food & drink

These Restaurants Are Serving Up Some Of The Best Mexican Food From The West Coast To The East Coast

On the Grid : City

Let’s face it: Mexican food is as American as apple pie. So for this list, we’re touring these United States to find the best places to go. We’ll go to five of the top culinary cities: New York, Austin, Chicago, San Francisco and Los Angeles, and we won’t stop until we’ve had every taco, every relleno, every….husk meringue?

1. Cosme – 35 E 21st St, New York, NY 10010

Source: Cosme, ‘cause you might as well start on the high end. New York Times. Feb 2, 2015.

We’re starting off the list in NYC and we’re going big. Cosme came on the scene with major fanfare, an NYTimes review…and it’s worth it. The only place on this list where you can find husk meringue with corn mousse.

2. Casa Enrique – 5-48 49th Ave, Long Island City, NY 11101

Source: Not your standard tacos at Casa Enrique. Sometimes I Crave. Oct 4, 2012.


Delicious Mexican/pan-Latin cuisine at this popular spot just off the subway in Long Island City (that’s in Queens if you’re not in the know). Try the rojas con crema as an appetizer.

3. El Atroradero – 708 Washington Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11238

Source: Frijoles, arroz, and…something tasty. New York Magazine.


This Brooklyn outpost of the Bronx staple brought in a machine from southern mexico to make their tortillas. So, you should start making your way there now.

4. Tacombi Cafe El Presidente – 30 W 24th St, New York, NY 10010

Source: Choices choices choices. Digital Image. Time Out NY.


You could spend all day here. No, really. In the morning, it’s a coffee and juice bar. It’s also a restaurant (obvs) and tortilleria. So, spend all day and then take some home.

5. Los Mariscos – 409 W 15th St, New York, NY 10011

Source: Mariscos means seafood, for the uninitiated. Digital Image. Eater New York. Oct. 5, 2016.


Tourists have found Los Mariscos at Chelsea Market, but so what? They found Cronuts, too, and those are still darn good. Wait in line on a hot day, have some ceviche and chill.

6. El Naranjo – 85 Rainey St, Austin, TX 78701

Source: No drooling on the guac at El Naranjo. Digital Image. Pen & Fork. March 20, 2011.


Our culinary journey now takes us south to Austin, TX, land of — OMG look at that guacamole. Is that shredded cheese on top? And those chips!

7. Sazón – 1816 S Lamar Blvd, Austin, TX 78704

Source: Sazón. Digital Image. Thrillist.


Not just tacos and burritos at Sazón. A blend of culinary styles from underappreciated areas of Mexico, should you care to try.

8. El Burro – 1105 S Lamar Blvd Unit B, Austin, TX 78704

Source: Cleanliness is next to tastiness at El Burro. Digital Image. Eater Austin. Dec 7, 2016.


Did Austin need another Mexican restaurant? Did Austin need another bar? On this list, anyway, the answer is always…of course!

9. Fonda San Miguel – 2330 W N Loop Blvd, Austin, TX 78756

Source: A giant chile relleno graces the list for the first time. Digital Image. Fonda San Miguel.


Upscale for down-home Austin, Fonda San Miguel’s dishes are as pretty as they are tasty. Either way, that’s saying something.

10. Habanero – 501 W Oltorf St, Austin, TX 78704

Source: Not our fault if you bite your screen. Digital Image. Habanero Cafe.


You’re looking at the best Mexican comfort food Austin has to offer. And what’ve you got against comfort?

Read: 24 Times That Prove Latinos Just Don’t Do Basic Snacks

11. Carnitas Uruapan – 1725 W 18th St, Chicago, IL 60608

Source: We’d like you to “meat” the Chicago portion of the list. Digital Image. Vice. Oct. *, 2017.


If you didn’t look at all that meat and think, “We must be at Chicago,” you’ve clearly never been there. A pity. The slow-cooked pork is so much the house specialty at this legendary Pilsen spot that they put it in the name.

If you love Salsa, this Quiz is just for you!

12. Topolobampo – 445 N Clark St, Chicago, IL 60610

Source: Topolo–whatever, that looks good. Digital image. Serious Eats. March 8, 2013.


Pictured here is the chilaquiles verde, a house speciality at Rick Bayless’s sequel to the ever-popular Frontera Grill. Tortilla chips with an egg on top? Sure.

Read: These 21 Ways Of Enjoying Sopa De Fideo Are Delicious, Surprising, And Very Different

13. La Chaparrita – 2500 S Whipple St, Chicago, IL 60623

Source: Maybe eat them one at a time. Digital image. Chicago Tribune. May 11, 2016.


Remember how we’re in Chicago? Well La Chaparrita specializes in meats, serving up almost 12 different kinds. And they make their own sausage. Chicago, remember, Chicago.

14. Mi Tocaya Antojería – 2800 W Logan Blvd, Chicago, IL 60647, Chicago, IL 60647

Source: Anything that circular has to be delicious. Digital image. Undated.


Just look at those colors! A sunny spot modeled after Mexican street food vendors, this place has found a strong following in the Chi.

Read: Here Are The Best Taquerias California And Texas Have To Offer

15. Cemitas Puebla – 817 W Fulton Market, Chicago, IL 60647

Source: Learn the ways of the Cemita. Digital Image. Chicago Tribune. Sep 28, 2017.


For the uninitiated, a Cemita is a type of sandwich which originated in the southern Mexican state of Puebla. It’s tastiness should be evident in the photo above, so why not make your way to Fulton Market and pick one up.

Read: 19 Dessert Tacos That Will Make Your Mouth Water

16. Cala – 149 Fell St, San Francisco, CA 94102

Source: Cala, one of SF’s finest. Digital Image. Focus Snap Eat.


A more experimental, modern take on Mexican cuisine. Different, but delicious. Is it comfort food you seek? Keep reading!

Read: 19 Ways To Make A Taco Without A Corn Tortilla

17. Nopalito – 306 Broderick St San Francisco, CA 94117

Source: Nopalito means nachos. Digital Image. Esquire.com Oct 11, 2009.

Just look at those chips, just look at them! Nopalito started serving what chefs serve for their staff and never looked back.

Read: 20 Destinations In Latin America Anthony Bourdain Visited In Order To Celebrate Culture And Cuisine

18. Mamacita – 2317 Chestnut St, San Francisco, CA 94123

Source: Mamacita, what you’ll be saying when the food arrives. Digital Image. Thrillist.


Tequila and tacos are treated equally at this stalwart SF eatery. Try both, but not at the same, you beast.

19. La Taqueria – 2889 Mission St, San Francisco, CA 94110

Source: La Taqueria, where big data met a big burrito. Digital Image. Sep 10, 2014.


La Taqueria bears the distinction of winning statistics site FiveThirthyEight’s inaugural burrito tournament. That’s it, folks, data does not lie: Best Burrito.

20. Tres Agaves – 130 Townsend St, San Francisco, CA 94107

Source: Tres Agaves, bumpin’ despite a Giants loss. Digital Image. SFGate.com


Great eats at this neighborhood favorite, near AT&T Park. And a rooftop bar too, where you can drown your sorrows after the Giants lose to the Dodgers again.

21. Guisados – 1261 Sunset Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90026

Source: Guisados is as good as you keep hearing. Digital Image. Serious Eats.


Best tortillas on the list. We know because we have tried them all. Speaking of trying, when you go to Guisado’s, try the mushroom tacos, the quesadilla and the agua fresca.

22. BS Taqueria – 514 7th St, Los Angeles, CA 90014

Source: BS Taqueria, where the wild rumpus starts nightly at 7:05 sharp. Digital Image. Eater LA.


The dining room looks like something out of Where the Wild Things Are, and that’s a good thing. Like it’s big brother restaurant, Broken Spanish, this taco-focused outpost keep things hot.

23. Coni’Seafood – 3544 W. Imperial Highway, Inglewood, CA 90303

Source: Coni’Seafood doing what they do best. Digital Image. LA WEEKLY.


Flight into LAX. Quick Uber to Coni’Seafood in Inglewood. Ceviche. Then we discuss plans.

24. Taco Miendo – 11462 Gateway Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90064

Source: Taco Miendo like a boss. Digital Image. The Daily Meal.


You could do way worse than an asada taco or two from this mini-chain on LA’s west side. LA is a taco town, so even the dives are top notch.

25. Mexicali Taco & Co. – 702 N Figueroa St, Los Angeles, CA 90012

Source: Mexicali Taco Digital Image. Bun Boy Eats LA. August 23, 2012.

This place used to be a stand in parking lot. They’ve come a long way, with a brick-and-mortar wedged into a little strip between Echo Park, Chinatown and Downtown. Get a vampiro and thank us in your minds.

Victoria Cruz Sees Hope For The Future Of LGBTQ+ Rights 50 Years After She Witnessed The Stonewall Riots

Things That Matter

Victoria Cruz Sees Hope For The Future Of LGBTQ+ Rights 50 Years After She Witnessed The Stonewall Riots

iamsamkirk / Instagram

The history of Gay Rights in the country date back to the late ’60s and the epicenter was Manhattan. The core fighters of the LGBTQ community include Marsha P. Johnson, Scott G. Brown, Sylvia Rivera, and a slew of other pioneers. The sad thing is this generation has passed or will very soon, which is why we have to honor their legacy while they’re still alive. One of those people is an inspiring person in our Latinx community.

Victoria Cruz, who is in her 70s, is a survivor of the Stonewall Riots and is still very much a part of the fight for LGBTQ rights.

Instagram/@marinadelbey

Cruz, who was born in Puerto Rico, is one of 11 children that grew up in New York. While Cruz was born a male, she knew since she was in high school that she was a woman. Back in the ’60s, that was no easy thing to admit, yet her Puerto Rican family supported her transition.

While her family and close community were supportive, Cruz faced immense hardships including harassment from the police, and later in the ’90s, she was assaulted.

Instagram/@hispanic_history_

Four of her coworkers physically assaulted her, which left her in ruins.

“I was very angry. Very angry,” Cruz said in an interview with Vanity Fair in 2017. “The worst part of it is that I couldn’t feel the ground beneath me, and added that she was “was contemplating suicide,” at the time.

But she overcame that tough time and is recognized as a leader in the movement for Gay Rights.

Yet, despite the hate and violence she faced, Cruz pushed on standing up for her LGBTQ+ family.

“I used to go to St. Vincent’s on my lunch hour…and I would see her,” Cruz told The Advocate. “She called to me, ‘Victoria, come here.’ And she always called me Dickie, you know, so when she said, ‘Victoria come here,’ I knew that she meant business. I sat down, and she looked at me. She said, ‘Try to keep the community together because we are our own worst enemy. And there’s power in numbers.’ And then she said, ‘The world will come up to try to divide us, and when you divide a community, you conquer it. So try to keep the community together.’”

As a trans woman and pioneer of the LGBTQ movement, Cruz said positive change is happening right now.

Instagram/@florentinoreyes

“I’m optimistic, and I’m hopeful that it will change for the better,” she told The Advocate. “There’s power in numbers. If we unite and keep united, we can make the future different, and what we want it to be. By galvanizing one another, we galvanize each other. And with the same frame of mind, the same frame of thought, we can change what’s happening.”

Trans rights are the new frontier in the LGBTQ+ movement. Despite the contributions made to the movement by trans women of color, cis members of the LGBTQ+ community ignore their plight or add to the harassment.

“There is so much hatred directed toward queer people, particularly transgender women of color. For what? Why? I think it may be about people’s own insecurities about their own identities and sexualities. And further, people don’t know their history,” Cruz told BC/Stories. “The transgender experience isn’t new. It’s as old as the human experience, and anyone who does their research would know this. I think society needs to be educated, and maybe after being educated, empathy will follow.”

READ: Zuri Moreno Made Sure The Trans Community In Montana Remained Safe

Keds Latest Designs Proves That Avoiding Cultural Appropriation In Fashion Is Totally Possible

Culture

Keds Latest Designs Proves That Avoiding Cultural Appropriation In Fashion Is Totally Possible

Keds

It’s always really cool to see a big name brand embrace the art of our Latinidad. It’s like a nod to all of the great Latinx artisans who add beauty and color to our culture. In fact, seeing consumers enthusiastically welcome these goods feels like further validation. With this in mind, it makes this new collaboration all the sweeter for us art and fashion lovers.

Keds is collaborating with designers Thelma Dávila and Lolita Mia on a line inspired by the Latina-created brands.

Instagram / @Keds

In what the shoe company is calling a “collaboration fiesta,” Keds released three fun and vibrant new designs.

Some of the shoes borrow inspiration from Thelma Dávila’s colorful Guatemalan textiles. Alternatively, other pairs utilize Lolita Mia’s festive fringe as embellishments. These touches combine with Keds’ original platform shoes to make a unique product.

Of the partnership with these new brands, Keds’ website says:

“It’s so rewarding to be able to be a part of the professional and personal growth of women who decided to follow their dreams. Entrepreneurs (especially female ones) are always brave, they’re risk-takers that believe strongly in themselves. And we believe in them too. We’re so excited to introduce you to our latest for-women-by-women collaborations.”

The Thelma Dávila brand is named after its Guatemalan founder.

Keds

The company specializes in designing and crafting unique pieces by hand. Furthermore, their products utilize Guatemalan textiles, leathers and non-leather materials. Obviously, this collaboration is built on a solid relationship between the two brands. Since last year, Keds retail locations have carried Thelma Dávila bags and products in stores.

On their website, Keds said the design collaborations were intent on “taking geometric design and color cues from [Dávila’s] native culture, our classic Triple Kick gets transformed into a fiesta-ready standout.”

Founded by jewelry artisan and entrepreneur, Elena Gil, Lolita Mia is a Costa Rican accessory brand.

Keds

While studying abroad in Italy, Gil made a significant personal discovery. She realized that ethnic crafts and traditions were very alike across regions. Specifically, they were similar in cultural importance. In light of this, she decided to start her own brand. Lolita Mia’s handmade products embrace what Gil has coined a “Universal Ethnic Luxury.”

Of the collaboration with Lolita Mia, Keds’ website reads:

“[The] aesthetic shines through in these playful renditions of our platforms in the form of fun, festive fringe and punchy tropical shades.”

The Ked × Lolita Mia collaboration has two designs while the Ked x Thelma Dávila collab is made up of one.

Instagram / @lolitamiacr

“Triple Tassel” is a multicolored platform with purple, pink, orange and white tassels attached to the laces. “Triple Decker Fringe” is an off-white platform slip-on with multi-colored fringe and golden embellishments on top. The “Triple Kick” features a neutral platform with Guatemalan textile accents around the bottom.

Each design is priced at $70 a pair. Moreover, they are available exclusively on Keds’ website. Be sure to order yours today and add a little extra Latinx flare to your summer looks.

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