Culture

Avocado Bar Opens In Brooklyn Then Runs Out Of Avocados In Three Hours

A new restaurant opened in Brooklyn this week that promises to serve a menu almost entirely comprised of avocado-infused dishes.

Credit: Alex G May / Youtube

Even Becky is on the Avocado train.

On Monday, the Avocaderia opened up in Brooklyn. It’s a restaurant opened by three friends from Italy who tasted avocados in Mexico and knew what they had to do.

A post shared by Avocaderia (@avocaderia) on

Francesco Brachetti, one of the three friends, was interviewed by the New York Times and said “They’re tasty and healthy, and I ate them every day,” when discussing his discovery of avocados on his trip to Mexico.

Guys from Italy went to Mexico, discovered exotic fruits, and decided to cash in? Sounds very familiar. Even the dude on the left is like, “Um, hey guys, is this a good idea?”

The Avocaderia is located in “Industry City,” which is neither a city, nor is it itself an industry.

Credit: Industry City

It’s some sort of collective for hipsters to go and drink exclusive free-range, fair-trade, vegan, gluten-free, top-knot, flannel, macchiatos, or whatever.


Some natives of the area, myself included, think Brooklyn has had enough trendiness.

Industry City is the real world embodiment of “SoDoSoPa” (“South of Downtown South Park”) from “The City Part Of Town.”

Credit: Comedy Central

This South Park episode focuses on gentrification. In it, the locals build an entire downtown area where there wasn’t one, displacing and inconveniencing the poor people in the area, to attract the alien overlords of Whole Foods to open a location in the area.


What happened to the Brooklyn I knew? Am I just out of touch? Old fashioned?

Credit: andrewsantiago1 / imgur / Lion King / ABC Disney

Am I just nostalgia-ridden for a time when Industry City was just another unwalkable part of Sunset Park? An area me and the homies enjoyed having as a scary area you just don’t go to, unless you were looking for a scary area to go to?


Man, I have severely digressed in this article. Um. Avocados. Right. Anyway, the food looks delicious as fuck.

A post shared by Avocaderia (@avocaderia) on

Now, the real question is how do I hold this? Do I need white privilege, or can I just use my hands?


According to reports, on its first day, the new restaurant ran out of ripe avocados, their main ingredient, within three hours. The fruit is notorious for its ripening pattern.

Apparently, they didn’t run out of avocados, they had plenty of those, they just weren’t ripe. Sounds like they were a bit unprepared. They discovered avocados like yesterday, so you can almost forgive them for not knowing. Almost.


READ: Demand For Avocados Is So Strong That Mexican Farmers Are Cutting Down Forests To Keep Up


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These Brooklynite Afro-Dominican Twins Are Unapologetically Reclaiming Brujería

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These Brooklynite Afro-Dominican Twins Are Unapologetically Reclaiming Brujería

Brujería is practically second nature to Ph.D ‘Social Science Brujas‘ and yoginis, Dr. Griselda Rodriguez-Solomon and Dr. Miguelina Rodriguez. For the Afro-Dominican twins raised in Bushwick, Brooklyn in the ’80s, their spirituality emerged in their youth.

The twins were raised Catholic and watched their faith parallel the private rituals their mother practiced. Surrounded by altars and religious objects common of the 21 Divisions or Dominican Vudu, brujería seemed normal.

Yet, in the public eye openly claiming such practices were shunned.

“Unfortunately, that mystery is not because the practice itself is mysterious and dark; it’s because main society and religion has made it so that we have this fear of brujas, brujería, and santería,” Miguelina told Refinery29.

Known as the Brujas of Brooklyn, the twins sought to create a space dedicated to the solace of women of African descent further dismantling the harmful ties once associated with brujería.

Launched in 2016, Griselda and Miguelina work to normalize ancestral practices and heal generational trauma.

As scholars and professors at the City University of New York, they tackle conversations around gender, religion, race, and anti-blackness in the community through meditation.

“With Brujas of Brooklyn (like so many other platforms), we really create a space for Latinx people to explore what it means to be Latinx, and to understand that who we are doesn’t exist in a box,” Griselda told Bustle.

Syncretic traditions and rituals descendant from the Yoruba faith are a source of resilient strength in the face of historical brutality within the Latin American diaspora. Out of the 11.2 million Africans that survived the transatlantic slave trade, only 450,000 arrived in the United States. The rest were dispersed in the Caribbean, Central and South America.

Resistant to the cultural erasure, these spiritual practices have remained and expanded within the diaspora. Now a resurgence is evident.

Thanks to social media, spirituality and witchcraft have grown among millennials. Formerly, private practices have become mainstream as today’s brujas are working to unravel folk myths that have led to the miseducation of many.

You see them everywhere through astrologers, tarot readers, and holistic healers.

Brujas live their lives unapologetically and the twins are no exception.

Spirituality in Latin America is complex. Demonized by Christianity, the fear of brujería is also rooted in sexism.

“The word bruja for me, it’s very political… it has been demonized for so many years. And a lot of it, we’re starting to understand, is because women are inherently powerful people,” said Miguelina to Refinery29. “I think that when a woman taps into that power, she becomes so powerful, and the patriarchy is scared of that.”

In order to reclaim a practice, one must first decolonize the mind and spirit as well as empower the women that paved the way for witchcraft.

“The people that were considered witches in Western Europe, Africa, or Latin America, were curanderas, herbalists, midwives, doulas, astrologers. There are generations of women whose powers couldn’t manifest because those in power were afraid of us,” said Griselda for Bustle.

Like those that came before them, the twins are ‘womb-healers,’ aimed to heal the inherited intergenerational trauma, which disproportionately affects Black women.

In the United States, Black women historically have the highest maternal mortality rates. Due to health conditions and institutional racism within the healthcare system, in 2018 Black women were 2.5 times more likely to die from pregnancy-related complications.

Practicing Yoni, an ancient Sanskrit word for ‘vulva’, they tap perform an act called “woke womb work” in retreats and workshops. They also involve Kundalini yoga in their craft which involves chanting, breathing exercises, and poses meant to activate Shakti; spiritual energy located in the spine.

Both containing origins in Hinduism, the practice is tied to divine feminine energy.

With workshops serving up to 100 people, now virtually during the pandemic, the Brujas of Brooklyn having taken their practices to the public sphere. As they continue to work to revive a legacy robbed from them, in part due to anti-blackness, those that engage are discovering inner magic they never knew they had.

“Women have been reclaiming this word for generations,” Griselda shared to Bustle. “But we’re seeing it a lot more today because of social media, thank God. What better ancestor to reclaim than the witches who took no sh*t 700 years ago. We’re living through her in a new way.”

Read: More Mothers Are Hiring Doulas, But What Is A Doula? Here’s What You Need To Know

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e.l.f. Cosmetics Is Literally Releasing a Chipotle-Themed Eyeshadow Palette

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e.l.f. Cosmetics Is Literally Releasing a Chipotle-Themed Eyeshadow Palette

Photo via e.l.f.

We’ve seen our fair share of weird brand collabs in the past, but this is truly one we didn’t see coming.

On Thursday, Chipotle and e.l.f. Cosmetics announced that they were teaming up for a collaboration.

Both makeup-lovers and Chipotle-lovers can have fun with the team-up. According to the press release, e.l.f will be selling Chipotle-themed makeup and Chipotle will be selling makeup-themed food. Confused? Keep reading.

On March 9th, e.l.f. cosmetics is launching their e.l.f. x Chipotle makeup collection, a range of products that includes a Chipotle-themed eyeshadow palette, a tinted lip-gloss, an avocado-shaped beauty sponge, and a makeup bag that looks exactly like Chipotle’s famous to-go bags.

Photo via e.l.f. Cosmetics

The eyeshadow palette is made up of 12 shades, each of which are named after one of Chipotle’s signature ingredients. For example, the leaf-green shade is called “Lettuce”, the buttery gold shade is called “Corn Salsa”…you get the picture. The “Make It Hot” lip gloss is a sheer, hot-pink shade that is formulated with Vitamin E and coconut oil.

And as an added bonus, when you purchase the Chipotle eyeshadow palette, you’ll be emailed a voucher for free Chipotle chips and guac.

But makeup isn’t the only aspect of the promotion. Chipotle, too, will be offering a limited-time option. The fast-casual restaurant will be selling an entrée called “Eyes. Chips. Face. Bowl.” And in honor of e.l.f. Cosmetics’ vegan and cruelty free products, the menu item will be vegan.

The bowl will consist of white rice, pinto beans, hot salsa, corn salsa, guac, lettuce, and a side of chips. But it won’t be available forever! You’ll only be able to find it in the “Featured” section of Chipotle’s website or app from March 10 through March 17.

If you’re surprised by this collab, you’re not the only one. After all, “Mexican food” isn’t the first thing that comes to mind when you think of makeup.

But e.l.f. and Chipotle seem to think that they’re a match made in heaven. After all, this is the second time the two popular brands have joined forces.

“We’re always looking for opportunities to lead culture and make authentic connections with Gen-Z alongside brands that share similar values,” said Chipotle’s VP of digital marketing, Tressie Lieberman.

And e.l.f.’s CMO was equally effusive. “There is nothing tastier or prettier than the combination of burritos and makeup!” said Kory Marchisotto, in a statement. “We have long admired Chipotle and we are thrilled to come together to do things that neither one of us have done before. We share the same renegade spirit and are both committed to bringing the best ingredients to our consumers at extraordinary prices.”

e.l.f.s Chipotle collection launches on March 9th, and the line’s prices range from $8 to $18. Get notified on the launch by going over to e.l.f.’s site. Head to Chipotle’s app or website after March 10th to order their exclusive “Eyes. Chips. Face. Bowl.” entrée.

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