Culture

Food And Wine Learned A Valuable Lesson About Respecting The Cultures Of Foods They Are Covering After This Concha Fiasco

Some times people discover new things and just can’t quite figure out how to describe them. Other times, people discover things people have been enjoying for centuries and don’t know how to explain it in non-colonizer terms. This is the situation Food and Wine found themselves in when they tweeted about these “sweet brioche-like rolls,” which are really conchas. The food magazine posted the tweet and it wasn’t long before Twitter users dragged them all over the internet for their tweet and the media outlet deleted the tweet but screen grabs are forever.

Here is the now-deleted but preserved tweet from Food and Wine that sparked the Twitter outrage.

CREDIT: @byelsieramos / Twitter

We all know that we were taught to add extra words and be descriptive to add to a word count in school. However, this was just a step too far for some people in the interwebs.

It wasn’t just the wording of the tweet that angered people. It was the cultural insensitivity.

CREDIT: @MGuzman_Detroit / Twitter

Guarantee that no Latino food journalist, Mexican or not, would have called this a “brioche-like” bread. This shows the importance of having people of color working in media to better tell these stories.

Folks were really defending the pan dulce like the cultural treasure it is.

CREDIT: @Salsalito / Twitter

Now all I want is to curl up on a couch with pan dulces and cafecito. Doesn’t that sound like a perfect day in?

The tweet brought out a lot of strong emotions in the hearts of concha-loving people.

CREDIT: @ACMBuckeyes / Twitter

It truly is one of those foods that takes you back to your childhood and holds you closer than any man or woman ever will. ????

Some did see the tweet for what it was: click bait.

CREDIT: @jed_hackett / Twitter

It definitely did the job and caught everyone’s attention. Like, who wouldn’t stop in their tracks after seeing this tweet?

It really is disappointing to see them strip the concha of its ethnic and culture identity.

CREDIT: @raceandfood / Twitter

Far too often, Eurocentric ideals have tried to change and claim parts of different cultures for their benefit. So much of our identity as Latinos is in our food. It is our childhood. It is our uniqueness. And for those of us who were born and raised in the U.S., food serves as one of the most tangible pieces of a home country we’ve never known.

Some people laid it out in simple terms.

CREDIT: @GisEloquent / Twitter

Not ???????? at ???????? all! ???????? Would you call brioche bread a less sweet concha-like bread for a Mexican audience?

Enter the obligatory Columbus reference because folks still honor this behavior.

CREDIT: @mcastimovies / Twitter

Not that people think you can just take land anymore, unless you’re Russia. But non-ethnic folks love finding things our communities have used for decades and act like it’s a brand new food group.

Oh, Food and Wine also considers it a “light breakfast,” which it’s not.

CREDIT: @marcela_elisa / Twitter

Have you never had one? Have you seen the size of these things? How is this a “light breakfast”?

In case folks didn’t know, one person did offer Twitter users facts about the different flavors of conchas that exist.

CREDIT: @IknowuGabriela / Twitter

Personally, I love them all. I could eat these sweet bread any and every day. Who’s going to the panadería with me after work?

Some legitimate questions have been asked about the use of brioche over concha.

CREDIT: @dasher2581 / Twitter

Obviously it is easier to say French words than Spanish words, right?

Also, some people don’t even know wtf is a concha so… ????????‍♂️

CREDIT: @vugetrbl / Twitter

It isn’t that surprising that people would get defensive about the fact that the concha was being stripped of its identity.

Even our dads got in on dragging Food and Wine.

CREDIT: @omoroti / Twitter

Spoke like a true Mexican father. “Que brioche ni que la chingada” indeed.

People are suggesting that they start hiring people of color so, you know, they can be accurate.

CREDIT: @JeronimoSaldana / Twitter

It’s not that hard to understand. If you want content about Latinx culture, hire Latinx people who know and live that culture every day. It’s like expecting Latinx journalists to understand the ins and outs of Japanese cuisine.

The publication didn’t release a statement about the Twitter backlash.

CREDIT: @adrianachavira / Twitter

They simply deleted the tweet and kept moving. However, that’s not how people want to see things resolved online now.

And people were looking for it.

CREDIT: @uxrivas / Twitter

It’s just another day in the office for a digital media company. Things spread far and wide when you put them on the internet and things never disappear once they are online.

Can we all agree that things should not be whitewashed anymore?

CREDIT: @RITucker_23 / Twitter

Just stop. It is not a good look on anyone. Either those whitewashing seem insensitive or the ones who are upset seem unjustly angry. It needs to end.

Leave things as they are and use the real names.

CREDIT: @LaNinaFresa / Twitter

If we, the Latinx community, can learn the difference between brioche and sourdough, you can learn what a concha is.

It really will be better for everyone if we just respect each others cultures.

CREDIT: @takesomeheart / Twitter

It is not that hard to respect each other and our foods. That’s what this how thing is about.

While the publication stayed silent, the woman who runs their social media channels did apologize.

CREDIT: @meg__clark / Twitter

At least someone at Food and Wine was big enough to admit their mistake.


READ: Rogelio De La Vega Is Killing The Game On Twitter And You Just Have To See For Yourself

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Moms Are Sharing Videos Of How To Make Their Comida For Their College-Bound Kids After A Mom’s Burrito-Folding Video Went Viral

Culture

Moms Are Sharing Videos Of How To Make Their Comida For Their College-Bound Kids After A Mom’s Burrito-Folding Video Went Viral

Michelle Gonzaes / YouTube

Last week, California Polytechnic State University student, April Olvera posted a video sent to her by her mamá, and the video went viral, already wracking up nearly ten million views, and nearly one million likes in less than seven days.

Olvera, away at college, texted her mom, Silvia Dominguez, to say that she didn’t know how to fold a burrito, and her mom sent her a video that contained a soothing video-folding lesson.

While some couldn’t help but wonder why Olvera didn’t know how to fold a burro, her mamí’s special brand of cariño shown in the forty-second burrito-folding lesson was the focus of the comments that followed.

Other Latinas needed the lesson too!

Twitter

Another Latina Twitter user, couldn’t get over the way Olvera’s mother, Silvia, repeated the lesson.

Twitter

Two guys commented on Olvera’s mom’s soothing voice, but we think @carys_arsenic nailed it.

Twitter

And this guy too who points out Ms. Dominguez’s calm in the face of a world that seems to be coming apart at the seams.

Twitter

When Olvera told her mother that her video went viral and inspired so many positive comments, Dominguez said, “Maybe it’s not the burrito. Maybe it’s about family and love.”

Burrito-folding-lesson mom, Silvia Dominguez, speaks Spanish in the video, smiling the whole time, clearly happy to be able to help her daughter away at college with anything, using her own phone propped up on the counter to capture the lesson.

“Okay,” she says in Spanish, holding up a corn tortilla, “Imagine that this is my flour tortilla. Add what you’re going to use, fold it from this side, fold it from that side, and roll it. Did you see that?

And then she unrolls the burro and repeats the steps: It’s a circle. Fold it here, fold it here, and roll it. Nice! Okay, bye. I love you.”

We also like how Burrito-Folding-Lesson Mom is even helping grown-ass men.

Twitter
@rsencion
Twitter

And because imitation is the most sincere form of flattery, here’s a video made by the author for her son on his way to college in the fall.

Watch the video below.

READ: Yalitza Aparicio Brought Her Mother To The Oscars And Other Incredible Things Latinas Did Last Night

McDonald’s Now Has Quarter Pounder Scented Candles That You Definitely Didn’t Ask For

Culture

McDonald’s Now Has Quarter Pounder Scented Candles That You Definitely Didn’t Ask For

Celin/ Pinterest

You know that friend whose car always smells like the food they ate the night before? You know the one, it’s the same friend who also has a collection of takeout Wendy’s, Taco Bell and McDonald bags shoved into the pocket of their backseats. Well now, you too can be that friend. Thanks to McDonald’s you can make literally anywhere smell like oily takeout.

McDonald’s announced this week that it will make a six-pack of scented candles that will smell like your favorite Quarter Pounder ingredients.

McDonald's six candles come in all the scents you'd expect.

Anyone familiar with the key ingredients in the beloved QP knows these scents include bun, ketchup, pickles, cheese, beef, and ooh baby onions. In honor of the Quarter Pounder’s 50th birthday, McDonald’s is also releasing a line of merchandise that includes calendars, lockets, mittens, shirts, and pins.

Draw up a romantic bath for you and yours that smells like an oily stove and pickles by getting the items here on the McDonald’s fan club website.