Culture

Here Are The National Dishes That Belong To These Latin American Countries

National treasures can come in the form of poets, art, literature and even in food. Here are some common dishes you can find when sitting down at a traditional restaurant from these Latin American countries.

1. Chivito – Uruguay

RECETA N°11: El mejor sandwich de Uruguay ????????… Un chivito!! ????????????????. Quién lo ha probado? Es el más clásico de allá, y es IMPOSIBLE que te quede mal. Es que cuando mezclas churrasco, jamón acaramelado, queso mozzarella y gauda derretidos, lechuga, tomate, tocino ahumado crocante, pimentones caramelizados, mayonesa y huevo duro, tienes el 90% de la pega hecha jaja. MEDIA MEZCLA! Es casi puro montar, pero les doy algunos tips en el paso a paso. Primero, hagan el tocino (sin aceite, solo con su propia grasa). Cuando esté crocante, lo reservan en un plato con toalla nova, y en la misma plancha o sartén tiran los churrascos. Así se mezclan con los juguitos del tocino y quedan más ricos. Por mientras, echan los pimentones y si quieren les agregan un poco de azúcar. Envuelvan una lámina de cada queso en una de jamón, y también lo tiran a la plancha. Recuerden condimentar tanto el tomate como el huevo duro (también funciona increíble con huevo frito, ojo ????), y luego solo quedar montar todo!! Clave la mayo en ambas partes del pan (y tostadito, please). Una bomba de sabor, rápido y rico. #365Sanguchez #365Recetas #sandwich #chivito #Uruguay #chivitocanadiense #chivitouruguayo #Beef #churrasco #tocino

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Cooked beef steak (churrasco), mayo, tomatoes, mozzarella slices, olives, bacon, hard-boiled eggs and ham are assembled in between two bread slices for a chivito—Uruguay’s national dish. If you head to Uruguay to try this dish in person, expect your platter to include Russian potato salad or French fries.

Need more proof this is the national dish? In the city of Maldonado in Uruguay, a celebration is held yearly for a chivito party, complete with games, dancing, pony rides and music. CUTE! ☺️ 

2. Sopa paraguaya – Paraguay

Sometimes you can’t take things literally, like this national dish from Paraguay. Sopa de paraguaya is not soup in the conventional sense. Similar to cornbread, the dish is often baked in the juices of a roasted chicken and made with cornmeal, eggs, chopped onions, cheese, cottage cheese, milk and lard.

3. Sancocho – Panama

Noted as the national dish of Panama, sancocho can also be seen on the menus of countries including Honduras, Ecuador, Colombia, Dominican Republic and Venezuela. In Panama, the dish is called sancocho de gallina, and is made with chicken, the herb cilantro, mazorca, yuca, otoe, chopped onions, garlic and oregano. If you are suffering from a major hangover, sancocho is said to do the trick for getting you back into shape. ???? 

4. Pabellón criollo – Venezuela

Arepas might be the Venezuelan dish that is most widely known, but the national dish is actually pabellón criollo. White rice, black beans and shredded beef is placed on a plate and sprinkled with some queso palmita on top of the beans. If you want to get *que fancy* with it, ask for a pabellón a caballo, which means adding a fried egg on top.

5. Pupusa – El Salvador

Pupusa sunday!! #pupusa #brunch #homemade

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It doesn’t matter if you are eating them with a fork or with your hands (a common debate), pupusas are DELISH. The thick corn patties are stuffed with cheese and your choice of ingredients ranging from refried beans, chicharrones, and the loroco flower. Slather your pupusa with tomato salsa and curtido, a mixture of pickled cabbage and carrots. Started in 2005, there is even a National Pupusa Day in El Salvador. A holiday you can always be sure to put on your calendar.

6. Gallo pinto – Costa Rica and Nicaragua

Beans and rice. The yin and yang of many Latin American dishes. In Costa Rica and Nicaragua, the combination of this typical dish is called gallo pinto (spotted rooster) and is made with red or black beans, and arroz. The flavor comes from adding in chicken broth and chopped onion, sweet pepper and cilantro.

7. Pastel de choclo – Chile

Pastel de choclo is eaten in Chile, Argentina, Peru and Bolivia and uses ground up sweetcorn to make a paste. The paste is mixed in with some basil for a little kick and layered on top of a filling. Pino is used as the filling, which is onion, paprika and other spices cooked with minced beef.

8. Asados – Argentina

Grilling meat is one of the favorite pastimes for Argentines. It’s an opportunity for a communal gathering to talk about the past week, soccer and just have an all around good time. The meat (usually beef and sausage) is grilled on a parrilla and usually takes about two hours to prepare.  

9. Feijoada – Brazil

#feijoada ????

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The Brazilian version of feijoada is often served with pork trimmings (ears, feet and tail), bacon, sausage, jerked beef, black beans and some rice. Depending on the region in Brazil you are eating this dish in, additional items are included, such as kale, bananas, celery and pumpkin.

10. Salteñas – Bolivia

Say it with us—savory foods are the holy grail of food. These baked type of empanadas are a little bit of sweet and spicy, often filled with a type of meat, raisins, olives, and potatoes. Fun facts: this empanada is named after the Argentine city of Salta and are baked upright instead of lying on their side.

11. La bandera – Dominican Republic

Papá (mi abuelo paterno) muy Cibaeño Dominicano decía: "Que comer comida calentá' daba cuaja" Básicamente decía que comer recalentado causaba pereza ???? Pero que Sabiondo Papá para que le hicieran su comida todos los días. Con este estilo de vida tan agitado, estos horarios de trabajo tan locos y esa comida que queda del día anterior y quien se resiste a no comérsela?! Felicito a todas (os) que pueden cocinar las 3 calientes todos los días… Yo mientras me voy a cenar este Calentao' Díganme a ver que opinan ???? . . . . . #cocinandoencasadeliz #cenandoencasadeliz #arrozconhabichuelas #ycarne #arrozconhabichuela #habichuelasguisadas #habichuelasrojasguisadas #labanderadominicana #albondigasguisadas #fritosmaduros #ensaladaverde #comidadominicana #dominicancooking #cocinadominicana #comidahechaencasa #rutagourmetdo #afuegoalto #dominicanfood #gastronomiadominicana #comidacalenta #recalentado #leftoverfood

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Literally translated as “the flag,” this Dominican dish often features stewed meat, rice and beans to represent the tricolored flag. The dish is also called “plato del día” or “el almuerzo” and is commonly eaten for lunch with a side of tostones, avocado and a side salad. SIGN US UP for this meal!

Are there any dishes on the list that you want to try? If so, share this article with your friends!


READ: In Case You Weren’t Already Aware, These Latino ‘Junk Food’ Snacks Are Totally Vegan

The US, Colombia Deny Any Involvement In What Venezuela’s Nicolás Maduro Calls Failed Invasion

Things That Matter

The US, Colombia Deny Any Involvement In What Venezuela’s Nicolás Maduro Calls Failed Invasion

nicolasmaduro / Instagram

Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro accused both the U.S. and Colombian governments of trying to stage an invasion. President Maduro accused made the accusations towards the beginning of May when two Americans were arrested with a group of other people.

Both the U.S. and Colombia have denied any report of an attempted coup on Venezuela.

On May 3, a group of Venezuelan rebels and two Americans allegedly began a coup attempt in Venezuela. They began on the northern tip of the country and reportedly had plans to take control of Maracaibo and Caracas. They were all immediately captured and 8 Venezuelans in the group were killed during the conflict.

According to the Daily Mail, Jordan Goudreau, 43, was involved with the coup and told a close friend about it. It is alleged that Goudreau bragged about having a contract with the U.S. government to protect oil interests in Venezuela.

The mercenaries behind the attempted coup claim to have done security for a President Trump rally in 2018.

Goudreau, who has been described as the mastermind of the coup attempt, owns the security company Silvercorp. An old Instagram post shows the Florida-based company running security for a Trump rally back in 2018. The company has since deleted the Instagram posts after news broke about their failed attempt to train Venezuelan rebels and capture the South American country.

“He came out to Colorado,” Drew White, Goudreau’s former business partner told Daily Mail. “He said he had a deal from the State Department to protect oil interests in Venezuela. He was saying it was handed to him directly. He was saying it was directed and passed down by the State Department, that it was a legitimate operation and they also had some private funding backing, which isn’t unusual with these kinds of things. Essentially he was like, ‘We’re going to topple Maduro.’ At that point I was like, ‘This doesn’t seem legitimate” and we broke ways.”

Goudreau claims that the Trump administration and Venezuelan resistance leader Juan Guaidó green-lit the operation.

The U.S. and Venezuela have had a contentious relationship over the past few years. The political unrest in Venezuela has continued to draw criticism from the international community as Venezuelans have protested for a new leader. When the relationship with Trump soured, Maduro began to claim that the U.S. was attempting to overthrow the government.

Both the U.S. and Colombian governments have denied any involvement in the alleged coup.

Reports state that the group of men attempting to topple the Venezuelan government did nothing to hide their plan. The security group was tweeting their plans to the open-world alerting anyone with a Twitter account to their plans. SilverCorp USA has since deleted their Twitter account. Experts and officials have decisively denied any collaboration between the mercenaries and the two governments.

“There is no way that I can see any kind of U.S. involvement,” Fernando Cutz, who served as a Latin America adviser on the National Security Council under both Obama and Trump, told the Huffington Post. “There were no logistics, the numbers were a joke, they clearly didn’t have any intel. A group of high schoolers would have done a better job.”

Social media has spent time dragging the security company over its failed coup attempt.

There is still a lot of speculation swirling around the “coup.” However, Goudreau’s friend is pretty sure that the missions was not as official as Goudreau claims.

“He’s a good man,” White told Daily Mail. “He was the best man at my wedding. We have a lot of history together and it never seemed like he was lying like that. But once you started looking at it, none of it really added up. He kept asking to meet with people for funding. But typically with a State Department contract, the funding is shored up. You might have some private entities helping here and there. But it was pretty obvious that it was not a state-sanctioned activity.”

READ: Venezuela’s President Maduro And Opposition Leader Guaidó Are Allegedly In Secret Talks And The World Wants To Know The Details

Venezuela’s President Maduro And Opposition Leader Guaidó Are Allegedly In Secret Talks And The World Wants To Know The Details

Things That Matter

Venezuela’s President Maduro And Opposition Leader Guaidó Are Allegedly In Secret Talks And The World Wants To Know The Details

Vítor Garetol / Getty

Despite a global pandemic – or maybe because of it – Venezuela’s two governments are holding high-level talks, according to several sources – as reported by Reuters.

The breaking development comes as the U.S. ratchets up pressure on the Venezuela and a growing number of countries now recognize the opposition leader, Juan Guaidó, as the legitimate leader of Venezuela.

The two sides are discussing everything from the Coronavirus pandemic to fuel shortages and hyperinflation.

Credit: Venezuelan Presidency / Getty

According to a report by Reuters, the two sides have come together to discuss a variety of issues despite a growing bitterness between the two leaders.

Obviously, Venezuela faces ongoing crises but the global health pandemic has heightened fears within the country of all out chaos. The country is barely equipped to handle normal, everyday health emergencies let alone a global pandemic.

The U.S. and its international allies have also tightened the already unprecented sanctions on the country and has issued an arrest warrant for Maduro. Many within the government, according to sources, say this has motivated them to seek political survival under a possible change of government.

Other than the Coronavirus and ongoing domestic economic issues, the talks are said to have no clear agenda.

Credit: Felipe Escobedo / Getty

It’s not entirely certain what either side is hoping to achieve with these talks. “There are two extremes: Maduro and those who believe that the virus will end Guaido’s leadership, and those on the other side (who) hope this crisis will bring down Maduro,” said an opposition legislator in favor of the discussions.

Maduro and Guaidó are competing with one another to help combat the effects of the pandemic, with each side convinced the outbreak will undermine the other politically. But it remains to be seen which side will come out ahead given the vacuum of leadership and the growing crisis everyday Venezuelans face.

Activists and rights groups around the world have urged the two factions to seek a truce in order to coordinate the delivery of aid and boost gasoline imports.

Meanwhile, the United States has put ‘maximum pressure’ on the Maduro regime to try and force a change of government.

The US state department in March offered to begin lifting parts of the sanctions if members of the Socialist party formed an interim government without Maduro, a plan backed by Guaidó but quickly shot down by the government.

The U.S. has also issued an international arrest warrant for Maduro – accusing him of drug trafficking and money laundering. This allegedly has members of his government looking for an exit strategy.

Venezuela has so far escaped the worst effects of the Coronavirus.

Venezuela is particularly vulnerable to the wider effects of the pandemic because of its ongoing socioeconomic and political crisis causing massive shortages of food staples and basic necessities, including medical supplies. The mass emigration of Venezuelan doctors has also caused chronic staff shortages in hospitals.

So far, the country has seen just 311 confirmed cases and 10 deaths related to the virus – but these numbers are suspected to be unreliable because of a lack of testing in the country.

Maduro has reacted to the pandemic by reversing his opposition to the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and asking for $5 billion in international aid to help his government combat the virus. The county has also suspended all international flights and borders between Venezuela and Colombia and Brazil have been closed since mid-March.