Culture

Food And Wine Learned A Valuable Lesson About Respecting The Cultures Of Foods They Are Covering After This Concha Fiasco

Some times people discover new things and just can’t quite figure out how to describe them. Other times, people discover things people have been enjoying for centuries and don’t know how to explain it in non-colonizer terms. This is the situation Food and Wine found themselves in when they tweeted about these “sweet brioche-like rolls,” which are really conchas. The food magazine posted the tweet and it wasn’t long before Twitter users dragged them all over the internet for their tweet and the media outlet deleted the tweet but screen grabs are forever.

Here is the now-deleted but preserved tweet from Food and Wine that sparked the Twitter outrage.

@byelsieramos / Twitter

We all know that we were taught to add extra words and be descriptive to add to a word count in school. However, this was just a step too far for some people in the interwebs.

It wasn’t just the wording of the tweet that angered people. It was the cultural insensitivity.

@MGuzman_Detroit / Twitter

Guarantee that no Latino food journalist, Mexican or not, would have called this a “brioche-like” bread. This shows the importance of having people of color working in media to better tell these stories.

Folks were really defending the pan dulce like the cultural treasure it is.

@Salsalito / Twitter

Now all I want is to curl up on a couch with pan dulces and cafecito. Doesn’t that sound like a perfect day in?

The tweet brought out a lot of strong emotions in the hearts of concha-loving people.

@ACMBuckeyes / Twitter

It truly is one of those foods that takes you back to your childhood and holds you closer than any man or woman ever will. ????

Some did see the tweet for what it was: click bait.

@jed_hackett / Twitter

It definitely did the job and caught everyone’s attention. Like, who wouldn’t stop in their tracks after seeing this tweet?

It really is disappointing to see them strip the concha of its ethnic and culture identity.

@raceandfood / Twitter

Far too often, Eurocentric ideals have tried to change and claim parts of different cultures for their benefit. So much of our identity as Latinos is in our food. It is our childhood. It is our uniqueness. And for those of us who were born and raised in the U.S., food serves as one of the most tangible pieces of a home country we’ve never known.

Some people laid it out in simple terms.

@GisEloquent / Twitter

Not ???????? at ???????? all! ???????? Would you call brioche bread a less sweet concha-like bread for a Mexican audience?

Enter the obligatory Columbus reference because folks still honor this behavior.

@mcastimovies / Twitter

Not that people think you can just take land anymore, unless you’re Russia. But non-ethnic folks love finding things our communities have used for decades and act like it’s a brand new food group.

Oh, Food and Wine also considers it a “light breakfast,” which it’s not.

@marcela_elisa / Twitter

Have you never had one? Have you seen the size of these things? How is this a “light breakfast”?

In case folks didn’t know, one person did offer Twitter users facts about the different flavors of conchas that exist.

@IknowuGabriela / Twitter

Personally, I love them all. I could eat these sweet bread any and every day. Who’s going to the panadería with me after work?

Some legitimate questions have been asked about the use of brioche over concha.

@dasher2581 / Twitter

Obviously it is easier to say French words than Spanish words, right?

Also, some people don’t even know wtf is a concha so… ????????‍♂️

@vugetrbl / Twitter

It isn’t that surprising that people would get defensive about the fact that the concha was being stripped of its identity.

Even our dads got in on dragging Food and Wine.

@omoroti / Twitter

Spoke like a true Mexican father. “Que brioche ni que la chingada” indeed.

People are suggesting that they start hiring people of color so, you know, they can be accurate.

@JeronimoSaldana / Twitter

It’s not that hard to understand. If you want content about Latinx culture, hire Latinx people who know and live that culture every day. It’s like expecting Latinx journalists to understand the ins and outs of Japanese cuisine.

The publication didn’t release a statement about the Twitter backlash.

@adrianachavira / Twitter

They simply deleted the tweet and kept moving. However, that’s not how people want to see things resolved online now.

And people were looking for it.

@uxrivas / Twitter

It’s just another day in the office for a digital media company. Things spread far and wide when you put them on the internet and things never disappear once they are online.

Can we all agree that things should not be whitewashed anymore?

@RITucker_23 / Twitter

Just stop. It is not a good look on anyone. Either those whitewashing seem insensitive or the ones who are upset seem unjustly angry. It needs to end.

Leave things as they are and use the real names.

@LaNinaFresa / Twitter

If we, the Latinx community, can learn the difference between brioche and sourdough, you can learn what a concha is.

It really will be better for everyone if we just respect each others cultures.

@takesomeheart / Twitter

It is not that hard to respect each other and our foods. That’s what this how thing is about.

While the publication stayed silent, the woman who runs their social media channels did apologize.

@meg__clark / Twitter

At least someone at Food and Wine was big enough to admit their mistake.


READ: Rogelio De La Vega Is Killing The Game On Twitter And You Just Have To See For Yourself

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Viral Video Of Overworked Texas Dominos Workers Burdened By Snow Storm Goes Viral

Things That Matter

Viral Video Of Overworked Texas Dominos Workers Burdened By Snow Storm Goes Viral

Texas’s current power crisis from a devastating storm has disrupted power generation and frozen natural gas pipelines. The is historic storm has driven electric demand higher than the state has ever seen, but it’s not just electric energy being overextended as a result. It’s physical and mental human energy as well.

Recently, an image of two exhausted Domino’s Pizza workers went viral for showing the extreme exhaustion workers are experiencing.

In a post shared to News4sanantonio.com’s Chime In page a user by the name of July DeLuna explained “This Dominos in San Antonio. Working during this crisis. They had a weekend worth of food and it was gone within 4 hours. This team helped those that needed help. These are the essential workers that need recognition. They were the only pizza place open. Every pizza place was closed but dominos stayed open to help those in need.”

Little else is known about the exhausted workers in the viral image but it did rack up over 8K comments within hours of being posted.

“Dominoes better pay them for the shifts they’ll miss while they don’t have any ingredients. With this practical free advertising it’s the least they could do. Otherwise these kind people worked themselves out of already bad hourly pay,” one user commented.

“,As someone who works in the food service industry, the thought of selling out of all product in only four hours and how much work goes in to preparing that much food is unfathomable levels of nightmare fuel,” another noted.

In another response to the image, a Reddit user wrote “I cannot express to you how upsetting it is to be the only food source open during hard times, to still be open and show up to do your job with higher than normal levels of orders, and still get yelled at by management for not having orders out within a window of time.”

Images of overworked and stressed is nothing new of course.

Fast-food workers are often burdened by their field’s daily challenges. In 2020, food industry workers are being forced to endure customer abuse at even higher rates. Last year a TikTok video of a Subway restaurant falling asleep while in the middle of making a sandwich went viral.

“This is actually really sad. I can’t imagine how underslept she is. Not to mention the wage people get paid at Subway… She deserves better,” one TikTok user by the name of Monique Emilia commented at the time. The skincare influencer Hyram also commented writing “Poor thing… Can’t imagine how underslept she is, we’re too hard on service workers.”

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CDC Warns Of Listeria Outbreak Linked To ‘Hispanic-Style’ Cheeses

Culture

CDC Warns Of Listeria Outbreak Linked To ‘Hispanic-Style’ Cheeses

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is warning everyone against “Hispanic-style” cheeses linked to a listeria outbreak. The latest food outbreak is attacking one of the most sacred things in our diets and people have a lot of opinions.

Listeria has been detected in “Hispanic-style” cheeses, according to the CDC.

According to a warning from the CDC, listeria has been detected in what they are calling “Hispanic-style” cheeses. This means that people should avoid queso fresco and queso blanco. The source of the outbreak is being tracked and there is some understanding about where the outbreak is coming from.

The CDC recommends that people avoid these cheeses right now and to make sure that the cheeses they buy are made from “pasteurized milk.” Listeria is a serious illness for the elderly, people who are immunocompromised, and pregnant people.

The CDC reports that Connecticut officials have found Listeria in some El Abuelito queso fresco. The cheese was purchased from a supermarket in the area where a patient purchased “Hispanic-style” cheese. The outbreak seems to be concentrated in the Northeastern United States and has impacted four states.

Seven people have been hospitalized because of the Listeria outbreak.

The announcement is a very personal attack for a lot of people. Queso fresco and queso blanco are very important for a lot of dishes in our cuisine and to go without, during Lent and Covid, is asking a lot of us.

People are kind of irked that the CDC didn’t use a different phrase to talk about the cheese.

We get that technically the cheese is in Spanish and that it is more commonly used in Latino food. However, the cheeses have names that can be used. Sure, there was no idea of the brand but would it really be that hard to say “queso fresco and queso blanco”?

At least it would have prevented other people from having to answer other people’s questions.

It’s called efficiency. Some news outlets were sharing images of yellow queso dip because it is also technically a “Hispanic-style” cheese but it not the cheese in question.

READ: Chuck E Cheese Is Advertising As Pasqually’s Pizza And Thank You

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