Culture

20 Different Versions Of Arroz Con Frijoles You’ll Find In Latin America

While most Latin American countries have overthrown our colonizing nations of Spain and Portugal we decided to keep the imported long-grain rice and make it better.

Rice and beans is so integral to our culture these days, it gets personal when an argument ensues between someone who thinks their country’s Arroz Con Frijoles are better than yours.

1. Casamiento | El Salvador 🇸🇻

CREDIT: “beans_and_rice.” Digital Image. Bauman College. 25 May 2018.


Literally meaning a marriage of two, the Salvis know how to make every meal a celebration. You can make this “crispy” or “soft” depending on how much black bean broth you add to the dish.

2. Arroz Congri | Cuba 🇨🇺

Arroz Con Frijoles
CREDIT: “The aroma that fills your kitchen while cooking this Cuban rice dish will make you want to pump up the salsa music and grab a mojito!” Digital Image. Skinny Taste. 25 May 2018.


Every Cuban (and Puerto Rican) knows to never drain the Goya can of black beans. That liquid is gold. You use 1 cup rice, dump that can in the pot, and use the can as a measuring cup to make sure you get all the flavor to add another can of water.

3. Feijoada | Brazil 🇧🇷

CREDIT: @goomet / Instagram


This is more like a black bean stew and of course there are chunks of ham all up in this. It’s Brazileano. 🇧🇷

4. Platillo Moros y Cristianos | Mexico 🇲🇽

CREDIT: “moros y cristianos | black beans and rice recipe” Digital Image. Mexico in My Kitchen. 25 May 2018.


Inspired by a Cuban influence, you serve this Mexican dish with pork chops and plantains, no question. The uniquely Mexicano part of this dish is that you cook it with a dash of oregano. Rico!

P.S.- Does “The Christians and the Moors” namesake trigger post-colonial grief or what?

5. Habichuelas Guisadas | Puerto Rico 🇵🇷

CREDIT: “Puerto Rican Rice and Beans (Habichuelas Guisadas) | Easy recipe for authentic Puerto Rican style red beans and white rice!” Digital Image. Kitchen Gidget. 25 May 2018.


I’m biased, but there is nothing better than this sofrito based dish. You use red or kidney beans and the potatoes soak up all the flavor. Puerto Ricans know that green olives are meant to be simmered in with this, and all served up with tostones.

6. Arroz con gandules | Puerto Rico 🇵🇷

CREDIT: Untitled. Digital Image. Goya. 25 May 2018.


We killin’ it, what can I say. Arroz con gandules is traditionally cooked with sofrito, pigeon peas, rice and pulled pork all in the same pot. All the flavors mix together and it’s the ultimate comfort food.

7. Moro de Habichuelas | Dominican Republic 🇩🇴

CREDIT: @elsacaferestaurant / Instagram


Similar to the boricua version, in that Dominicanos know to add those green olives. This dish is known for it’s subtle thyme flavor as well! #pinkiesout

8. Gallo Pinto | Nicaragua 🇳🇮

CREDIT: @peopleplatesandplanet / Instagram


Meaning “Spotted Rooster”, the dish is said to look like the wing of a spotted rooster. Gallo pinto is traditionally served as breakfast with scrambled or fried eggs.

9. Calentado Paisa | Colombia 🇨🇴

CREDIT: @agustindg / Instagram


I love Colombians for serving this on arepas con huevos. Traditionally, it’s made with leftover beans and rice and is all cooked together with a cup of fresh tomatoes.

10. Tacu Tacu | Peru 🇵🇪

CREDIT: Untitled. Digital Image. Goya. 25 May 2018.


Latinos know how to make the most of leftover rice and beans. Puruvians, specifically, turn it into a masterpiece. Traditionally using rice and canary beans, it’s formed into a large patty and fried on the skillet.

11. Rice and Beans | North Coast Honduras 🇭🇳

CREDIT: “Rice and Beans with Coconut Milk (Resanbinsi)” Digital Image. Saveur. 25 May 2018.


Typically prepared with coconut milk, this take is creamy AF. Add some coriander and chicharrones and you’ve got a Honduran staple.

12. Pabellón Criollo | Venezuela

CREDIT: Untitled. Digital Image. Goya. 25 May 2018.


In Venezuela, you keep the rice and beans separate, and enjoy the mezcla of a rich black bean stew with platains, shredded pork and rice as the flavors meet for the first time. I’m hungry.

13. Cuban Rice and Beans

CREDIT: @eatingthecaribbean / Instagram


If you go to any Cuban restaurant in Miami, they will serve you rice and beans like this. It’ll be soft white rice with a Cuban black bean stew that’s been refried and flavor seeping all through every other meat and tostone on your plate.

14. Arroz Mamposteao | Puerto Rico 🇵🇷

CREDIT: @lacocinadechristina / Instagram


What’s different about this recipe is that you cook the rice first. Then you cook up your bacon or pancetta, add onions and peppers, and Sazón, Adobo, cumin, sofrito and beans. You add the rice at the end and the whole thing ends up being this creamy, soft rice dish.

15. Frijoles Negros | Caribbean Countries

CREDIT: @katq922 / Instagram


Then of course, there’s the option to cook the rice and beans separately. Cuba, Venezuela, Puerto rico, and Mexico are known for making this with ham hocks, onions and garlic, cumin, oregano and sometimes tomatoes. These next few are different variations of rice and beans that can be combined.

16. Frijoles Charros | Mexico 🇲🇽

CREDIT: Untitled. Digital Image. Goya. 25 May 2018.


“Cowboy beans,” frijoles charros are pinto beans simmered in tomato sauce with bacon and chile. The dish is named after the actual Mexican charros who cooked their frijoles a la charra over an open fire while on the range. Try this with arroz amarillo and try not to cry.

17. Fríjoles Colombianos | Colombia 🇨🇴

CREDIT: Untitled. Digital Image. Goya. 25 May 2018.


Colombianos rightfully cannot have their beans without a diced green (or ripe) plantain in the dish. Some versions also include pig’s feet, but every version uses red cargamanto beans, potatoes and garlic. Traditionally served with white rice, but you can use brown rice if you tryna be healthy.

18. Yellow Rice | Caribbean Countries

CREDIT: Untitled. Digital Image. Goya. 25 May 2018.


If you’re my mom, you just use Goya’s Arroz Amarillo boxed rice, but you can also tint your rice with Badia’s Annatto Achiote oil if you protest Spanish saffron.

19. Arroz con Huevo Frito | Caribbean Countries

CREDIT: @foodyatheart / Instagram

OK, not traditionally served with beans but such a childhood cult classic. We were always stoked when my non-Latino dad went out of town because it meant my mom would fry up leftover rice and top it with a runny fried egg. There are many ways to dye rice yellow. 😂

20. Spanish Rice | Mexico 🇲🇽

CREDIT: “Kitchen and Share © Photographer: http://www.cuidarseesdisfrutar.com.mx/t5/Recetas/Arroz-rojo/idi-p/1462” Digital Image. Cocina y Comparte. 25 May 2018.

Last, but not least, is the Mexican take on Spanish Rice. You have to blend up a tomato, garlic and onion with chicken broth to form a tomato puree. After frying raw rice, you add the puree and chopped carrots, peas and zuchinni and cook for 20 minutes. Disfrute!

Glass Gem Corn Is Getting A Lot Of Love After A Man Tweeted His First Harvest Of The Season

Culture

Glass Gem Corn Is Getting A Lot Of Love After A Man Tweeted His First Harvest Of The Season

While the Internet might call it “Ghey Corn,” this rainbow-colored corn variety is officially dubbed Glass Gem corn. Not only are there a rainbow of colorful kernels, but they’re also shiny, prompting the ‘Glass’ description. The person responsible for our new favorite, gay-friendly corn is a man by the name of Carl Barnes, who passed in 2016. Barnes enjoyed his life in Oklahoma and cultivated his own personal seed bank passed down from his Cherokee ancestors. Barnes chose to save and replant the seeds from the cobs with the most color, and eventually developed strains of vibrant corn.

One day, Barnes decided to move and asked his friend, Greg Schoen, to protect the seeds. Schoen grew a small handful of the seeds and was shocked when he peeled back the corn stalk to reveal rows and rows of shiny, rainbow-colored corn. Schoen was so excited, he posted the image to his Facebook, and it promptly went viral. Soon, the two cultivated enough seeds to sell online, and people around the country have grown gorgeous varieties.

Green thumbs around the world bought satchels of the precious seed and the following season, were “blown away.”

Credit: @watermicrobe / Twitter

While Schoen may have initiated the first viral sensation over Glass Gem corn in 2012, Ameet Pinto’s viral post has become Mother Nature’s best queer bait yet. With over 7k likes, “I STAN GAY CORN” is the most liked comment. Then, “Taste the rainbow.” 

Some people literally cannot believe this is corn, accusing Pinto of creating a jelly bean cob.

Credit: @mr_plantgeek / Twitter

“Those are just jellybeans ur not foolin me!!!!!” commented one unbeliever. Someone else seems to think that a profitable venture would be to sell the kernels as jelly beans as a scam. Still, others are bringing the negativity to this rainbow party, assuming that because the cob looks different from the mono-crop, that it must be a GMO frankencorn. “Glad to see people trying to live in Chernobyl,” tweets one disbelieving Shane. 

Glass Gem corn is not a GMO crop.

Credit: @Rainmaker1973 / Twitter

In fact, this variety likely healthier than the corn you might buy at a store, which may have been genetically modified rather than artificially selected. Barnes artificially selected the prettiest corn from his crop and decided to grow from those seeds the following year.

When folks hear the story of Carl Barnes, it just adds a whole new depth to the color.

Credit: @CwdickD / Twitter

“Fun fact about these is that they were discovered by a dude who was half-Cherokee and he started growing a sh**load of different corn types to reconnect with his heritage,” tweeted one person. As Barnes was artificially selecting which corn kernels he’d store as seeds for the next year, he grew closer with his Cherokee heritage.

For those of you expecting rainbow colored popcorn, don’t.

Credit: Glass Gem Corn / Facebook

All that’s left of the kernel when you pop the corn is usually that brown kernel skin that gets stuck in your teeth. In the case of Glass Gem corn, you can sort of make out the varying colors of popped kernels, but the popcorn itself is the same color as regular Joe Schmoe popcorn.

The Glass Gem corn isn’t that sweet.

Credit: @SlowFoodUSA / Twitter

According to Pinto, the corn isn’t sweet like yellow corn, so it doesn’t make for good fresh esquites or elotes. All popcorn comes from different varieties of corn that you have to dehydrate to turn into cornmeal or popcorn. “We’ll be eating some colorful popcorn this winter,” Ameet tweeted.

There’s even a Facebook group for Glass Gem growers to share their growing tips and cooking tips.

Credit: Glass Gem Corn / Facebook

In case you were wondering, the Facebook group “Glass Gem Corn” says you can prepare creamy Glass Gem polenta by following these instructions: “Pour into a shallow pan to cool. Cut into squares and lightly brown in a sauté pan.” We don’t know how you do it but keep on making gay polenta, please.

All in all, the Internet is pretty a-maize-d by the gay corn.

Credit: @DonConklin5 / Twitter

“Corn says lgbtq rights,” tweeted one stan. We’re with them. This is one of those moments that we’re allowed to be in wonder over how indigenous folks cultivate the land.

READ: Oaxaca Is Mexico’s Cultural Capital And Home To Its Largest Indigenous Communities, Here’s What You Need To Know

The 13 Most Terrifying Serial Killers That You’ve Never Heard Of In The US

Things That Matter

The 13 Most Terrifying Serial Killers That You’ve Never Heard Of In The US

EvaRisto SA / Getty

While the United States has more serial killers than any other nation, some of the most brutal murderers the world has ever seen came from the Southern Hemisphere. They’ve left hundreds of bodies of children, women and men in their wake, along the way earning grim nicknames like “monster,” “beast,” and “sadist” as the public grappled with their repulsive crimes.

Some of these killers targeted poor, indigenous women and children who lived on the margins of society, police making a horrifying situation even worse by failing to properly investigate the deaths of the victims. While citizens were outraged by the grisly crimes, many of the country’s judicial systems were not structured in a way to handle such gruesome acts, with maximum sentences that did not come close to letting the punishment fit the crime – like a child murderer who went free after just 14 years. 

Mexico: The Poquianchis

Credit: GrupoPeru.com

The “Poquianchis” was the alias given to a group of female serial killers who were guilty of killing hundreds of prostitutes between 1945 and 1964 in Guanajuato, Mexico. The four sisters: Delfina González Valenzuela, María de Jesús, María del Carmen, and María Luisa, owned several brothels in the region, and killed over 150 people – mostly sex workers, their children, and some of their clients.

They are known as the most prolific serial killers in Mexican history.

Mexico: La Mataviejitas

Credit: Grupo de Peritos Profesionales / YouTube

Juana Barraza was a Mexican pro wrestler. What she did after she hung up her mask is terrifying. You’ve heard plenty of La Llorona and El Cucuy stories over the years, but the story of La Mataviejitas is just as scary – and it’s real.

Barazza’s victims were all women who were 60 years old or older. She would gain their trust by helping them with groceries or posing as a nurse. 

Why’d she do it? Barraza says it was her way of releasing pent up anger. She says she was full of anger after her alcoholic mother beat her and would give her away to men when she was only 12.

Colombia: The Beast

Credit: DiarioVasco.com

Luis Garavito definitely earned his nickname “the Beast,” although few beasts would be capable of his atrocities. Garavito admitted to the murder and rape of 140 young boys, but his toll may be closer to 300 victims.

Over a brutal five-year period, from 1994 to 1999, Garavito used food, gifts and cash to lure his young victims, most between the ages of eight and 16. He would occasionally dress as a monk or street vendor to make the children feel safe as he lured them away from their homes and parents. Once he had them in a secluded spot, he would sexually assault them, often torturing them before slitting their throats and dismembering their small bodies.

Colombia: The Sadist of El Charquito

Daniel Camargo Barbosa raped, murdered and dismembered over 150 young girls in Colombia and Ecuador. He earned the name of “The Sadist of El Charquito” for the brutal treatment of his victims, hacking them to pieces with a machete. While Camargo was suspected in the deaths of 80 women and girls, he was eventually arrested in Colombia for the rape and murder of a nine-year old girl. He was convicted and sentenced to 25 years in jail.

He managed to escape from the island prison where he was held, though, making his way through shark-infested water to Ecuador, where he continued his gruesome crimes, raping and killing at least 70 more victims.

Mexico: The Great Blood Sorceress

Magdalena Solís was: a serial killer, a religious fanatic, a leader of a sect, a sex criminal… and responsible for 8 confirmed murders. She killed any dissidents to her faith through sacrifices in which victims were brutally beaten and mutilated. Afterwards, she removed her victims’ hearts and drank their blood.

Some claim that Magdalena was the reincarnation of an Aztec goddess Coatlicue.

Mexico: The Monsters of Ecatepec 

In 2018, Juan Carlos admitted to killing more than 20 women in the Mexico City suburb of Ecatepec in a crime spree shocked the country. His wife, Patricia, has also told police her job was to trick his victims into accompanying her to their “House of Horrors” after luring them with cheap clothes to sell, say prosecutors. 

Once inside the house, Juan Carlos would slit their throats, have sex with the corpses, remove the heart and feed it to his dogs. 

Many of his victims were young mothers, and the couple have admitted to selling a two-month-old baby, after killing its mother. The husband and wife team were later arrested pushing the tot’s pram, but instead of finding the baby the found body parts.

Juan Carlos has also reportedly told a police doctor that he will kill again if he is ever freed.

Argentina: Angel of Death

In a stretch of just 11 months starting in March, 1971, Carlos Eduardo Robledo Puch committed a string of armed robberies, raped two women, assaulted several women and killed 11 people, becoming Argentina’s most prolific serial killer.

While he occasionally worked with an accomplice, at least one of whom died under suspicious circumstances, Robledo Puch never fit the profile of a killer. He was young, attractive, intelligent and from a wealthy family, but he turned his back on his privileged life.

Colombia: The Monster of the Andes

Known as “The Monster of the Andes,” Pedro López was convicted of raping and killing 110 women, but that horrifying body count is just the beginning of his gruesome crimes. López is suspected in the deaths of more than 300 women and girls, sometimes killing two or three a week, as he traveled across South America from Peru to Ecuador to his native Colombia. López showed his predilections earlier in life and was kicked out of his home for molesting his sister.

According to the Sword and Scale podcast, López was almost put to death by tribal leaders in Peru in 1978, but a missionary saved his life and he headed to Colombia where his crime spree continued. He was eventually captured in Ecuador when the bodies of four young girls were discovered.

He was sent to jail for the maximum allowed by Ecuadorian law at the time – just 16 years – but he was freed after 14 for good behavior. His whereabouts are currently unknown. 

Brazil: Gomes da Rocha

Credit: EvaRisto SA / Getty

Over the course of four years, Tiago Henrique Gomes da Rocha killed 39 people. Gomes da Rocha worked as a security guard in Goiania, a small city in central Brazil. In his off hours he rode the streets of the city on his motorbike robbing shops, pharmacies and lottery outlets. He would pretend to mug people, shouting “robbery” at them before simply shooting them dead instead. Gomes da Rocha targeted women and sex workers –  his victims included a 14-year old girl, young women, homeless people, prostitutes, and transvestites.

Peru: The Apostle of Death

God spoke to Pedro Pablo Nakada Ludeña and told him to rid the earth of prostitutes, drug addicts, homosexuals and the homeless – or that’s the justification he used to murder at least 17 people in Peru.

Known as “The Apostle of Death,” Ludeña walked the streets of Lima with a 9 mm gun equipped with a homemade silencer and killed those he felt deserved it, like a 50-year-old woman smoking pot that he passed on the street or a 42-year-old cosmetologist who may have been gay. Police eventually tracked down the “apostle” in 2006, engaging in a shoot-out with him before he was finally captured.

Bolivia: The Killer Actor

Ramiro Artieda was a sex criminal who was responsible for the murder of at least 8 18-year old women between 1937 and 1939, all of whom bared an uncanny resemblance to one another. Ramiro studied drama in the United States, where he learned the techniques that he’d use to help lure his victims. Some of the characters he created to commit his crimes included a film producer, a monk, and a professor. Using these disguises, he took women to secluded areas where he’d sexually abuse and then strangle them.

When he was captured by the authorities, the killer confessed that his intention was to kill any young women that he felt looked like an ex-girlfriend who had dumped him. He was sentenced to death on July 3, 1939.

Brazil: Pedrinho Matador

One of Brazil’s most infamous – and prolific – serial killers was responsible for at least 70 murders, slaying his first victim at at the age of 14. Pedro Rodrigues Filho, also known as “Pedrinho Matador” or Killer Petey. Even before he was born, Filho’s life was not easy – his father beat his pregnant mother so badly, Filho was born with a deformed skull.

He is believed to have killed 10 people by his 18th birthday, including the vice-mayor of his town after he fired his father. When Filho’s father murdered his mother, Filho exacted his revenge, killing the man, cutting out his heart and eating it. Filho was finally captured in 2003. He was convicted of murdering at least 70 people, but going to jail did not stop his crime spree – he murdered at least 40 inmates while he was in prison.

Argentina: The Argentine Vampire

Florencio was a sex criminal suffering from mental illness who, in the 1950s, suffered a delirium that made him believe he was a vampire. This belief lead him to kill 15 women by biting out their jugular veins, and he claimed that drinking blood gave him orgasms. He’d kill his victims by first following them home and then he’d break in through a window when they were alone.

He was caught in February 1960 at the age of 25 while living in a dark cave, since he suffered photophobia. He died a year later in a mental institution.