Culture

Food And Wine Learned A Valuable Lesson About Respecting The Cultures Of Foods They Are Covering After This Concha Fiasco

Some times people discover new things and just can’t quite figure out how to describe them. Other times, people discover things people have been enjoying for centuries and don’t know how to explain it in non-colonizer terms. This is the situation Food and Wine found themselves in when they tweeted about these “sweet brioche-like rolls,” which are really conchas. The food magazine posted the tweet and it wasn’t long before Twitter users dragged them all over the internet for their tweet and the media outlet deleted the tweet but screen grabs are forever.

Here is the now-deleted but preserved tweet from Food and Wine that sparked the Twitter outrage.

CREDIT: @byelsieramos / Twitter

We all know that we were taught to add extra words and be descriptive to add to a word count in school. However, this was just a step too far for some people in the interwebs.

It wasn’t just the wording of the tweet that angered people. It was the cultural insensitivity.

CREDIT: @MGuzman_Detroit / Twitter

Guarantee that no Latino food journalist, Mexican or not, would have called this a “brioche-like” bread. This shows the importance of having people of color working in media to better tell these stories.

Folks were really defending the pan dulce like the cultural treasure it is.

CREDIT: @Salsalito / Twitter

Now all I want is to curl up on a couch with pan dulces and cafecito. Doesn’t that sound like a perfect day in?

The tweet brought out a lot of strong emotions in the hearts of concha-loving people.

CREDIT: @ACMBuckeyes / Twitter

It truly is one of those foods that takes you back to your childhood and holds you closer than any man or woman ever will. ????

Some did see the tweet for what it was: click bait.

CREDIT: @jed_hackett / Twitter

It definitely did the job and caught everyone’s attention. Like, who wouldn’t stop in their tracks after seeing this tweet?

It really is disappointing to see them strip the concha of its ethnic and culture identity.

CREDIT: @raceandfood / Twitter

Far too often, Eurocentric ideals have tried to change and claim parts of different cultures for their benefit. So much of our identity as Latinos is in our food. It is our childhood. It is our uniqueness. And for those of us who were born and raised in the U.S., food serves as one of the most tangible pieces of a home country we’ve never known.

Some people laid it out in simple terms.

CREDIT: @GisEloquent / Twitter

Not ???????? at ???????? all! ???????? Would you call brioche bread a less sweet concha-like bread for a Mexican audience?

Enter the obligatory Columbus reference because folks still honor this behavior.

CREDIT: @mcastimovies / Twitter

Not that people think you can just take land anymore, unless you’re Russia. But non-ethnic folks love finding things our communities have used for decades and act like it’s a brand new food group.

Oh, Food and Wine also considers it a “light breakfast,” which it’s not.

CREDIT: @marcela_elisa / Twitter

Have you never had one? Have you seen the size of these things? How is this a “light breakfast”?

In case folks didn’t know, one person did offer Twitter users facts about the different flavors of conchas that exist.

CREDIT: @IknowuGabriela / Twitter

Personally, I love them all. I could eat these sweet bread any and every day. Who’s going to the panadería with me after work?

Some legitimate questions have been asked about the use of brioche over concha.

CREDIT: @dasher2581 / Twitter

Obviously it is easier to say French words than Spanish words, right?

Also, some people don’t even know wtf is a concha so… ????????‍♂️

CREDIT: @vugetrbl / Twitter

It isn’t that surprising that people would get defensive about the fact that the concha was being stripped of its identity.

Even our dads got in on dragging Food and Wine.

CREDIT: @omoroti / Twitter

Spoke like a true Mexican father. “Que brioche ni que la chingada” indeed.

People are suggesting that they start hiring people of color so, you know, they can be accurate.

CREDIT: @JeronimoSaldana / Twitter

It’s not that hard to understand. If you want content about Latinx culture, hire Latinx people who know and live that culture every day. It’s like expecting Latinx journalists to understand the ins and outs of Japanese cuisine.

The publication didn’t release a statement about the Twitter backlash.

CREDIT: @adrianachavira / Twitter

They simply deleted the tweet and kept moving. However, that’s not how people want to see things resolved online now.

And people were looking for it.

CREDIT: @uxrivas / Twitter

It’s just another day in the office for a digital media company. Things spread far and wide when you put them on the internet and things never disappear once they are online.

Can we all agree that things should not be whitewashed anymore?

CREDIT: @RITucker_23 / Twitter

Just stop. It is not a good look on anyone. Either those whitewashing seem insensitive or the ones who are upset seem unjustly angry. It needs to end.

Leave things as they are and use the real names.

CREDIT: @LaNinaFresa / Twitter

If we, the Latinx community, can learn the difference between brioche and sourdough, you can learn what a concha is.

It really will be better for everyone if we just respect each others cultures.

CREDIT: @takesomeheart / Twitter

It is not that hard to respect each other and our foods. That’s what this how thing is about.

While the publication stayed silent, the woman who runs their social media channels did apologize.

CREDIT: @meg__clark / Twitter

At least someone at Food and Wine was big enough to admit their mistake.


READ: Rogelio De La Vega Is Killing The Game On Twitter And You Just Have To See For Yourself

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Tamales Elena Is About To Become LA’s First Afro-Mexican Restaurant

Culture

Tamales Elena Is About To Become LA’s First Afro-Mexican Restaurant

tamaleselenayantojitos / Instagram

The Los Angeles food truck Tamales Elena y Antojitos has been serving up authentic Guerrero food for 20 years. Tamales Elena y Antojitos is a staple at E 110th St. & Wilmington Ave. in LA’s Watts neighborhood offering up banana leaf-wrapped tamales. Now, Tamales Elena y Antojitos will become a restaurant.

Tamales Elena y Antojitos is opening up LA’s first Afro-Mexican restaurant.

Not even a pandemic will slow them down. The family behind the famous food truck in Watts will soon be welcoming guests (following COVID-19 guidelines) in Bell Gardens, California. The tamales, pozoles, and array of Afro-Mexican dishes will be served to everyone who has come to adore the Mexican establishment.

The restaurant will add another cuisine to the vast palate that is LA’s food scene.

Los Angeles is home to a diverse and inviting list of restaurants representing cultures from around the world. Some of the best Mexican food in the country can be found in Los Angeles and Tamales Elena y Antojitos is adding another level to that representation. Angelenos are celebrating the Afro-Mexican restaurant staffed and owned by Afro-Mexicans.

The restaurant has a special place in people’s lives.

The family has been offering up their unique food to residents of Watts for 20 years. In two weeks, Maria Elena Lorenzo will be offering up her family recipes in-store to more people as of July 15. The family has spent years in the food industry and have worked hard to make their mark on LA’s food scene.

Lorenzo’s daughters have been played a big role in getting the restaurant going.

According to LA Eater, Lorenzo’s daughters have spent years working in various restaurants around Los Angeles. Her daughters, Maria, Heidi, Judepth, Teresa, and Nayeli spent time working front-of-house and back-of-house at restaurants including Rivera, Petty Cash Taqueria, and Guerrilla Tacos. Heidi Irra worked at Mezcalero in downtown Los Angeles. Now, the daughters are bringing their experience to the family business and helping their mother start her restaurant.

Lorenzo, lovingly known as Mama, is clearly going to have a lot of guests are her restaurant.

Congratulations, Mama! This is one of those stories we love to see. Nothing makes you prouder than watching Latino families come together to chase the American Dream and succeed.

READ: Guelaguetza, One Of LA’s Most Iconic Mexican Restaurants, Is Sharing Some Of Their Recipes On Instagram

Military Members Are Sharing Stories Of Sexual Assult In The Military Using #IAmVanessaGuillen

Things That Matter

Military Members Are Sharing Stories Of Sexual Assult In The Military Using #IAmVanessaGuillen

David Dee Delgado / Getty Images

Vanessa Guillen went missing on April 22 from a parking lot at Fort Hood. Before going missing, Guillen confided in her family about alleged sexual assault and harassment she faced at the U.S. Army base. Her story sparked an online movement to talk about sexual assault in the military.

Women are using #IAmVanessaGuillen to talk about sexual assault in the U.S. military.

It wasn’t until recently that movements like #MeToo and #TimesUp made it clear that society was done with making excuses for sexual assault. Powerful and influential men have fallen because of their behavior. The disappearance of Vanessa Guillen is shining a renewed light on sexual assault in the military.

The stories range from inappropriate behavior from superiors to rape from fellow soldiers.

Women see themselves reflected in Guillen and her story. Former military women are shedding the shame and fear of coming forward to tell their stories in a public space. The unity on social media is offering women comfort and support as they open up about the most personal thing someone can talk about.

Some of the stories are absolutely heartbreaking.

According to a report from the Defense Department, sexual assault in the U.S. military went up 3 percent between fiscal years 2018 and 2019. The department reported 7,825 reports of sexual assault on service members. However, Pentagon officials assert that the change cannot be characterized as an increase in assaults. A prevalence survey on sexual assault in the military is conducted every other year.

According to some women, the assault and harassment started quickly.

The same study found that sexual assault at the 3 military academies saw a spike of 32 percent. The figures show an increase of 117 reported sexual assaults in 2018 compared to 149 sexual assaults reported in the academies.

“Our Academies produce our future leaders. At every turn, we must drive out misconduct in place of good order and discipline. Our data last year, and the findings from this year’s report, reflect the progress we have made in some areas, and the significant work that remains,” Elizabeth Van Winkle, the executive director of the Office of Force Resiliency, said in a statement obtained by ABC News. “We will not falter in our efforts to eliminate these behaviors from our Academies and to inculcate our expectation that all who serve are treated, and treat others, with dignity and respect.”

Some men have also used the hashtag to share their own experiences.

According to the Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network, 1 out of every 10 rape victims is male. The study also shows that 1 out of every 33 men will experience an attempted or completed sexual assault.

If you or someone you know needs to talk to someone, you can call 1 (800) 656-HOPE (4673) or visit RAINN by clicking here.

READ: Partial Human Remains Found Near Fort Hood During Search For Vanessa Guillen