shape. 😎 

4. Pabellón criollo – Venezuela

Arepas might be the Venezuelan dish that is most widely known, but the national dish is actually pabellón criollo. White rice, black beans and shredded beef is placed on a plate and sprinkled with some queso palmita on top of the beans. If you want to get *que fancy* with it, ask for a pabellón a caballo, which means adding a fried egg on top.

5. Pupusa – El Salvador

Pupusa sunday!! #pupusa #brunch #homemade

A post shared by danielle nelson (@danie_dandelion) on

It doesn’t matter if you are eating them with a fork or with your hands (a common debate), pupusas are DELISH. The thick corn patties are stuffed with cheese and your choice of ingredients ranging from refried beans, chicharrones, and the loroco flower. Slather your pupusa with tomato salsa and curtido, a mixture of pickled cabbage and carrots. Started in 2005, there is even a National Pupusa Day in El Salvador. A holiday you can always be sure to put on your calendar.

6. Gallo pinto – Costa Rica and Nicaragua

Beans and rice. The yin and yang of many Latin American dishes. In Costa Rica and Nicaragua, the combination of this typical dish is called gallo pinto (spotted rooster) and is made with red or black beans, and arroz. The flavor comes from adding in chicken broth and chopped onion, sweet pepper and cilantro.

7. Pastel de choclo – Chile

Pastel de choclo is eaten in Chile, Argentina, Peru and Bolivia and uses ground up sweetcorn to make a paste. The paste is mixed in with some basil for a little kick and layered on top of a filling. Pino is used as the filling, which is onion, paprika and other spices cooked with minced beef.

8. Asados – Argentina

Grilling meat is one of the favorite pastimes for Argentines. It’s an opportunity for a communal gathering to talk about the past week, soccer and just have an all around good time. The meat (usually beef and sausage) is grilled on a parrilla and usually takes about two hours to prepare.  

9. Feijoada – Brazil

#feijoada 😋

A post shared by Laura Moura Lima (@lauramoulima) on

The Brazilian version of feijoada is often served with pork trimmings (ears, feet and tail), bacon, sausage, jerked beef, black beans and some rice. Depending on the region in Brazil you are eating this dish in, additional items are included, such as kale, bananas, celery and pumpkin.

10. Salteñas – Bolivia

Say it with us—savory foods are the holy grail of food. These baked type of empanadas are a little bit of sweet and spicy, often filled with a type of meat, raisins, olives, and potatoes. Fun facts: this empanada is named after the Argentine city of Salta and are baked upright instead of lying on their side.

11. La bandera – Dominican Republic

Papá (mi abuelo paterno) muy Cibaeño Dominicano decía: "Que comer comida calentá' daba cuaja" Básicamente decía que comer recalentado causaba pereza 🤣 Pero que Sabiondo Papá para que le hicieran su comida todos los días. Con este estilo de vida tan agitado, estos horarios de trabajo tan locos y esa comida que queda del día anterior y quien se resiste a no comérsela?! Felicito a todas (os) que pueden cocinar las 3 calientes todos los días… Yo mientras me voy a cenar este Calentao' Díganme a ver que opinan 🙄 . . . . . #cocinandoencasadeliz #cenandoencasadeliz #arrozconhabichuelas #ycarne #arrozconhabichuela #habichuelasguisadas #habichuelasrojasguisadas #labanderadominicana #albondigasguisadas #fritosmaduros #ensaladaverde #comidadominicana #dominicancooking #cocinadominicana #comidahechaencasa #rutagourmetdo #afuegoalto #dominicanfood #gastronomiadominicana #comidacalenta #recalentado #leftoverfood

A post shared by 🇩🇴Liz FernándezR🇩🇴 (@cocinandoencasadeliz) on

Literally translated as “the flag,” this Dominican dish often features stewed meat, rice and beans to represent the tricolored flag. The dish is also called “plato del día” or “el almuerzo” and is commonly eaten for lunch with a side of tostones, avocado and a side salad. SIGN US UP for this meal!

Are there any dishes on the list that you want to try? If so, share this article with your friends!


READ: In Case You Weren’t Already Aware, These Latino ‘Junk Food’ Snacks Are Totally Vegan

He’s Been Called The Greatest Latino Boxer Of All Time And Panamanian Boxer Roberto Duran Might Just Prove His Case In This Documentary

Entertainment

He’s Been Called The Greatest Latino Boxer Of All Time And Panamanian Boxer Roberto Duran Might Just Prove His Case In This Documentary

robertoduranbox / Instagram

No one can deny the impact Latinos have had in the sport of boxing. The rough upbringing of many young men from the region has led trainers and managers to generate a vast quantity of world champions. Names like Julio Cesar Chávez, Ricardo López Nava, Felix Tito Trinidad, Alexis Arguello, and Carlos Monzón bring tears of joy to fans from countries as diverse as Mexico, Puerto Rico, Argentina, and Nicaragua. Boxing champions encapsulate the dreams and aspirations of young Latinos. Because it is often the case that in our continent governments fail the population and each person has to fend for themselves, boxing has become a metaphor for individual progress amidst the most adverse circumstances. 

Roberto Durán is one of the most iconic boxers from Latin America to embody the fighting spirit of Panama.

Credit: Instagram. @robertoduranbox

Panamanian legend Roberto “Manos de Piedra” Durán broke into the Latin American and U.S. mainstream pop culture due to his volatile personality and the brutal precision of his fighting style. Now retired, Durán is again in the spotlight due to the release of the documentary “I Am Durán,” directed by Mat Hodgson and which features other personalities such as Oscar De La Hoya and Robert De Niro, a big fan of his.

So before you watch the documentary, here are some facts about the proud son of Panama. Keep your guard up!

He was born on June 16, 1951.

Credit: robertoduranbox / Instagram

He was born in Guararé, where his mother Clara Samaniego was from. His father was from Arizona in the United States and was of Mexican descent. 

He was abandoned by his dad when he was only 5-years-old.

Credit: robertoduranbox / Instagram

As a way of survival, his family could not keep him in school but rather had to send him to work in the streets as a shoeshine boy. Just like the Filipino great Manny Pacquiao, Durán learned the ropes of life in the streets. That made him hungry for success, a hunger he translated into surgically performed combinations in the boxing ring. 

He laced up the gloves when he was 8-years-old. 

Credit: robertoduranbox / Instagram

His fighting spirit was there from the beginning. He grew up in the slums of El Chorrillo, so he had to learn how to defend himself in the rough streets. He visited the gym Neco de La Guardia as a kid and the rest is history: before they knew it, he was up there in the ring sparring experienced boxers. What a chico maravilla

He began his pro career with 31 straight wins.

Credit: robertoduranbox / Instagram

Durán got a reputation of being a killer in the ring due to his hard punches, solid body frame and general toughness. He won the lightweight championship against Ken Buchanan in 1972 but lost for the first time that same year against Esteban de Jesus. The fight in Madison Square Garden was his Waterloo. Two years later he rematched De Jesus and knocked him out. It is important to note that the De Jesus fight was his sixth in 1972, so he was worn out. 

He was the first Latin American boxer to rule in four weight classes.

Credit: robertoduranbox / Instagram

Others would follow (the Mexican greats JC Chávez, Juan Manuel Márquez, and Travieso Arce), but Roberto was the first bad hombre from Latin America to rule in four weight classes. And he did so in a day and age when a world championship was hard to get (in today’s corrupt boxing world there are up to four champions per each one of the 17 weight classes, so being a champ is relatively easier). He also fought many fights scheduled for 15 rounds instead of the current 12. Even though his best years were at lightweight, he rules the following classes:  lightweight, welterweight, light middleweight, and middleweight. 

He made 12 defenses of the lightweight title.

Credit: robertoduranbox / Instagram

Roberto was practically indestructible for a period of time. He won eleven title defenses by KO and reached a record of 62-1. He gave up the lightweight title in 1979. He basically dominated world boxing in the 1970s with those hands of stone that sent opponents to sleep, one after an another. 

His biggest night: beating Sugar Ray Leonard in 1980 for the welterweight title.

Credit: robertoduranbox / Instagram

After vacating the lightweight title “Manos de Piedra” moved to welterweight. He defeated Carlos Palomino and Zeferino Gonzales, two tough opponents. Once comfortable in the new weight, he faced the golden boy of US boxing, Sugar Ray Leonard, in a fateful June 20 night in Montreal, Canada. Roberto’s relentless pressure broke down Sugar Ray. Thunder defeated lighting and Durán won by a unanimous decision. 

But then came the infamous “No Más.”

Credit: robertoduranbox / Instagram

After defeating Leonard “Manos de Piedra” became even more legendary. He went back to Panama and partied like there was no tomorrow. The rematch was fought in November. Leonard trained like a champ, while Roberto had to cut weight extremely fast and just wasn’t in the right frame of mind. Leonard was magnificent: he played with Roberto, mocked him, slipped the Panamanian’s punches and basically humiliated him. In the eighth round, Roberto turned his back to Leonard and said: “No sigo” (this were his actual words, although the infamous “No Mas” is how the event was remembered. 

He rebuilt his career.

Credit: robertoduranbox / Instagram

It would be hard for any sports figure to come back after such a meaningful defeat. It is not the same being knocked out after a valiant effort as quitting. It was such a disappointment not only for the fighter but also for his millions of fans. So what did the great fighter do? What all elite pugilists do: he came back with a vengeance. He defeated Wilfred Benitez and Davey Moore, two of the best fighters in the world.

He is one of the 1980s Magnificent Four.

Credit: robertoduranbox / Instagram

Boxing in the 1980s was defined by four greats: Roberto, Sugar Ray Leonard, Tommy Hearns, and Marvin Hagler. These four all fought each other and gave fans thrills. Roberto lost to Hearns by KO and to Hagler by a tough decision, but his name will always be attached to one of boxing’s golden eras. 

He fought until 2000.

Credit: robertoduranbox / Instagram

It is unusual for a fighter in this day an age to compete across four decades, but Durán did it. His professional debut was on February 23, 1968, and his last fight was a loss to Puerto Rican extraordinaire Hector Macho Camacho on July 14, 2000. At the end of his career, his record read 103 wins, 16 losses, and a whopping 70 KOs. Wow, just wow.

The debate continues: is he the greatest Latino fighter ever?

Credit: robertoduranbox / Instagram

That is hard to tell. The main contenders for this mythic title are here in this photograph with him: Mexicans Julio Cesar Chávez and Juan Manuel Márquez, who also faced myriad of champions and former champions over their storied careers. One thing is for certain, Roberto wrote his name on the annals of boxing history in golden letters. And he will never be forgotten.

READ: Andy Ruiz Jr. Might Be A New Boxing Champion But He Doesn’t Start Any Fight Without His Snickers

A Venezuelan Man Is Instagramming His 1,118 Mile Walk To Educate Everyone On What Is Really Happening In Venezuela

Things That Matter

A Venezuelan Man Is Instagramming His 1,118 Mile Walk To Educate Everyone On What Is Really Happening In Venezuela

laordendemiranda / Instagram

Living in Trump’s America, there’s no shortage of causes that people should know about. Whether you’re fighting for immigration rights, women’s rights, voting rights, healthcare for all, or the environment, there’s truly a cause for everyone. The problem is if you care about all of these things, you will undoubtedly get burned out, which is why it’s essential to stick with one thing and put your heart into it. That’s what we’re learning from Miguel Galindo, a man walking from Doral, Florida to Washington to bring attention to the crisis in Venezuela.

Thirty-four-year-old Miguel Galindo is walking 1,100 miles from Florida to Washington to bring attention to the crisis in Venezuela.

Instagram/@laordendemiranda

Some may think there’s no way Galindo’s walk will bring any kind of change to the country, which is currently under tremendous turmoil within its government and the people.

“I am clear that by hiking from here to Washington, I am not going to remove Nicolás Maduro from power,” Galindo said to NBC News. “What I am trying to do is to add to the fight, add other Latino brothers and sisters, add other American brothers and sisters.”

He’s documenting the entire journey on his Instagram.

Instagram/@laordendemiranda

He launched his project walk earlier this month and is keeping all of his followers (more than 270K) up to date on what’s going on. He posts videos regularly showing the people helping him along his journey and showing his progress as he walks along with the route crossing six states.

He has reached out to help him on his walk to Washington.

“I can count on my Venezuelan brothers and sisters who have already offered me their homes, they have offered to pay for hotel stays, and I have also planned to sleep on the beach,” he tells NBC News.

Here’s what he’s taking on his trip — it’s not a lot either.

Instagram/@laordendemiranda
  • a large backpack
  • shirts
  • pants
  • socks
  • cell phones
  • chargers

The rest, he said, people will mail him to various spots on his route.
What’s really great about this story is that a person who wants to do something for his home country but cannot because he is not there shows that you still can help regardless of how far away you are.

Galindo is walking from Doral, Florida to Washington to honor the Venezuelan refugees who have had no choice but to walk out of their country for safety.

The crisis in Venezuela has been devastating the country and the people for years. As time passes, things in the country continue to deteriorate and people are forced to flee their homeland on foot for safety and freedom. Millions of Venezuelans have been left with no choice but to leave their homes and families behind to escape the collapsing country.

The young man wants to educate people about what is happening in Venezuela and the cause of the strife in the country.

According to his first video, Galindo wants people to know that President Trump is not the cause of the situation in Venezuela. He is also taking a stand against Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro and placing the blame for the crisis in his hands. He has also used his platform to let everyone who is listening know that Venezuelan Interim-President Juan Guiadó is simply fighting against the Maduro regime to restore democracy in Venezuela.

His friends have taken to social media to continue to express why the walk is happening.

First and foremost, they state they are not doing this as part of any political party or ideology. Instead, they are doing it as proud Venezuelans trying to save their country. As far as they are concerned, they are walking to Washington to fight for Venezuela, not any political ideology.

The walk is still going and mitú will update our report as the walk continues. Buena suerte, Galindo.

READ: The Crisis In Venezuela Is Worsening. Here’s What You Should Know Right Now

Paid Promoted Stories