Culture

As LA Teachers Go Into The Second Day Of Their Strike, A GoFundMe Campaign Is Bringing Taco To The Picket Lines

Los Angeles teachers are on strike for the first time in 30 years demanding smaller class sizes, more support staff, and pay raises. The teachers are part of the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD), which is the second largest school district in the nation. As teachers strike for better conditions for their students, a GoFundMe campaign made sure they will stay fed to continue their fight. The campaign, called Tacos for Teachers, brought taco trucks to various United Teachers Los Angeles (UTLA) picket lines across Los Angeles County Monday, Jan. 14, the first day of the strike.

Thousands of teachers in the United Teachers Los Angeles (UTLA) union are on strike demanding better conditions for them and their students.

The strikes are impacting more than 900 schools and about 500,000 students. Schools are still open and students are being supervised as teachers strike and protest against Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD).

Students, parents, and Los Angeles residents have been showing support for the teachers by joining the protests and through social media posts.

According to USA Today, some teachers are more concerned with class sizes as they are trying to manage classes with 50 students.

Parents who can have chosen to keep their student shome during the strike in solidarity with the teachers.

The LA teachers strike comes just one year after major teacher strikes throughout West Virginia. In the end, the state of West Virginia raised wages for teachers to end the strike, which gave hope to other teacher strikes throughout the country. However, the LA teachers strike is the biggest protest of educators.

Tacos for Teachers!, a GoFundMe page raised money to make sure teachers are fed and energized for their fight.

CREDIT: CREDIT: UTLA GoFundMe

The campaign was started by Democratic Socialist of Los Angeles (DSA-LA) and the Los Angeles International Socialist Organization (ISO-LA) to show solidarity with the teachers and staff who are on strike. Max Belasco, a community organizer for DSA-LA, says the campaign took off after collaborating with ISO-LA and agreed they wanted to create an avenue for support for teachers. He notes that many of his colleagues are part of the UTLA union so this issue hit close to home for him. Many people have asked about ways they can give back to instructors and Belasco thought that food was the best option here.

“Obviously we want people to come out and support but many work during the hours they’d be striking so why not show solidarity in the form of tacos,” Belasco said. “Everyone in LA loves tacos and if it helps feed our hard-working teachers even better.”

Belasco says the contributions have been much larger than originally anticipated as he expected to receive about $1,000 to have one taco truck. However, donations have surpassed its campaign goal of $5,000. By Tuesday, the second day of strikes, the campaign has raised over $22,000 to feed teachers on strike.

The strike has gotten national attention and support from teachers across the country who have contributed to the campaign.

“What’s cool is we’ve gotten support from teachers across the country in places like Chicago and even Virginia,” Belasco said. “The country is watching the strike and they’re giving to a good cause as well.”

The LAUSD is nation’s second largest school district and stretches across 710 square miles across LA county. Seventy-three percent of its students are Latino and are low-income as more than 80 percent of its students get free or reduced-price lunches. Belasco says these teachers are striking for more than just pay raises but better teaching environments that include smaller classrooms and new materials.

“These teachers are fighting for the future of these kids and are taking leave without pay because they believe its a fight for not only for public schools in LA but for education,” Belasco said.

Teachers are being treated to more than just tacos as students and community members pitch in to feed the teachers.

These small gestures from students have kept teachers energized in their battle for better teaching conditions.

It’s clear that the communities they serve are behind them and their fight.

Parents of LAUSD students are posting photos and messages of support calling on others to get behind the teachers who educate and care for their children.

As the strike enters its second day, teachers are standing firm in their fight.

Red is the color of solidarity for the teachers strike. #RedforEd

Only time will tell if the strike initiates the change that teachers are demanding.

Do you stand with the teachers on strike? Let us know.


READ: 21 Different Types Of Tamales You Are Definitely Eating For The Next Few Months Because Leftovers

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If You Are Looking For A Vegan Taco Crawl In Los Angeles, We Just Created It For You

Culture

If You Are Looking For A Vegan Taco Crawl In Los Angeles, We Just Created It For You

fatveganguy / Instagram

There might officially be more veganos than vegans in America, but nobody is really keeping track of Latino-American diets. For all the veganos out there looking for their next food-tour vacation, forget Portland. Los Angeles is where all of the best vegan tacos and Mexican food calls home.

Almost every taco truck would be able to accommodate you, and, yes, know whether their frijoles are vegan, because we’re everywhere in L.A. In such a competitive market for hungry vegan Latinos, we’ve generated a list of the top vegan tacos in Los Angeles. If you’re not hungry now, you’re about to be.

1. Cena Vegan

@grubshots / Instagram

Cena Vegan’s fame is all in their homemade vegan meats. The meats are so good that you can order them in bulk to use at home. At the truck, you can get carne asada, pollo asado, al pastor and a gluten-free carnitas meat option. Then, you add it to tacos, burritos, nacho boats, etc.

This Instagram reviewer puts it bluntly, “literally how are these vegan HOW. @cenavegan you’re magic.”

They’re a winner for obvious reasons.

@veganthisweekend / Instagram

You can try all four taco meats and get four tacos for $11, without having to worry if the beans are cooked in lard, or if the crema is really vegan. It’s all vegan and so good.

2. Vegatinos Food Truck

@vegatinos / Instagram

They love to serve up their vegan shrimp tacos. The few times we can find vegan shrimp are usually at all-vegan Asian restaurants. Shrimp tacos?! Only in Los Angeles.

At Vegatinos, you can get suadero and chicharron tacos before enjoying some vegan flan. 😭

@vegatinos / Instagram

Quintin L. had some interesting things to say about Vegatinos in his Yelp Review. “I’m so in love with these freaking rockstar tacos… it feels like cheating on someone because everything tastes so good that it feels like you’re doing something naughty.”

3. Plant Food for People

@plantfoodforppl / Instagram

PPFP isn’t making high-protein vegan meats like Cena, but they’re keeping it classic in a different way with signature jackfruit tacos made four different ways. Plus, you can also get their breakfast tacos made with tofu and potato scramble if you get there early enough.

4. Hijo De Su Madre

@vegnews / Instagram

From left to right, we have a beer-battered avocado, chipotle crema, and pepita slaw; soyrizo, potato hash, and guac; Beyond Meat cabbage, avocado, secret sauce. That’s not even all their options because Hijo is all-vegan.

5. Dear Mama LA

@dearmamala / Instagram

You definitely want to check out this Latina-owned taco spot when you are in LA. Her caption reads, “This hood inspired traditional flavor is just what summer needed. Our citrus marinated chick’n or Hood Chick’n will have you reminiscing on the days you were a kid and you had carne asadas with the family. This hood staple of yellow looking chicken was what most kids enjoyed! So I’m bringing it back to you with a whole lot of love. We marinate it to perfection with oranges and bell peppers and of course love 🥰🙆‍♀️🔥”

6. Trejo’s Tacos Fried Avocado Tacos

@trejostacos / Instagram

Danny Trejo has outdone himself with a chain of authentic Mexican tacos all around Los Angeles. Danny knows his clients well by offering the only version of an avocado toast we want to have for breakfast: Fried Avocado Tacos.

You should also check out their Cauliflower Chorizo Tacos.

@trejostacos / Instagram

Listen, his taco game is on point. Trejo’s alway has at least three vegan options on the menu. As of June 2019, he has Young Jackfruit with avocado crema, Mushroom Asada with pepita pesto, and Cauliflower with cashew cream.

7. Doomies Home Cookin’ and Doomies NextMex

@plantpoweredchica / Instagram

Doomies is best known for replicating America’s favorite meat dishes (like fried chicken, and Big Macs) but vegan. The reviews are in and Next Mex is where it’s at.

8. Gracias Madre

@gmweho / Instagram

This restaurant is reserved for those special nights out. It’s LA prices, but it’s outrageously delicious. You can expect to enjoy all your vegan favorites from sopes to pozole, flautas and tamales. Their jackfruit carnitas tacos are rico. top it off with flan or pineapple upside down cake and you’ll be happy as a vegan clam.

9. Olga’s Naturally

@olgasnaturally / Instagram

All their taco tortillas are handmade using organic blue maiz from Oaxaca. They always strive to source organic and also offer vegan chicken as a protein option, alongside vegan cheese quesadillas. Yup.

10. Sage Vegan Bistro

@thekindsage / Instagram

It isn’t a taco joint but they do have great tacos. Plus, they know to call them street tacos. These are “made w/ marinated jackfruit, garlic aioli, cilantro and onions on an organic corn tortilla are served all day on weekdays and after brunch on the weekends! 🌮”

11. Organix LA

@organixla / Instagram

They take Taco Tuesday very seriously with $2 vegan tacos and 20 percent off all vegan burritos. All their food is vegan, and you can enjoy anything from deep-fried vegan fish filet tacos to classic carne asada style grilled mushroom tacos like the ones you see above.

12. Chica’s Tacos

Charmaine L. / Yelp

Chica’s vegan tacos are made with spicy cauliflower chorizo and topped with a slice of marinated mushroom, avocado, and cilantro. You know they’re good because Chica’s stands by using only organic, never frozen ingredients to represent an authentic Méxican dish.

13. Un Solo Sol

@unsolosol / Instagram

They essentially offer a vegan version of almost everything on their menu ranging from nopalitos tacos to pinto bean pupusas. You know when you order veggie tacos at a non-vegan taquería and it’s just onions and pico de gallo? These guys load up their veggie tacos with actual veggies ricos.

14. Tacos La Tehuanita

@tacoslatehuanita / Instagram

Follow @tacoslatehuanita to get all the updates on where they’re parked tonight. “Yum! Come one, come all, come with hearty appetites,” are the types of rallying calls you can expect from them. You want to try the butternut squash tacos.

15. Taco Zone Truck

Alex V. / Yelp

Yelp reviewer Helen J. Puts it best. “VEGAN AND VEGETARIANS WELCOME HERE. The tacos are cheap but full of flavor. We came down here after the Griffith Observatory and these tacos hit the spot! Great food truck, friendly service, and fast at that.”

16. El Chato Taco Truck

@_malibudream_ / Instagram

Folks rave about how you can feast and still have a pile of money leftover at El Chatos. While reviewers aren’t posting pictures of the vegan option, there are a dozen reviews about how delicious the veggie tacos are. It can never hurt to check it out.

17. Guisados

@guisados / Instagram

Above are the two vegetarian options listed on the menu. We bet you could ask for it sin cotija, but the off-menu vegan accommodation is reportedly spicy. One Yelp reviewer said, “My friend who is vegan, was able to be accommodated at this place as well! He ended up getting the chiles correados taco. BEWARE!! It is extremely spicy ! But he really loved it !”

READ: 19 Dessert Tacos That Will Make Your Mouth Water

Broccoli and Potato Tacos With Fried Eggs? The New York Times Just Got Ripped For Their Latest Recipe

Culture

Broccoli and Potato Tacos With Fried Eggs? The New York Times Just Got Ripped For Their Latest Recipe

@nytimes / @miblogestublog / Twitter

It’s pretty hard to mess up a good taco. Yet the New York Time’s latest recipe does just that. Roasted broccoli and potato tacos with fried eggs anyone? Didn’t think so. The recipe post was met with criticism online from people questioning everything from the use of broccoli on tacos to the time it takes to put the meal together. Here are some of the best reactions from this taco monstrosity.

Here is the latest recipe from The New York Times that has saddened Twitter users.

There is nothing wrong with changing things up. However, some times you just shouldn’t mess around with good, strong classic dish. Tacos, while super diverse when it comes to fillings, is something that fans think can be taken too far. The New York Times is learning that with their broccoli and potato taco recipe.

First and foremost having broccoli on a taco is a definite no-no.

Credit: @NerdyLadd / Twitter

One of the best parts about tacos is the creative toppings you can place on top of them. That doesn’t necessarily mean anything can go on top it, especially broccoli. It’s vegetable that tastes better as a side piece to your meal, not on top of it.

The recipe got people riled up and rightfully so.

Credit: @AnthonyBialy / Twitter

There’s always room for new takes on classic food and that’s fine. But when you mess with something as great and beloved as tacos, it better be good. In this case, the recipe was a flop and people let the NY Times know.

Besides the recipe, who wants to wait 45 minutes to make taco?

Credit: @artnewgeek / Twitter

Tacos are a go-to food because of how and easy they are to put together. But 45 minutes? Many have taken to social media to voice their grievance about the time it takes to put these together.

One user said, “45 minutes for tacos? Unless 30 of those are kneading and rolling the dough for your own tortillas.”

Just because you put something on a tortilla doesn’t qualify it as a taco.

Credit: @DiegoBernalTX / Twitter

Let’s also point out that having broccoli, potatoes, avocados and an egg on a tortilla would make the whole thing tear right through. It just doesn’t make any sense, let alone calling it a “taco” is another insult.

Can you imagine what our abuelas would say if we served this at dinner?

Credit: @GoAskAlice67 / Twitter

If you want to anger our abuelas this might be the dish to go with. They’ve taught you better and showing up to dinner with these will surely leave at the receiving end of a pow-pow.

People were quick to point out this isn’t the first time the New York Times has tried gentrifying a Latino dish.

Credit: @nytimes / Twitter

Who remembers guacamole with peas? Of course you don’t because I don’t think anyone would ever dare putting peas in the guacamole. Yet time and time again the New York Times tries reintroducing these Latin dishes with their own take and fails.

There’s really nothing worse than someone’s take on a classic dish and manages to ruin it all together. Stick to what you know.

So if we can’t call these tacos, what are they? I think this takes the cake.

Credit: @Emmerbetic / Twitter

This Twitter user might have nailed it right on the head with this one. Say hello to “tostadas gringadas”. A creation straight from the kitchen of one gentrifying New Yorker who managed to ruin tacos and scar our tortilla loving hearts.

The whole thing has brought people to tears so The New York Times should learn how to make tacos everyone can enjoy.

These tears are very real. People would love to see cool and interesting tacos but these are just physically impossible. Like, how does one really eat a taco this packed?

READ: Food And Wine Learned A Valuable Lesson About Respecting The Cultures Of Foods They Are Covering After This Concha Fiasco

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