Culture

Here Are The National Dishes That Belong To These Latin American Countries

National treasures can come in the form of poets, art, literature and even in food. Here are some common dishes you can find when sitting down at a traditional restaurant from these Latin American countries.

1. Chivito – Uruguay

RECETA N°11: El mejor sandwich de Uruguay 🇺🇾… Un chivito!! 😍😍🤤🤤. Quién lo ha probado? Es el más clásico de allá, y es IMPOSIBLE que te quede mal. Es que cuando mezclas churrasco, jamón acaramelado, queso mozzarella y gauda derretidos, lechuga, tomate, tocino ahumado crocante, pimentones caramelizados, mayonesa y huevo duro, tienes el 90% de la pega hecha jaja. MEDIA MEZCLA! Es casi puro montar, pero les doy algunos tips en el paso a paso. Primero, hagan el tocino (sin aceite, solo con su propia grasa). Cuando esté crocante, lo reservan en un plato con toalla nova, y en la misma plancha o sartén tiran los churrascos. Así se mezclan con los juguitos del tocino y quedan más ricos. Por mientras, echan los pimentones y si quieren les agregan un poco de azúcar. Envuelvan una lámina de cada queso en una de jamón, y también lo tiran a la plancha. Recuerden condimentar tanto el tomate como el huevo duro (también funciona increíble con huevo frito, ojo 👀), y luego solo quedar montar todo!! Clave la mayo en ambas partes del pan (y tostadito, please). Una bomba de sabor, rápido y rico. #365Sanguchez #365Recetas #sandwich #chivito #Uruguay #chivitocanadiense #chivitouruguayo #Beef #churrasco #tocino

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Cooked beef steak (churrasco), mayo, tomatoes, mozzarella slices, olives, bacon, hard-boiled eggs and ham are assembled in between two bread slices for a chivito—Uruguay’s national dish. If you head to Uruguay to try this dish in person, expect your platter to include Russian potato salad or French fries.

Need more proof this is the national dish? In the city of Maldonado in Uruguay, a celebration is held yearly for a chivito party, complete with games, dancing, pony rides and music. CUTE! ☺️ 

2. Sopa paraguaya – Paraguay

Sometimes you can’t take things literally, like this national dish from Paraguay. Sopa de paraguaya is not soup in the conventional sense. Similar to cornbread, the dish is often baked in the juices of a roasted chicken and made with cornmeal, eggs, chopped onions, cheese, cottage cheese, milk and lard.

3. Sancocho – Panama

Noted as the national dish of Panama, sancocho can also be seen on the menus of countries including Honduras, Ecuador, Colombia, Dominican Republic and Venezuela. In Panama, the dish is called sancocho de gallina, and is made with chicken, the herb cilantro, mazorca, yuca, otoe, chopped onions, garlic and oregano. If you are suffering from a major hangover, sancocho is said to do the trick for getting you back into shape. 😎 

4. Pabellón criollo – Venezuela

Arepas might be the Venezuelan dish that is most widely known, but the national dish is actually pabellón criollo. White rice, black beans and shredded beef is placed on a plate and sprinkled with some queso palmita on top of the beans. If you want to get *que fancy* with it, ask for a pabellón a caballo, which means adding a fried egg on top.

5. Pupusa – El Salvador

Pupusa sunday!! #pupusa #brunch #homemade

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It doesn’t matter if you are eating them with a fork or with your hands (a common debate), pupusas are DELISH. The thick corn patties are stuffed with cheese and your choice of ingredients ranging from refried beans, chicharrones, and the loroco flower. Slather your pupusa with tomato salsa and curtido, a mixture of pickled cabbage and carrots. Started in 2005, there is even a National Pupusa Day in El Salvador. A holiday you can always be sure to put on your calendar.

6. Gallo pinto – Costa Rica and Nicaragua

Beans and rice. The yin and yang of many Latin American dishes. In Costa Rica and Nicaragua, the combination of this typical dish is called gallo pinto (spotted rooster) and is made with red or black beans, and arroz. The flavor comes from adding in chicken broth and chopped onion, sweet pepper and cilantro.

7. Pastel de choclo – Chile

Pastel de choclo is eaten in Chile, Argentina, Peru and Bolivia and uses ground up sweetcorn to make a paste. The paste is mixed in with some basil for a little kick and layered on top of a filling. Pino is used as the filling, which is onion, paprika and other spices cooked with minced beef.

8. Asados – Argentina

Grilling meat is one of the favorite pastimes for Argentines. It’s an opportunity for a communal gathering to talk about the past week, soccer and just have an all around good time. The meat (usually beef and sausage) is grilled on a parrilla and usually takes about two hours to prepare.  

9. Feijoada – Brazil

#feijoada 😋

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The Brazilian version of feijoada is often served with pork trimmings (ears, feet and tail), bacon, sausage, jerked beef, black beans and some rice. Depending on the region in Brazil you are eating this dish in, additional items are included, such as kale, bananas, celery and pumpkin.

10. Salteñas – Bolivia

Say it with us—savory foods are the holy grail of food. These baked type of empanadas are a little bit of sweet and spicy, often filled with a type of meat, raisins, olives, and potatoes. Fun facts: this empanada is named after the Argentine city of Salta and are baked upright instead of lying on their side.

11. La bandera – Dominican Republic

Papá (mi abuelo paterno) muy Cibaeño Dominicano decía: "Que comer comida calentá' daba cuaja" Básicamente decía que comer recalentado causaba pereza 🤣 Pero que Sabiondo Papá para que le hicieran su comida todos los días. Con este estilo de vida tan agitado, estos horarios de trabajo tan locos y esa comida que queda del día anterior y quien se resiste a no comérsela?! Felicito a todas (os) que pueden cocinar las 3 calientes todos los días… Yo mientras me voy a cenar este Calentao' Díganme a ver que opinan 🙄 . . . . . #cocinandoencasadeliz #cenandoencasadeliz #arrozconhabichuelas #ycarne #arrozconhabichuela #habichuelasguisadas #habichuelasrojasguisadas #labanderadominicana #albondigasguisadas #fritosmaduros #ensaladaverde #comidadominicana #dominicancooking #cocinadominicana #comidahechaencasa #rutagourmetdo #afuegoalto #dominicanfood #gastronomiadominicana #comidacalenta #recalentado #leftoverfood

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Literally translated as “the flag,” this Dominican dish often features stewed meat, rice and beans to represent the tricolored flag. The dish is also called “plato del día” or “el almuerzo” and is commonly eaten for lunch with a side of tostones, avocado and a side salad. SIGN US UP for this meal!

Are there any dishes on the list that you want to try? If so, share this article with your friends!


READ: In Case You Weren’t Already Aware, These Latino ‘Junk Food’ Snacks Are Totally Vegan

[Video] A Venezuelan Woman Is Sharing The Story Of Her Mother’s Tragic Death Through A Magically Hypnotic And Dark Act

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[Video] A Venezuelan Woman Is Sharing The Story Of Her Mother’s Tragic Death Through A Magically Hypnotic And Dark Act

daniadiaz.com

Women are magic — particularly Dania Díaz, who brought judges and audience members of “Spain’s Got Talent” to their feet with her entrancing card tricks that also told a heart-rending story.

The Venezuelan native, who had only been living in Spain for a few months before auditioning for the talent show, captivated viewers everywhere. The 28-year-old cleverly shared her story, from being a child in South America who lost her mother, to first discovering and falling in love with magic, to leaving her beloved country in the midst of a crisis to follow her dreams, through a deck of cards, wowing the audience, and at times bringing them to tears, with her incredible presentation.

Díaz shared her story of heart-ache through a magic trick on “Spain’s Got Talent.”

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Lo que hace esta chica emociona a todos! 😱😍

Posted by Lo Mejor De La Red on Wednesday, January 9, 2019

“I’m Dania, I’m a magician and I’m from Venezuela,” she says in Spanish while starting her show shuffling cards. 

“Venezuela is a very big country with more than 30 million inhabitants. 31,529,000 to be precise,” enthralling the previously confused audience as she lays out the cards 3,1, 5, 2 and 9.

Díaz, who continues to wow as she describes Venezuela’s sizable waterfalls through her deck, then begins to share her story. She has two brothers, Daniel and Leo, and was raised in a single-parent home.

“My mother was the queen of the house,” she says, pulling out a queen, “and my father, my father was not very present. In fact, I was happy to see him three or four times a month,” sliding his king card away from the queen.

But that’s not the saddest part of Díaz’s story. The magician reveals that at age 10, her mother suddenly and unexpectedly passed away.

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No solo me vine a reencontrar con mis personas favoritas en esta ciudad, sino que #Venezuela me sigue regalando amigos 🇻🇪 En 2018 conocí a #PattyCardozo una #GuaraEnEspaña, ella me seguía desde mucho antes de migrar a España y yo empecé a hacerlo justo cuando llegué, un día lleno de dudas me senté con ella y creo que fui uno de los tantos venezolanos que han hecho sesión con ella, admiro su proyecto de migracoaching porque atiende el tema emocional, pues no se trata de meter cosas en la maleta, sino de meter tu vida y tus afectos, apenas regresé coincidimos, y como si fueramos amigos de años, sin planificarlo mucho, todo se dio para volver a reirnos juntos. No se pierdan su proyecto en 👉🏼 @patty_cardozo 👜 En 2018 también conocí el talento de #DaniaDiaz que como muchos supimos de ella cuando se viralizó su participación en #SpainGotTalent, era #LaMagaVenezolana que nos sacó una lagrimita de alegría con su destreza en las cartas, con ese momentazo se ganó un lugar en mi #ConteoLos100Del2018 e incluso pasó a la segunda ronda del Top 25 elegido por el público. Llena de proyectos, esta lista para llenar a España con su magia, y si #DePuntoFijoPalMundo, no le pierdan pista como @daniadiaz1 ♣️ Que felicidad verlas emprendiendo, ellas como muchas más, demuestran que las mujeres venezolanas siempre resuelven, aquí nadie quiere que le regalen nada, solo necesitamos la oportunidad de demostrar lo que somos 👊🏼 #VenezolanosEnMadrid #AhoraQuienBajaALaSraDeAhi #ApreciationPostAlTumbaoDeDania

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“Our lives were never the same again. Mine took a 180-degree turn. I think of her 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year,” she said, effortlessly drawing those numbers from her deck as she spoke.

It wasn’t until the-then child discovered magic that she found happiness again. One day, while watching television,  she saw a magician appear on a program. “My heart jumped for joy. I had fallen in love,” she said, tugging a hearts. 

Díaz has been a practicing magician for the last eight years. She immigrated to Spain, like many who leave Latin America, for an opportunity to fully realize her dreams.

“I came to Spain in search of a future, a future that in my country I could not have anymore. And even though I knew that many things awaited me along the way, what I did not expect was to fall in love: to love its culture, its food, and its people,” she said, flipping her cards to suddenly reveal words and images that illustrated what she was sharing.

The illusionist, who prompted laughter from the astonished crowd when she shared the two countries’ different vernacular, ended her demonstration with some inspiration.

“Despite all these differences, there is something we have in common, and that is that everyone in the world is in search for a dream,” she said, flipping cards to reveal related hand-drawn images. “No matter how chaotic your life is at this moment, I invite you to have a little patience, because little by little your life will take order, everything will have a meaning. I’m telling you, this story has taken me here.”

Díaz’s show left both the audience and some judges in tears. They all stood up in applause chanting “golden pass, golden pass.” She did, indeed, receive the pass and was sent into the semifinal of the auditions.

The performer, who now has more than 110 thousand followers on Instagram, is known around Latin America for her charismatic story-telling magic. In addition to her starlight audition, she has won awards, like the FLASOMA prize, given to her by the Latin American Federation of Magical Societies, as well as rewards from Chile, Colombia, Venezuela and the National Congress of Spain.

Díaz, who has performed in 11 countries, travels the world, bringing astonishment to thousands through her feel-good tricks. 

And she has shown for everyone. According to Díaz’s website, she does performances for families, which includes an interactive experience mixing magic, music, and stories that inspire viewers to laugh and dream; for adults, where she reads minds and swallows balloons; and even for business settings, which could be catered to the mission of the corporations. 

For those magic-lovers who are unable to see her live, Díaz also shows some of her mind-boggling tricks on her YouTube channel and on Instagram.

In one of her latest stunts, she takes on the viral bottle cap challenge, removing the top of a bottle without ever touching its lid. In another, she makes a wildly big coin appear, disappear and reappear in her hand.

After watching her magical short clips, you’ll understand why hundreds of thousands of people from across the world are stunned by the Venezuelan maga.

This Argentine Doctor Saved Millions Of Lives With A Groundbreaking Surgery And Now He Has His Own Google Doodle

Culture

This Argentine Doctor Saved Millions Of Lives With A Groundbreaking Surgery And Now He Has His Own Google Doodle

Google

Google has become well known for it’s regularly tributed to some of the most famed people in history. Unsurprisingly, Latinos make up a massive bundle of Google’s over 900 doodles.

And today, Google is honoring an Argentine doctor who contributed one of the most commonly used medical procedures to the world – saving millions of lives in the process.

The legacy of Argentine surgeon Rene Favaloro is being remembered by a Google Doodle today on what would have been his 96th birthday.

Credit: @CleClinicNews / Twitter

René Favaloro, a pioneering Argentine heart surgeon, is being remembered with a Google Doodle for his contributions to coronary bypass surgery on what would have been his 96th birthday.

Born in La Plata, Argentina, in 1923, Favaloro started his career as a doctor in the farming community of Jacinto Arauz, where he built his own operating room, trained nurses and set up a local blood bank.

In 1962 he moved to the United States where he pioneered coronary bypass surgery, a technique used to restore blood flow to the heart when the vessel supplying it is blocked.

René Favaloro was a pioneer in cardiac surgery and his discovery has saved countless lives.

Credit: @American_Heart / Twitter

Favaloro developed a method using a vein from the leg, implanting it to bypass the blockage in the coronary artery. He performed the first operation of this kind on a 51 year-old woman at the Cleveland Clinic in 1967. The historic operation was a success and the procedure has saved countless lives since then.

Today, coronary artery bypass surgery is one of the most common operations. Doctors performed 213,700 in the U.S. in 2011.

But who was René Favaloro?

Credit: @newscientist / Twitter

Rene Favaloro was born in 1923 in La Plata, Argentina and went on to earn a degree in medicine from the National University of La Plata in 1948.

He worked as a doctor in his home country for a time before moving to the US to study thoracic and cardiovascular surgery at the Cleveland Clinic

Favaloro returned to Argentina in 1972, where he would later found his own medical institution, the Favaloro Foundation.

While Favaloro himself was reluctant to be known as the “father” of coronary bypass surgery, his work played a fundamental role in introducing the procedure into the clinical arena.

Of his legacy, Favaloro wrote: “’We’ is more important than ‘I.’ In medicine, the advances are always the result of many efforts accumulated over the years.”

Today, the Favaloro Foundation serves patients based on their medical needs rather than their ability to pay and tecaches Dr Favaloro’s innovative techniques to doctors all over Latin America.

Sadly, his clinic pushed him into debt and he took his own life in 2000.

Credit: @Bravp_MD / Twitter

He took his own life on July 29, 2000 at the age of 77. The day before his death he sent a letter to then-Argentine President Fernando de la Rúa (who died three days ago) asking him for help to secure funding for his foundation, which had become mired in debt as a result of a national economic crisis.

Many took to Twitter to share in their Argentine pride.

Credit: @CleClinicNews / Twitter

Many were excited to see such an important Argentine figure getting global recognition for this contributions to the world.

While other doctors expressed how much they owe to Dr. Favaloro.

Credit: @TIME / Twitter

Without the work of Dr. Favaloro, many doctors pointed out that we could be living in a world where there are a lot more preventable deaths because of heart disease.

READ: 25 Times Latinos Have Graced The Google Doodle

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