Culture

The Makers Of Corona Beer Are Spending Billions To Get Into The Weed Industry

Grupo Modelo — the company that once owned Corona — has come a long way since they first began to brew beer in 1922. Its Mexican founders sold the rights to Corona to Anheuser-Busch InBev in 2008 in a $20.1 billion deal, and now the Corona is expanding even further.

Corona’s parent company — Constellation Brands — is spending $3.8 billion and investing it in a Canadian weed producer named Canopy Growth.

According to Bloomberg, it’s the largest investment into a weed producer ever. And while some may think it’s a weird idea for a beer brand to be associated with weed, some say this merger is only a sign of good things to come for both industries.

“I think a lot of people are quick to knee jerk this as bad,” Cannabis Now Magazine CEO and publisher Eugenio Garcia told Forbes. “But it is giving a cannabis company access to hundreds of millions [or even billions] of dollars in working capital from which they can make light years faster expressions than any other competitors.”

As more states make weed legal, beer companies are investing in its producers in order to be able to include weed as an ingredient in beer.

CNBC reports that some beers already have weed as ingredient, including Heineken and Molson Coors whom already sell “cannabis-infused drinks.”

“Heineken’s Lagunitas brand has started selling nonalcoholic sparkling water featuring THC, the active component of marijuana. And Molson Coors has formed a joint venture with Hydropothecary, a weed producer, to make cannabis-infused beverages,” CNBC reports.

But just because this billion dollar deal speaks volumes of the growth of the weed industry doesn’t mean that smaller companies won’t be doing the same.

“You’re going to see more of this smaller business model,” Garcia told Forbes. “Much like in the agricultural, farm to table movement around the U.S people will start producing cannabis legally for their immediate geographic locations. You go to any city in the U.S. and you’re going to find a microbrewer that is only putting out enough quantity to support a couple thousand people in their neighborhood. People love that. And that’s going to be very similar, I believe, with cannabis.”

Here’s what people on social media are saying about the beer/weed partnership.

So maybe we won’t notice the difference in taste?

Maybe weed will improve the flavor of Corona?

Corona isn’t the best beer out there, but does it really taste like water?

This guy already has a slogan for the new product.

Not sure if the word “skunky” is gonna sell this drink.

Maybe Bud should have invested in weed….

What a waste of an opportunity. If you’re reading this Bud owners, it’s not too late.


READ:  Here Are The 11 Stages People Who Can’t Handle Weed Go Through When They Get High

Do you think you’d try beer with weed as ingredient? Let us know by sharing this story and commenting below!

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Latino Lawmakers Help Make History As The House Votes To Decriminalize Marijuana Across The Country

Things That Matter

Latino Lawmakers Help Make History As The House Votes To Decriminalize Marijuana Across The Country

David McNew/Getty Images

With much of the nation’s attention focused on the Coronavirus pandemic and Trump’s refusal to concede an election he lost, recent news of a vote in the House of Representatives may have slipped by unnoticed. But it shouldn’t.

The House just made history as it voted to decriminalize cannabis, a historic symbolic moment marking Congress’ very late to the party move toward embracing the views held by a large majority of Americans.

The bill was spearheaded by House Democrats and the entire Congressional Hispanic Caucus voted in favor of the bill, helping ensure its passage. Although it’s largely seen as a symbolic victory for marijuana rights advocates – since the Senate isn’t likely to act: Senate Republicans have indicated there’s no appetite to pass the measure.

The House of Representatives made history by passing a bill to decriminalize marijuana at the federal level.

For the first time in history, a bill decriminalizing marijuana has passed the lower chamber of congress and although it stands zero chance of becoming law, it’s a major milestone towards marijuana legalization.

The Marijuana Opportunity Reinvestment and Expungement (MORE) Act passed the house with 228 in favor and 164 opposed, with only five Republicans voting in favor of the measure and six Democrats voting against it, according to ABC News.

From here, the bill will be sent to the Senate, where the measure will be reviewed for a second time. It’s unlikely that the Republican-led Senate will approve the bill, but seeing it move forward could mean a noticeably positive impact on the health of people across the country and on the U.S. at a societal level.

“Millions of Americans’ lives have been upended as a result of convictions for possessing small amounts of marijuana, and the racial disparities in conviction rates for those offenses are as shocking as they are unjust,” said House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer in a statement after the vote, according to CNN. “That’s why we passed the Marijuana Opportunity Reinvestment and Expungement (MORE) Act today.”

The bill would importantly help those who have been convicted in the past of non-violent marijuana offenses.

The MORE Act aims to remove cannabis from the Controlled Substances Act, which would finally allow states to regulate it as they see fit, which many states are already doing.

Perhaps most importantly, it would also expunge past convictions for marijuana possession and require resentencing for those in prison for pot convictions. The bill also authorizes a federal tax on marijuana sales that would begin at 5 percent, funds which advocates say would be used to reinvest in communities that have suffered from the war on drugs.

The bill would also ban government agencies from using marijuana as a reason to deny people federally subsidized housing or to adversely impact their immigration status.

American’s opinions on marijuana use has changed dramatically in a short time and federal law needs to catch up.

Credit: David McNew/Getty Images

Less than a decade ago, recreational marijuana was illegal in all 50 states. Now, as of December 2020, 15 states allow recreational use of marijuana (with Arizona, Montana, New Jersey, and South Dakota voting to allow it in 2020) in addition to the 38 states that allow medical marijuana.

That’s a rapid shift. And one that the federal government hasn’t kept up with. As voters across the country embrace legal weed, it’s remained completely illegal at the federal level, treated as the same category as cocaine and heroine.

Americans support marijuana legalization by a two-to-one margin, according to polls, numbers that have almost completely flipped in the past two decades. That support includes majorities of Republicans and vast majorities of Democrats and independents.

“We’re not rushing to legalize marijuana. The American people have already done that. We’re here because Congress has failed to deal with a disastrous war on drugs and do its part for the over 15 million marijuana users in every one of your districts,” said Rep. Earl Blumenauer, an Oregon Democrat and one of the bill’s chief architects, during House floor debate Friday morning before the vote. “It’s time for Congress to step up and do its part. We need to catch up with the rest of the American people.”

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

TikTok Suspended A Mexican Politician For Celebrating The Pass Of A Marijuana Bill By Toking

Fierce

TikTok Suspended A Mexican Politician For Celebrating The Pass Of A Marijuana Bill By Toking

Wolfgang Kaehler / Getty

TikTok but don’t toke.

Nayeli Salvatori, a Mexican congresswoman who is a representative for the 10th district of the state of Puebla, recently got into hot water with TikTok after she posted a video of herself smoking marijuana. The politician, who is also a member of the Social Encounter Party, uploaded her video with the song “Light my Fire” by The Doors and added text to her video which read, “ya es legal” (it is legal) and “Felicidades” (congratulations). She uploaded the video to celebrate Mexico’s Senate vote to decriminalize marijuana. 

TikTok disabled Salvatori’s account citing a violation of its guidelines.

The TikTok’s community guideline that was violated was one that prohibits users from sharing ‘content that displays drugs, drug consumption, or encourages others to make, use, or trade drugs or other controlled substances.’

After her account was suspended for violating TikTok’s community guidelines, Salvatori went to Twitter to upload the video from TikTok. The video remains there and is now being used to discuss the controversy. 

“It’s been more than a year that the theme of legalization of cannabis has been in talks in Congress, of course, it is a celebration!!! It’s obvious that it will be approved!!! Relax, smoke didn’t come out of the pipe because it didn’t have anything, but I love when my tweets are under fire!” read the tweet which was posted in Spanish. 

Salvatori has since shared her new TikTok account with users online, while she waits to be given access to her old one.

Last Thursday, Mexico’s Senate approved the measure with a vote of 82 to 18 to pave the way to legalize recreational marijuana use.

The bill is not officially law yet, as it originated in the Senate and must go to vote to the House of Representatives. If approved with changes it will go back to the Senate and become official if voted in favor of. 

The bill was opposed by some senators who were worried about children and teenage consumption, but the bill does include that individuals must be over 18 to consume marijuana. 

The measure would allow an individual of legal age to possess up to 28 grams of cannabis and grow up to six plants at home. If there are two people who consume marijuana in the same residence, then they will be allowed to grow up to 8 plants in their home. 

With this new law, drug cartels behind much of the violence in Mexico could be stripped of their control over the marijuana market. 

The lower house is expected to vote on the measure before December 15.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com