Culture

These Non-Corn Tortillas For Your Next Taco Tuesday Will Change Everything You Know About Tacos

People have come up with a lot of ways to substitute for corn, whether that be allergies, Paleo or Keto diets, or to pack more veggies and nutrients into your life. That said, we do endorse finding ways to spice up your favorite Mexican dishes for whatever reason! Check out these ways to make taco shells.

1. Plantain Shell Tacos

taco shells
CREDIT: “Grain-free Taco Shells.” Digital Image. Whole New Mom. 23 April 2018.

This is genius and I want to kiss the hands who first made this plantain taco a reality. Just preheat your oven at 300 F while you blend all of this:

  • 3 ripe plantains (you can use green plantains for a lower carb option. See notes in method.)
  • 1/2 cup avocado oil
  • 1 teaspoon freshly-ground garlic sea salt (more if desired)
  • 1/2 teaspoon onion powder
  • Optional: 1 teaspoon (or more) hot sauce (like Cholula)
  • Optional: 1/2 lime squeezed

Then, use an ice cream scoop to scoop the mixture onto a pan and bake for 25 min. Remove and let cool for a min. Put each one back in the oven, but lay them so that the ends fall through the oven rack slots, forming a taco shape. Cook until done and eat!

2. Healthy Zucchini Soft “Taco” Tortilla Shells

CREDIT: “Healthy Zucchini Tortillas Recipe or Zucchini Soft Taco Shells Recipe | @whiteonrice.” Digital Image. White On Rice Couple. 23 April 2018.

Ingredients:

  • 4 cups (950ml) zucchini, coarsely grated
  • 1 large egg
  • 1/2 cup (120ml) grated parmesan cheese
  • 1/4 cup (60ml) bread crumbs
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly grated black pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon kosher or sea salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cumin

Directions:

  1. Pre-heat oven to 450 degrees F.
  2. Remove as much moisture as you can from the zucchini. Add zucchini to large bowl and mix in remainder of the taco shell ingredients (egg, parmesan cheese, bread crumbs, black pepper, salt, garlic powder, and cumin).
  3. Cover baking sheets with parchment paper or oven proof baking mat. Scoop about ¼ cup of mixture and press down on baking pan into a thin circle, about 5” wide. Repeat for remainder of mixture.
  4. Bake shells for about 25 minutes, or until the shells look “crisp’ and brown around the edges. We like to bake the shells a little longer for a more charred texture and flavor. Just be careful to not bake too long or else the shells dry out and are hard to peel off.
  5. After zucchini soft taco shells are cool, gently peel them off the parchment paper.

Adapted from White On Rice Couple.

3. Stuffed Taco Shells

CREDIT: “If you love easy, delicious dinner ideas, these Stuffed Taco Shells are for you! Plus, prep them in advance and freeze the shells for a later meal. Great for new moms too!” Digital Image. Shugary Sweets. 23 April 2018.

If you know how to make Italian Stuffed Shells, and you know how to make tacos, you’ve got this in the bag. Just stuff these shells with picadillo, corn, black beans and top with a lot of shredded cheese. Then, just bake at 350 F for 45 minutes.

Pro tip: Make a ton of these in advance and just freeze in a ziplock bag!

Adapted from Shugary Sweets.

4. Bacon Shells

CREDIT: @amybwall / Pinterest

Alright, you guys. Bake three slices of overlapping bacon until almost cooked. then, slip onto oven rack slots and bake into taco shells until done!

5. Pork Rind Tortillas

CREDIT: “Almost Zero Low Carb Wraps are great as soft tortilla shells or as sandwich wraps | Low Carb, Gluten-free, Primal, Keto, THM.” Digital Image. Low Carb Maven. 23 April 2018.

If you love pork rinds and cheese, these tortillas will blow your mind:

Ingredients:

  • 4 oz. Hot & Spicy Pork Rinds (regular work just fine, too)
  • 1 (eight oz.) package cream cheese, softened
  • 8 eggs
  • 1/3 cup water
  • 1 tablespoon granulated garlic
  • 1 tablespoon ground cumin

Directions:

  1. Blitz pork rinds into a food processor until they are dust.
  2. Add all other ingredients to food processor and blitz for about 45 more seconds. Until you have a nice smooth batter.
  3. Preheat an electric griddle to high. (Using a non-stick pan on the stove top would work also, I would just set the heat to medium-high)
  4. Spray cooking surface with a little spray oil (I use either coconut oil or olive oil spray) and pour 1/3 cup of batter onto griddle.
  5. Gently spread the batter as thin as you can with a rubber spatula and cook for about 2 minutes or until golden brown.
  6. Flip tortilla and continue to cook for about 45 more seconds.
  7. Repeat with the rest of the batter.

Adapted from Primitive Palate.

6. Feel free to make your own take.

CREDIT: Unnamed. Digital Image. Primitive Palate. 23 April 2018.

This blogger stuffed her pork rind tortillas with shredded beef, cilantro, and cheese. I’d like to stuff that into my mouth. 🙂

7. Pancake Tacos

CREDIT: “Pancake Tacos.” Digital Image. Sweet Potato Chronicles. 24 April 2018

I ship this as my new breakfast taco option. Just fold your pancake in half and stuff with nutella and sliced bananas (or plantains) and enjoy that ish!

8. 3-Ingredient Paleo/Vegan Taco Shells

CREDIT: “3-Ingredient Paleo Taco Shells” Digital Image. Rubies and Radishes. 23 April 2018.

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup flaxseed meal (find organic ground flaxseed meal here)
  • 1/8 cup water
  • a pinch of salt

Directions:

  1. Mix together the flaxseed meal, water, and a pinch of salt quickly in the preheated skillet, using a spatula to combine it well, and press it against the skillet for around a minute or so.
  2. Divide, roll out and drape over the oven rack (we suggest two slots), for 8-12 minutes at 350 F.
  3. Then EAT.

Adapted from Rubies and Radishes.

9. Endive Boat Tacos

CREDIT: “Low Carb Turkey Tacos with Endive” Digital Image. All Day I Dream About Food. 23 April 2018.

This one is easy. Just peel off endive leaves and stuff them with turkey picadillo, drizzle with shredded cheese.

Adapted from All Day I Dream About Food.

10. Fried Egg Tacos

CREDIT: “copycat naked egg taco” Digital Image. Extra Crispy. 23 April 2018.

This one you already know. Use a fried egg!

Pro tip: use a pastry ring in the pan to make sure the egg stays in a perfect circle.

11. Cocoa Cookie Taco Shell

CREDIT: “Cocoa Cookie Taco Shell” Digital Image. Rachel Ray. 23 April 2018.

Here’s how to make this magic happen:

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup flour
  • 1/3 cup natural unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 1/8 tsp. salt
  • 6 tbsp. butter, at room temperature
  • 2/3 cup sugar
  • 3 large egg whites
  • 1/4 tsp. pure vanilla extract
  • Chocolate shell topping, fillings and garnishes

Directions:

1. Preheat the oven to 350°. In a small bowl, whisk the flour, cocoa powder and salt. In a medium bowl, beat the butter and sugar, about 2 minutes. Add the egg whites and vanilla; keep beating, occasionally scraping down the bowl, until blended (the mixture may be lumpy). Add the flour mixture; beat to blend.

2. Set up a taco-making station: On a work surface, arrange two boxes (at least 3 inches high) about 12 inches apart. Arrange a 2-to 2 3/4-inch-diameter rolling pin with one end on each of the boxes, leaving space for the rolling pin to have 2 taco shells draped over it. (You can also use two paper towel tubes.) Drape a sheet of parchment paper over the rolling pin.

3. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Cut the paper in half crosswise; place 3 tbsp. dough in the center of each piece of parchment. Using a small offset spatula or the back of a spoon, spread the dough out to a 5-to 5 1/2-inch circle. Bake until the dough is firm, rotating the sheet halfway through, about 10 minutes for a softer taco and 12 minutes for a crispy taco. Let rest 15 seconds.

4. Working with 1 cookie at a time, lift the paper and cookie; gently invert over the rolling pin (leave the paper on). Using a pot holder (the cookie is hot), gently push the sides down to form a taco-shell shape. Let cool completely, about 30 minutes. Peel off the paper. Repeat with the remaining dough for 8 shells. Dip edges in chocolate shell topping; fill and garnish (see our Awesome Ice Cream Tacos).

Adapted from Rachel Ray

12. Chicken Skin Tacos

CREDIT: “Chicken Skin Tacos.” Digital Image. Chef Steps. 23 April 2018.

Here’s how you go from a chicken leg to chicken skin tacos.

  1. Just gently peel the skin off of a chicken thigh and blanch in boiling water for 15 minutes.
  2. Then, cut the chicken skin with a circle cutter.
  3. Get out your taco shell molds and deep fry for 6-10 minutes.
  4. Let cool and stuff!

13. Easy Provolone Cheese Tacos

CREDIT: “Almost Zero Carb Low Carb Wraps are great as soft tortilla shells or as sandwich wraps | Low Carb, Gluten-free, Primal, Keto, THM” Digital Image. Low Carb Maven. 23 April 2018.

Alright, this one is easy af. Just sprinkle spices (garlic, chili powder, your choice!) onto round slices of Provolone cheese. Then bake at 350 F for 10-11 minutes. Then take them out, and let them cool a bit until you can fold them on the oven rack.

14. Cauliflower Tortillas

CREDIT: “Cauliflower Tortillas.” Digital Image. Paleo Leap. 23 April 2018.

This bad boy is Paleo and Keto friendly. All you have to do is steam 1 head of riced cauliflower in boiling water for 5 minutes. Squeeze out all the water and mix with two eggs, oregano and paprika to taste.

Separate into six equal pieces of flour, press and bake for 8 to 10 minutes at 375 F!

Adapted from Paleo Leap. 

15. Carrot Shells

CREDIT: “Super easy 4-ingredients Healthy Taco Shells recipe made from carrots ! Make your own soft shell taco in a minute far better-tasting than store bought taco shells.” Digital Image. Sweet As Honey. 24 April 2018.

Do you have so many carrots you don’t know what to do with them!? These tacos are for you:

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 cup grated carrot , packed + 1/2 cup tap water to cook
  • 1/2 cup grated cheese I used cheddar
  • 2 eggs
  • 3 tablespoon Gluten Free Oat Flour
  • 1/4 teaspoon Salt if desired, optional
  • 1/8 teaspoon pepper if desired, optional

Instructions

  1. Place grated carrots into a bowl and cover with 1/2 cup tap water. Microwave 5 minutes.
  2. Pat the carrots EXTREMELY dry. This is super important. Do what you gotta do.
  3. Place into a bowl and add the grated cheese, eggs, oat flour, salt and pepper. Combine until it forms a sort of batter.
  4. Prepare a baking tray covered with baking paper. Set aside.
  5. Place small portion of the carrot mixture onto the prepared tray. I used a 5 cm mechanical Ice cream scoop maker to measure equal quantity and I split the whole batter into 4 portions.
  6. Press with your finger to compact the carrot onto the tray as a flat circle.
  7. Bake at 390 F for 15 minutes or until crispy on the sides.
  8. Gently remove the carrot tacos from the baking paper by lifting them from the side, using your finger or a tongue.
  9. Eat warm filled with filling of your choice.
  10. If you want to create a taco like shape. Cool down the shells on a bottle . I used small (17 oz) 500 ml bottle of water but any small bottle like beer bottles will work. The carrot taco will harden slightly when cooling down.

Adapted from Sweet As Honey.

16. Butter Lettuce Taco Shells

CREDIT: @reedbendoregon / Instagram

And if you don’t want to make your own homemade tortillas, snag yourself some butter lettuce and you’re good to go! Plus, they’re healthy!

17. Tacos with Jicama Shells

CREDIT: Unnamed. Digital Image. Primal Palate. 23 April 2018.

Jicama is a great sub for corn tortillas. It adds great flavor, is low-carb, and one-ingredient! Pro tip: soak the sliced jicama in cold water for 30 minutes before using.

18. Deli Meat

CREDIT: “Turkey Tacos.” Digital Image. Darling Be Daring. 23 April 2018.

Well, this is for the lazy, and we’re not judging. You can even cram more veggies into your life by making that the main taco stuffing and just wrapping in deli meat, right? Maybe, we don’t know.

19. Siete Cassava & Coconut Tortillas

CREDIT: Siete

If you’re trying to go grain-free, then you can find this at your Whole Foods 365, and they are seriously tasty. Be sure to fry them up first and enjoy the crunch!

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

From Making Sure Your Turkey Actually Fits Into The Oven To Keeping It Moist — Here’s How To Avoid Messing Up Your First Adult Thanksgiving!

Culture

From Making Sure Your Turkey Actually Fits Into The Oven To Keeping It Moist — Here’s How To Avoid Messing Up Your First Adult Thanksgiving!

John Moore / Getty

So you’re stuck in a pandemic without your parents or abuelos to make the turkey and the duties are falling on you. Just about everyone knows that the task of cooking the Thanksgiving turkey is a real job that no one takes on lightly. Whether you’re roasting it or deep frying it, there are legends of just how dangerous and intense prepping a turkey can be.

In fact, according to the U.S. Fire Administration, an estimated 2,000 Thanksgiving Day fires happen every year across the country. Even more so, the National Fire Protection Association has said that deep fryer fires cause an “average of 5 deaths, 60 injuries and more than $15 million in property damage each year.”

To help, we dug around for the best tips on Reddit!

Below check out some recipes on how to avoid a Thanksgiving turkey disaster!

“When I did my first turkey I followed Altons method. Featured here on youtube. It was the best bird I have had, so moist and flavourful. I now have everyone in my family do the same. Low and slow is no way to go with turkey, unless you are bbq´ing it. Brine it for flavour and moist meat. And NO STUFFING the bird, keep it seperate. Just watch the episode, I know it is kinda corny but it is good advice.”- RolandIce

“Get yourself a good probe thermometer. A model like this one works well, you leave it in the bird while it cooks and you can see what’s happening inside. It’s impossible to overcook it this way. Remember to rest it as the temperature will continue to rise even when you pull it out of the oven.” –Hillside_Strangler

“You start with eliminating the fear. People have been cooking large animals and eating them since the invention of fire and they didn’t even have Youtube. You’ll be fine…

  • Thaw the bird. If that takes a few days, okay. If you have to put it in a sink full of warm water the morning of, that’s okay too. It’s meat, not Ebola.*
  • Start early. Nobody’s going to obsess if the mashed potatoes are holding you up. Waiting on the bird is a drag. Don’t put it in the oven at 6am, but figure whatever temperature/time recommendations you’re getting should have an hour or so of slop on either side because they’re always wrong.
  • Stage well. You’ve got vegetables, potatoes, god knows what else that needs to be ready, too. Mashed potatoes that sit out for an hour aren’t nearly as good as mashed potatoes made 5 minutes ago. A turkey that’s been in a warming oven for two hours? Tastes damn near exactly the same as one fresh off roast.
  • Check it every half hour. If it gets too crispy in spots, tent those spots with tin foil. Juice should be basted (in my opinion – I also add white wine. Well, truthfully, I add mead that my wife makes, but you can’t have any). Stick a thermometer down into the meat between the drumstick and where the breast ceases to be a breast. Your oven is probably going to reveal that it doesn’t cook as evenly as it should because nobody bakes any more so most ovens made in the past 10 years are absolute shit. No worries, just rotate the pan 180 degrees in the oven every time you check it.
  • If you don’t want the wingtips to turn into jerky you need to truss them up underneath. I’ll bet there’s a youtube video for that.
  • Let it rest. This is your opportunity to get all the sweet, sweet karma from a beautiful bird. Or, you know, finish cooking everything else. Trust me, your “beautiful bird” is “just another turkey” to everyone else on the Internet so spare us the Instagram please.
  • Carve out of sight. You can do a better job in the kitchen where things are clean, the lighting is good and you don’t have to reach over everyone. This is much easier than you think, too. You need a sharp knife, a fork of some kind, and a cutting board, preferably one with a juice groove. Cut down the breast bone on one side, then under it to free the breast. Poke a knife in the shoulder joint of the wing to get the wing off. Poke your knife in the hip joint and cut the meat to get the leg off. Now cut the thigh from the drumstick at the knee joint (easy) and put a wing, a thigh, and a drumstick on a serving platter. Now cut the breast against the grain into slices about half an inch thick and lay them out. Doesn’t that look beautiful? Doesn’t it dust the shit out of hacking at a carcass in front of your friends and neighbors? And hey – you’ve still got half a turkey.

Once your feast is done, strip the rest of the bird from the bone and put the meat in the fridge. Take the bones and put them in a stock pot with water and whatever spices your mother-in-law insist go in turkey stock (she’ll have an opinion). Let it just-barely-simmer overnight. House will smell awesome the next day and you can make this soup.” –kleinbl00

“I have entries broken down by the hour in my Google calendar to tell me when I need to be chopping stuff, when I need to be putting things in the oven, when people are arriving, what tasks I can hand off to anybody asking, “Is there anything I can do to help?”, etc. If you’ve got a game plan, everything will run a lot smoother. Some general tips for people that might have more time to prepare (these tips are applicable to OP as well, just might have to do test runs on a weeknight instead) – don’t try anything on Thanksgiving day that you haven’t given a shot prior to Thanksgiving day. Have you ever brined anything? Give brining a test run on a chicken this weekend if you have no experience but want to wow people for the holiday. Never tried making a pie crust from scratch? Definitely worth testing that in advance and/or freezing a second batch prior to the holiday shows up. I wouldn’t recommend doing anything new on that Thursday, because it will frazzle you if it doesn’t come out well when people arrive. My final recommendation is do as much possible prep work as possible prior to Thanksgiving day. Chop vegetables in advance, if you can. Line up spices and baking ingredients in an orderly fashion in your pantry or fridge. Mis en place is going to save your ass from wondering where the fuck you put the brown sugar. It also ensures that you have every ingredient necessary before you attempt cooking whatever you’re cooking.” –mattjeast

“Here is the best turkey recipe: Beginning at least 1 hour before dinner, add wine to your guests. Continue to add wine until dinner is over.” –paularbear

“Be sure to buy the bird 2-3 days ahead of time, EVEN IF THE BIRD IS A “FRESH” BIRD. You can bring home a bird that looks ready to go, but the inside is hard as a rock. They call it “hard-chilled,” I call it frozen. If you buy it a couple days before, you won’t get an icy surprise.” –paularbear

“When the bird hits 165, take it out and simply let it rest. Resting a turkey is vital to ensuring that the meat is moist and tender, instead of dry and stringy. I usually rest a turkey for 5 for about an hour, possibly more.” –Willravel

“I was totally in your shoes two Thanksgivings ago. I was holding a dinner for friends who couldn’t make it home for the holidays. We had about 20 odd people show up! I’d never made a turkey before either. A friend suggested that I stick my defrosted (important!!!), and lightly seasoned turkey into an oven bag. While it is baking, it keeps the moisture in, and cooks in its own juices (read: no obsessive basting!). Really easy and foolproof.” – vickasaurusrex

“As long as its not overcooked or dry, you can edit and recover. Make sure your bird can fit your oven, and time your prep to fit your kitchen. 10-15 is a huge amount of food, too much for a single day prep even for a seasoned home cook, get help. List out what can be done a day or 2 ahead. Have enough containers to store every nicely so there is no cross contamination. Have a back up plan.”- deadmantizwalking

“I have always just used a cooking bag, put the turkey breast side down so all the juices flow to the breast meat. I do stuff my bird, b/c I like how it tastes better. I also let it rest after taking it out of the oven before cutting into it, doing so helps the bird retain it’s juices. I don’t get that perfect skin but I don’t mind, b/c I don’t show it off at the table and nobody eats the skin.” –drawdelove

“If you do decide to stuff the bird remember to include the weight of the stuffing when you calculate the number of hours to cook the turkey. Also, when you order the bird or buy the bird make sure she is not frozen on the inside. I’ve had both these things happen to me and we didn’t eat until late haha.” –ladyloowho

“Also, don’t forget the sides! I had a subscription to CooksIllustrated for many years, and their website is great for that kinda stuff. All their recipes are good/great and often they have ‘pre-cook’ tips. For instance, you can make the sauce and other components for your green bean casserole a day or two before, which makes the day-of SO much easier. Timing is always the hardest part, so make yourself a time schedule for the day, working backward from your serving time. Don’t forget to ensure you have time for the turkey to rest. If you cover it in foil, it’ll stay warm/hot for over an hour, so take that into account.” –BloaterPaste

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This Mexican Mom Has Gone Viral On TikTok For Her Recipe Videos Showing You How Easy It Is To Be A Cook

Culture

This Mexican Mom Has Gone Viral On TikTok For Her Recipe Videos Showing You How Easy It Is To Be A Cook

@JennyMartinezzz / TikTok

Look, it’s no secret that cooking isn’t for everyone. It can be tiring, time-consuming, and sometimes downright difficult. Even if we’re learning from our abuelos or tíos, who are passing down a generation’s worth of recipes, the idea of cooking can be intimidating.

But one woman has taken to TikTok to demystify Mexican cooking and she’s making it look super easy in the process. And as someone who’s actually tried out several of her quick TikTok recipe videos, I can tell you, it is as easy as it looks.

Jenny Martinez has quickly become TikTok’s favorite Latina mom.

In her videos on TikTok, Jenny Martinez shares her traditional Mexican recipient with more than 1.5 million followers – and everything from her dad’s famous shrimp cocktail to her easy churros is on the menu.

Martinez got the idea to create recipe videos for TikTok from her daughter, who herself is an avid TikTok user. The duo shot a few short videos and from their things quickly escalated.

“The following morning my phone was blowing up and we couldn’t believe it that one of my videos had gone viral,” Martinez told In The Know.

Although creating video content, especially cooking content, is a lot of work, Martinez sees it as a chance to do what she already loves – to cook. For her, it’s not just about making mouthwatering meals, like conchas con nieve or chuletas abobadasit’s about preserving Mexican culture.

She learned traditional cooking from her mother growing up.

Like so many of us, Martinez grew up learning how to cook with her mother.

“For me, it’s not — it’s not that I’m giving away my secrets,” Martinez told In The Know. “To me, it’s just sharing my knowledge to the younger community so we can continue our culture, the authentic Mexican recipes that our grandmas, our mothers passed down to us.”

Food is one of the greatest bonds between a community. It helps shape traditions, events, ceremonies, and entire cultures. Martinez knows this and believes that food can unite the people within a culture while educating those outside of it. Some of her followers haven’t heard of the ingredients she uses but her explainers in English make such barriers fade away.

“The whole Mexican cooking, it’s just something that connects us together as a community and as Mexicans,” Martinez told In The Know. “Now that I see that in social media that everybody wants to learn and everybody wants to keep on the traditions, that’s what I like. That’s what I want to see.”

The mom’s recipes are great for budding chefs at all levels.

Martinez tells her followers not to get so hung up on trying something new and just attempt to do what you want with the recipe.

“You don’t have to be an expert in cooking. Just open the fridge and start following my recipes. I try to make them as easy as possible,” she said.

But at the heart of it all, Martinez is really passionate about her craft.

“I honestly see the beauty in food and in the cooking,” Martinez told In The Know. “I mean, it’s kind of like an art at the end of the day. When you’re plating it and when you see everything just combining. When you see all of those ingredients, that aroma coming out, to me it’s just beautiful.”

One of her most popular recipe videos are her sandia paletas!

Sure, summer may be over but it’s still forever sandia season in my mind. Especially the version Martinez does on her TikTok. Lathered in chamo y and tajin, you’ll never look at sandia paletas the same.

And you’re not the only one – this video has been viewed more than 1.2 million times!

This is the one that I tried to make and it turned out soooo good.

Carne asada nachos are the ultimate cure for la cruda and every time I was out at bar hoping (pre-Covid obviously), I’d almost always end up at a truck by my house for these guys. But doing them at home is just as easy and mil veces mas delicious!

Martinez teaches you how to make these bomb nachos in less than 30 seconds so it’s worth your investment. The result is everything!

Which recipes are you most excited to try out? Or h

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