Culture

There Is A Debate On Twitter Over The New York Times’ Broccoli And Potato Taco Topped With A Fried Egg

It’s pretty hard to mess up a good taco. Yet the New York Time’s latest recipe does just that. Roasted broccoli and potato tacos with fried eggs anyone? Didn’t think so. The recipe post was met with criticism online from people questioning everything from the use of broccoli on tacos to the time it takes to put the meal together. Here are some of the best reactions from this taco monstrosity.

Here is the latest recipe from The New York Times that has saddened Twitter users.

There is nothing wrong with changing things up. However, some times you just shouldn’t mess around with good, strong classic dish. Tacos, while super diverse when it comes to fillings, is something that fans think can be taken too far. The New York Times is learning that with their broccoli and potato taco recipe.

First and foremost having broccoli on a taco is a definite no-no.

Credit: @NerdyLadd / Twitter

One of the best parts about tacos is the creative toppings you can place on top of them. That doesn’t necessarily mean anything can go on top it, especially broccoli. It’s vegetable that tastes better as a side piece to your meal, not on top of it.

The recipe got people riled up and rightfully so.

Credit: @AnthonyBialy / Twitter

There’s always room for new takes on classic food and that’s fine. But when you mess with something as great and beloved as tacos, it better be good. In this case, the recipe was a flop and people let the NY Times know.

Besides the recipe, who wants to wait 45 minutes to make taco?

Credit: @artnewgeek / Twitter

Tacos are a go-to food because of how and easy they are to put together. But 45 minutes? Many have taken to social media to voice their grievance about the time it takes to put these together.

One user said, “45 minutes for tacos? Unless 30 of those are kneading and rolling the dough for your own tortillas.”

Just because you put something on a tortilla doesn’t qualify it as a taco.

Credit: @DiegoBernalTX / Twitter

Let’s also point out that having broccoli, potatoes, avocados and an egg on a tortilla would make the whole thing tear right through. It just doesn’t make any sense, let alone calling it a “taco” is another insult.

Can you imagine what our abuelas would say if we served this at dinner?

Credit: @GoAskAlice67 / Twitter

If you want to anger our abuelas this might be the dish to go with. They’ve taught you better and showing up to dinner with these will surely leave at the receiving end of a pow-pow.

People were quick to point out this isn’t the first time the New York Times has tried gentrifying a Latino dish.

Credit: @nytimes / Twitter

Who remembers guacamole with peas? Of course you don’t because I don’t think anyone would ever dare putting peas in the guacamole. Yet time and time again the New York Times tries reintroducing these Latin dishes with their own take and fails.

There’s really nothing worse than someone’s take on a classic dish and manages to ruin it all together. Stick to what you know.

So if we can’t call these tacos, what are they? I think this takes the cake.

Credit: @Emmerbetic / Twitter

This Twitter user might have nailed it right on the head with this one. Say hello to “tostadas gringadas”. A creation straight from the kitchen of one gentrifying New Yorker who managed to ruin tacos and scar our tortilla loving hearts.

The whole thing has brought people to tears so The New York Times should learn how to make tacos everyone can enjoy.

These tears are very real. People would love to see cool and interesting tacos but these are just physically impossible. Like, how does one really eat a taco this packed?

READ: Food And Wine Learned A Valuable Lesson About Respecting The Cultures Of Foods They Are Covering After This Concha Fiasco

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Twitter’s AIs Prefer Ted Cruz With Boobs And White Skin Over Black

Things That Matter

Twitter’s AIs Prefer Ted Cruz With Boobs And White Skin Over Black

Ever notice how on some social platforms like Twitter or Instagram that you yourself are mysteriously unable to crop your display images on your own? That’s because Twitter prefers to let their algorithms make the decision. Over the weekend users on Twitter discovered the surprising dangers of letting algorithms crop your own images.

Education tech researcher Colin Madland drew attention to the issue while speaking out about how the video-calling program Zoom, often crops the head out of his black person coworker while on calls.

It didn’t take long for Madland and other users to discover that Twitter’s AIs use discriminatory equations to prioritize certain faces as well. In short, the social platform’s AIs prefer white faces over Black ones.

In response to the discoveries, a Twitter spokesperson acknowledged that the company was looking into the issue “Our team did test for bias before shipping the model and did not find evidence of racial or gender bias in our testing. But it’s clear from these examples that we’ve got more analysis to do. We’re looking into this and will continue to share what we learn and what actions we take,” they stated.

Of course, Madland’s discovery is nothing new. In 2019, test results from the National Institute of Standards and Technology revealed that some of the strongest algorithms online were much more likely to confuse the faces of Black women than those of white women, or Black or white men. “The NIST test challenged algorithms to verify that two photos showed the same face, similar to how a border agent would check passports,” Wired points out. “At sensitivity settings where Idemia’s algorithms falsely matched different white women’s faces at a rate of one in 10,000, it falsely matched black women’s faces about once in 1,000—10 times more frequently. A one in 10,000 false match rate is often used to evaluate facial recognition systems.”

Still, it didn’t take long for users on the platform to ask what other physical preferences Twitter has.

Turns out the AIs prefer Ted Cruz with large anime breasts over a normal-looking Ted Cruz.

(To better understand this Tweet, click the link above)

The user who tested the image of Cruz, found that Twitter’s algorithm on the back end selected what part of the picture it would showcase in the preview and ultimately chose both images of Cruz with a large anime chest.

It’s nothing new that Twitter has its massive problems.

For a platform that so controls and oversees so much of what we consume and how we now operate, it’s scary to know how Twitter chooses to display people with different skin tones. The round of jokes and Twitter experiments by users has only revived concerns on how “learning” computer algorithms fuel real-world biases like racism and sexism.

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You Can Order A ‘Taco Vacuna’ And ‘La Cura’ At This Covid 19-Themed Taqueria

Culture

You Can Order A ‘Taco Vacuna’ And ‘La Cura’ At This Covid 19-Themed Taqueria

Tacovid: SaborViral / Facebook

Pandemia. Brote. Vacuna. La Peste. Although you may find these terms in a glossary about the Covid-19 outbreak, that’s not what these words actually refer to. Instead, they’re options on the menu at a Mexican taqueria called “Tacovid: Sabor Viral”, a perhaps surprisingly very successful Coronavirus-themed restaurant.

Although to many having a Covid-themed taqueria may seem morbid or disrespectful or perhaps gross – I mean who wants to order a plague taco? – the taqueria is making light of a very serious situation with humor. Something that several other businesses have done since the pandemic began.

”Tacovid: Sabor Viral” is the Mexican taqueria going viral – pun intended – for its Covid-themed menu.

Ok…virus-themed tacos don’t exactly sound appetizing. Especially, as we’re still in the midst of a very real pandemic. But one 23-year-old man in the Mexican city of León, who was forced to close down his dance studio because of Coronavirus, is counting on a Covid-themed restaurant – and so far he’s been surprised by its success.

Brandon Velázquez converted his dance academy into a taquería at the end of July, and given that Mexico and the rest of the world was – and is – in the midst of the Covid-19 pandemic decided to call it Tacovid Sabor Viral.

“I had to close my dance academy during the pandemic [but] then an opportunity arose to return to the same place, however, people still did not go out for fear of getting infected.” he told the newspaper El Universal.

“I had always wanted to open a taqueria and, at the end of July, the opportunity to do so occurred. It was how I took advantage of the moment to create this business with a coronavirus theme,” he added.

Items on the menu are named after – you guessed it – the Coronavirus and don’t sound like anything you’d willfully choose to order.

The young entrepreneur detailed the name of each dish, taking full advantage of the Coronavirus theme.

“We have around 12 different dishes, among them are the ‘Tacovid’; we have ‘Forty’, ‘Quesanitizing’, ‘Pandemic’, ‘Outbreak’, and many others. The price varies depending on the dish you order,” he told El Universal.

In addition to themed dishes, the servers also fit the Coronavirus-theme.

When the pandemic hit Mexico, the government urged Mexicans to observe “su sana distancia” and the now common mascot – Susana Distancia – was born.

“In the restaurant, a waitress dressed as a nurse with the name of ‘Susana’ takes orders and works the tables, referring to the healthy distance campaign that was implemented as a precautionary measure,” he says.

To his surprise – and honestly mine as well – the taqueria has been very successful.

Brandon told El Universal that he’s been pleasantly surprised by the support he has received from customers. “I’m surprised because we have had really good sales, despite the circumstances, we have had a lot of support by the community and we’ve already expanded to have two locations.”

“Customers are funny about the theme we are using in the business, and they are delighted with the dishes we are offering. They enjoy it and have a good time,” added Brandon.

Things are looking so good for Brandon and his Covid-themed taqueria, that he’s looking to expand the food business and add new dishes to the menu. “There is always the idea of new names for other dishes that we want to include in the menu.”

Brandon also said that he’s looking to build out a business model so the restaurant could expand to other parts of the country as a franchise.

Apparently, people are really into Covid-themed foods, as this isn’t the first place that a shop as cashed in on the pandemic. Back in April, a panadería was selling out of Covid-themed baked goods so quickly, they couldn’t keep the shelves stocked.

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