Culture

Latinos Had The Most Savage Things To Say About Burger King’s Mental Health ‘Real Meals’

Burger king is here to… help you eat your feelings?

May marks Mental Health Awareness Month and in its Burger King is offering up Real Meals― meals to match your moods.

On Wednesday, the fast food giant launched the burgers while simultaneously taking a sling at its longtime competitor McDonald’s. Their method?

Telling consumers through a series of ads that not all meals have to be so happy.

An ad included in Burger King’s Real Meals campaign captures different people experience various struggles just feeling their feels. This all while singing to the franchise’s “Have It Your Way” tune.

“Not everybody wakes up happy. Sometimes you feel sad, scared, crappy,” one sad character sings in the video.

And releasing a series of five mood-inspired meals.

Burger King’s newest Real Meals come in five different forms: Yaaas Meal, DGAF Meal, Salty Meal, Pissed Meal, and Blue Meal.

Users online are responding to the ad with a WHOLE lot of feels and realness.

As one user pointed out, the franchise really missed the mark when they decided to create music video about people feeling sad and then proceded to give their Unhappy Meals colloquial names.

Including ones on how Burger King can help their employees address their own mental health issues.

FYI the typical Burger King Team Member salary is $8.30 per hour.

Some are even highlighting how poor eating can affect mental health.

And we all know those “Real Meals” which are loaded with whopper burgers aren’t here doing wonders for your physical health.

In fact people were pretty offended.

Because… how bad does capitalism have to get that Burger King starts using mental health to promote their menu?

And of course, tons of Latinos had some pretty fun things to say.

And just about everyone is upset Burger King wont be including a toy in this one at the LEAST.

And some took the time to break down the real problems with the ad.

Burger King’s Real Meals include a Whopper sandwich, fries and a drink and will be available in select locations.

A Woman Lost Her Job At A Panera Bread After She Posted A Viral Video Of Her Warming Up Frozen Mac And Cheese

Entertainment

A Woman Lost Her Job At A Panera Bread After She Posted A Viral Video Of Her Warming Up Frozen Mac And Cheese

@briannaraelenee / TikTok

Social media is a wonderful tool when it comes to connecting with friends across large distances and finding a community. However, social media can also come with its own downfalls. Take the recent lesson learned by TikTok user @briannaraelenee. She posted a video on TikTok from work and it went viral eventually leading to her losing her job. Here’s what went down.

A viral video about Panera Bread’s macaroni and cheese took on a life of its own after it was posted.

The video shows an employee preparing the macaroni and cheese for a customer. The food is frozen in a plastic bag and is dropped into boiling water to warm up. The video isn’t anything revelatory in itself since a lot of restaurants warm up frozen foods that are shipped to locations to insure consistency.

Her next video was dedicated to explaining how the food was still good.

It didn’t take long for the video to go viral. As of the time of this writing, the video had almost 1 million views. Despite the text on her first video of “exposing Panera,” @briannaraelenee told people to keep eating at Panera because the food is delicious.

She quickly followed up with a video near tears apologizing to an Anthony.

The TikTok user really wanted to keep her job. She is making it clear that she likes her job and was not trying to tarnish or attack Panera Bread. One can only assume that she made the video without thinking about it.

She kept her fans, new and old, completely up to date on her journey from Panera employee to unemployed.

She was all smiles when she explained that she was told that she was let go. As she puts it, they were parting ways, like a breakup. She then explained that she is not being fired for the video. Instead, she is being fired because she had her phone out and her nails were too long, both violations of health safety regulations.

The next video showed her in tears as she drove away.

It’s hard to lose a job so unexpectedly. However, it seems that @briannaraelenee saw it coming when her video of the macaroni and cheese started to go viral. It was only a matter of time before people at Panera Bread saw the video.

While some might think she’d be full on clout, she is letting everyone know that it is not the case.

LOL. It’s like becoming famous. As soon as it happens, everyone you ever met is going to come out of nowhere to hit you up. Obviously, they think you are going to do them some kind of favors or will help give them their own social media clout.

The woman took to Twitter to address all of the concerns from followers.

Credit: @BriiRamirezz / Twitter

She is really holding herself up here. Not only is she taking responsibility for what she did, but she is also telling everyone else to calm down.

Not everyone is buying that her tweet was not coerced.

Credit: @SassmastatT / Twitter

You can’t really blame them. Social media is filled with lies and questionable moments. It isn’t too shocking that the Panera employee’s sincere responses to the scandal are being questioned.

Other people are just genuinely impressed with her composure throughout the whole thing.

Credit: @mikegstowe / Twitter

It really is impressive. She took responsibility for her actions and took the consequences in stride.

She does want to leave everyone this one special PSA about phone usage at work.

Solid advice. Hopefully, people can learn from her mistake.

READ: This Man Is Using TikTok To Bring Younger People To Old-School Jams And His Fans Are Loving It

Bruises And Cuts Are Visible, But Emotional Wounds Are Harder To Spot: Monica Lewinsky Launches “Epidemic” A Powerful Anti-Cyberbullying PSA

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Bruises And Cuts Are Visible, But Emotional Wounds Are Harder To Spot: Monica Lewinsky Launches “Epidemic” A Powerful Anti-Cyberbullying PSA

Noam Galai / Getty images

There may be no better person placed in our culture to talk about online bullying and harassment than Monica Lewinsky. Her story has been co-opted and manipulated for personal and political gain purposes for over two decades now. It’s taken long enough for the culture to catch up. She’s been speaking up about this for years and finally, she’s in control of her own narrative. In her latest campaign, the PSA “Epidemic”, Monica Lewinsky wants to raise awareness about the silent and lethal epidemic that is online bullying. 

Online bullying is a silent and lethal form of harassment and Monica Lewinsky wants to raise awareness around this issue so we don’t miss the signs.

credit Youtube The Epidemic

In her latest campaign, the third of a series of ads designed to raise awareness about a silent and lethal epidemic, Monica Lewinsky wants to shine a light on how this silent and invisible this form of bullying can be, and how a psychologically challenging situation can quickly escalate and become physical. In “Epidemic”, we’re introduced to a teenage girl whose health seems to be deteriorating for no apparent reason over the course of the film.  First she stays home from school, she can’t eat, she can’t sleep. In a panic, she reaches out for a bottle of pills. The viewer sees her go from a normal teen to an unconscious girl in an E.R. It’s obvious that she’s been sick all along, but what’s the disease?

The words “The story is not what it seems” appear across the screen. “Go to the-epidemic.com/realstory to get the message.”

Once you follow the link, a new screen message asks viewers to enter their phone number. When the video starts over, the person watching it is receiving the same texts messages that Hailey, the protagonist of the film, is getting. The cruel messages are a deluge of threats, harassment and abuse. And by receiving the texts, viewers don’t just watch it all unfold, they experience it. “It’s like the difference between seeing something in 3D and seeing something in VR,” Lewinsky told Glamour of the campaign’s interactive elements. It makes the abuse that people face on the internet, through their phones, and IRL feel real, immediate, and dangerous. 

Although cyber-bullying happens online, the feeling can be very real, and it can even lead to sickness.

credit Youtube The Epidemic

The feeling of being bullied isn’t just one of fear and shame. Bullying can affect your physical and mental health in potentially dangerous ways. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), being bullied can increase your risk of sleep difficulties, anxiety, depression, headaches, stomachaches, and more. Since bullying can lead to illness, it’s a sort of sickness in itself. Andd that’s exactly what Lewinsky is trying to convey in the PSA in partnership with advertising agency BBDO New York, and Dini von Mueffling Communications.

“We compare [bullying] to an illness for several reasons,” Lewinsky, an anti-bullying advocate, speaker, and former bullying victim, told Teen Vogue. “Just last year, a Pew Research Center survey found that 59% of U.S. teens have been bullied or harassed online. But the problem is, it can be hard to see the signs when somebody is going through something like this. With cyberbullying, even though it may take place online, it has offline consequences — and these consequences range from bad to grave.”

The film was a deeply personal project for Lewinsky who was bullied on a national scale in 1998.

credit Instagram @Notablelife Lewinsky was famously bullied on a national scale after her relationship with former president Bill Clinton went public when she was 24 years old and an intern at the White House. She has personal experience with how severe bullying can be and it’s something she’s spoken out about consistently. It’s that very issue which made this project a challenge she wanted to tackle. “It was hard for me to do this,” she admits. Drawing from her own experiences, Lewinsky, wanted to capture what she calls “that cascading feeling, that overwhelming feeling, the tsunami of texts that come in and the vitriol.” Not just in the video, but in the messages that participants receive. With “The Epidemic”, Lewinsky wants to show victims of bullying that they’re not alone and that they don’t need to remain silent about what they’re going through. 

While bruises and cuts are visible to parents, teachers, and friends, emotional wounds can be harder to spot.

Credit Twitter @MonicaLewnsky

“This is everybody’s worst nightmare—to miss the signs,” Lewinsky said on The Today Show. “And I think one of the best things that we can be doing is have these kinds of conversations, and what we hope to be a positive result from this PSA is that it brings awareness to the kinds of conversations parents should be having with their kids.” Lewinsky who is now 46 years old, remembers that when she was growing up, her parents would tell her, “Be home by sundown.” They wanted her to to be safe. But now, as she notes, “kids can be safe in their physical home, but they’re not emotionally safe because of what may be happening online.” 

The PSA supports a several organizations, including Amanda Todd Legacy, The Childhood Resilience Foundation, Crisis Text Line, Defeat The Label, The Diana Award, Ditch The Label, Organization for Social Media Safety, Sandy Hook Promise, Sit With Us, Think Before You Type and The Tyler Clementi Foundation. If you or someone you know is being bullied, tell someone right away or call the bullying hotline to speak with a professional. If you or someone you know is contemplating suicide, call the National Suicide Prevention Hotline at 1-800-273-8255 or text Crisis Text Line at 741-741.