Culture

19 Dessert Tacos That Will Make Your Mouth Water

There is nothing more delicious than a savory taco. Except maybe one of these 20 dessert tacos that we recommend eating twice daily for the full effect of it’s mood-lifting powers. We’ll start with breakfast.

1. Waffle Taco

CREDIT: “dessert-tacos” Digital Image. A Subtle Revelry. 25 April 2018.

Literally, just lightly toast a frozen waffle, roll the rim in honey, stuff it with ice cream and sprinkle unicorn dust on top.

2. Ice Cream Tacos With Cinnamon Sugar Wonton Shells

CREDIT: “Ice Cream Tacos With Cinnamon Sugar Wonton Shells.” Digital Image. Alaska from Scratch. 25 April 2018.

This is for you fusion lovers. Literally just bake a bunch of oiled up wonton wrappers for 4-5 min at 400 F. Sprinkle cinnamon sugar mixture once out and stuff with ice cream. Chocolate drizzle is not optional.

Adapted from Alaska from Scratch.

3. Pancake Tacos

CREDIT: “Pancake Tacos.” Digital Image. Sweet Potato Chronicles. 24 April 2018

Hiii, go find your mom’s Bisquick and make yourself some pancakes. Then fold and stuff with nutella and sliced fruit. Call yourself a chef. You welcome.

4. Vegan Cinnamon Apple Tacos

CREDIT: “DSC_0333” Digital Image. Eat Drink Shrink. 25 April 2018.

You know how to fry a taco. Do that, then sprinkle with cinnamon and sugar. For the filling:

Peel and dice apples. Toss with lemon juice. Over medium heat stir together butter, chopped apples, cinnamon and coconut sugar. Add about ¼ cup water and let cook on medium heat for about 4 minutes. Stir 1 teaspoon cornstarch into remaining water and add to pan. Continue cooking until most of the liquid removed and apples are soft.

Adapted from Eat Drink Shrink.

5. Cookie Tacos

CREDIT: “Taco Cookies 5444 copy” Digital Image. Erica Sweet Tooth. 25 April 2018.

OK, this is kinda cute. Use golden Oreos broken in half for the taco shells. Chocolate Oreo shell crumbles for “taco meat”, shredded coconut for “iceberg lettuce”, hot tamale candies for “cherry tomatoes” and chopped starburst for “shredded cheese.”

Use some vanilla frosting and melted peanut butter chips for glue and you can figure out the rest. 😉

Adapted from Erica Sweet Tooth.

6. Next Level Choco-Tacos

CREDIT: “Choco Tacos from Food52” Digital Image. Food 52. 25 April 2018.

Remember how drool-worth Choco Tacos from the ice cream truck as a kid? Food 52 has you covered to make these from scratch. Here’s what you need:

For the shells:

  • 2/3 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1/8 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/4 cup milk
  • 1/4 teaspoon almond extract
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2 large egg whites

Mix it all together, fry the batter into taco shapes and then stuff with ice cream and drizzle a melted chocolate-coconut oil mix onto the tacos. Enjoy!

Adapted from Food 52.

7. Nutella and Red Berry Dessert Tacos

Credit: Nutella Berry. Digital Image. My Recipes. February 2017.

This one is simple and scrumptious.

  1. Preheat oven to 400°F. Roll sheets of aluminum foil into 3 loose rolls, each measuring approximately 17 inches long, 1 1/2 inches wide, and 4 inches tall. Place rolls parallel on a rimmed baking sheet.
  2. Stir together 3 tbsp sugar and 1 tbsp cinnamon in a small bowl. Brush 3 tbsp of melted butter evenly on both sides of the 6 tortillas, and sprinkle both sides evenly with sugar mixture. Drape 2 tortillas over each foil roll, so that they form a taco shell shape.
  3. Bake tortillas in preheated oven until tortillas hold their shape and are lightly browned, about 15 minutes. Transfer shells to a wire rack, and cool completely.
  4. Prepare the Filling: Combine 3/4 cup of heavy cream and 3 tbsp of powdered sugar in a large bowl. Beat with an electric mixer on medium-high until soft peaks form, about 2 minutes. Add 6 oz. of cream cheese and 1/3 cup of nutella; beat until smooth, 1 to 2 minutes.
  5. Assemble the Tacos: Spoon about 1/3 cup Filling into each Taco Shell. Toss together 1/2 cup of strawberries and 1/2 cup of raspberries in a small bowl. Top each taco with about 1/4 cup berry mixture. Dust tacos with powdered sugar.

Adapted from My Recipes

8. Full Chocolate Taco

CREDIT: “Chocolate Tacos Image” Digital Image. Food Fanatic. 25 April 2018.

Mix this in a bowl and set aside:

  • 1/2 cup Strawberries, Cut into small pieces
  • 1 tablespoon Sugar
  • 1/2 Orange, Juiced

Make Choco-Tacos:

  1. In a small saucepan combine 1/2 cup sugar, 1 stick butter and 1/3 cup corn syrup. Cook over medium-low heat until the sugar dissolves. Remove from heat.
  2. In a medium bowl combine 3/4 cup flour and 4 tsp cocoa powder. Mix well.
  3. Now pour the wet ingredients from the saucepan into the dry ingredients. Mix thoroughly.
  4. It’s easier to work in small batches for these cookies because they need to be hot to form the shape. Before you start to cook them, take out two to four wooden spoons, or any utensil with a round handle. Set them up on the counter so they are elevated.
  5. I take two cups and invert them about 4 inches away from each other, then lay the wooden spoon across the top. That way it makes a sort of balance beam for the cookie to rest on to form it’s shape. I set up 2-4 at a time. Then I have a couple of plates nearby lined with paper towels so its soft for the cookies to sit on till needed after they are formed.
  6. Make two cookies at a time. Spoon a small amount of the batter onto a cookie sheet covered with parchment paper, spooning the dough onto the farthest end. Then do the same on the opposite end. The dough melts and spreads like no one’s business, so make sure to allow room for it to spread.
  7. Pop the cookie sheet in the oven at 400 F for about 6-8 minutes.
  8. Lay in your taco molds and STUFF!

Adapted from Food Fanatic.

9. Banana Split Tacos

CREDIT: “Banana Split Tacos Photo” Digital Image. Food Fanatic. 25 April 2018.

This one you can whip up in no time. Fry your tortilla into a classic taco shape and immediately sprinkle with a cinnamon-sugar mixture. Let cool and stuff with strawberry, chocolate and vanilla ice cream in that order. Garnish and eat!

10. Another Chocolate Taco

CREDIT: “Unnamed. Digital Image. Gluten Free Love Story. 25 April 2018

This one’s for my food sensitive friends:

Here’s what you need:

  • 3 tbsps cacao powder
  • 1 1/2 cup warm water
  • 1 cup buckwheat flour
  • 3 tbsps grounded flax seeds + 6 tbsps warm water
  • 1/4 cup coconut sugar (or 4-5 packets of stevia for a candida friendly option)
  • 1/2-1 tsp cinnamon (optional)
  • coconut oil for greasing

Directions:

  1. Mix the flax seeds in the six tbsps of water and soak them for fifteen minutes.
  2. In the meantime, combine all the other ingredients in a bowl and blend well.
  3. Now, if the flax eggs are done soaking, blend them inside the batter.
  4. Heat up a griddle or skillet and grease it with coconut oil.
  5. 5. Pour on some batter and smooth it out until it is as thin as it can be.  Cook the chocolate tacos until they are thoroughly done.
  6. 6. Enjoy these chocolate tacos stuffed with maple syrup, coconut nectar, coconut whip cream, fruit, or jam.  If you want some candida friendly options, you could spread nut butters or even coconut whip cream on top.

Adapted from Gluten Free Love Story.

11. Tres Leches Coconut and Chocolate Fudge Ice Cream Tacos

CREDIT: “Tres Leches Coconut and Chocolate Fudge Ice Cream Tacos with Banana Peanut Salsa | halfbakedharvest.com @hbharvest” Digital Image. Half Baked Harvest. 25 April 2018.

This looks bomb and it’s easy as f. Just fry like normal and then dip in melted chocolate. Mix bananas, and a dash of cinnamon with coconut ice cream and stuff once the tacos have cooled a little. Drizzle LOADS of chocolate sauce on the taco and drizzle with walnuts. EAT.

Adapted from Half Baked Harvest

12. Cinnamon-Peach Ice Cream Tacos

CREDIT: “ice cream tacos recipe” Digital Image. Hilah cooking. 25 April 2018.

The pro tip for this is to score the inside centers of the tacos before placing them in the oven. That’s how they puff up! Be sure to sprinkle a cinnamon-sugar mixture on either side of the oiled tortilla before you pop them in. 10 minutes later at 350 F and you’re ready to load them up with ice cream!

13. Vegan S’Mores Tacos

CREDIT: “vegan s’more tacos | RECIPE on hotforfoodblog.com” Digital Image. Hot For Food Blog. 25 April 2018.

You guys! Stuff your homemade, cinnamon-spiked taco shells with vegan marshmallows and bake. Then, drizzle chocolate over it and accept your role as your town’s new cult leader.

14. Simple Strawberry Tacos

CREDIT: “DSC_0053” Digital Image. Keep It Simple Foods. 25 April 2018.

True to its blogger’s name, this one is simple. Just toast your tortillas, sprinkle chocolate chips (they’ll melt with the warmth of a tortilla blanket), top with strawberries and some whipped cream! I feel fancy.

15. Grain-Free Tacos

CREDIT: Unnamed. Digital Image. Morsels and Moonshine. 25 April 2018.

The money here is the grain-free taco shell. Here’s how to make them:

  • 2/3 c. almond flour
  • 1/3 c. starch (corn, tapioca, arrowroot, etc.)
  • 1 flax egg (3 T. water and 1 T. ground flax seed)
  • 1/4 tsp. sea salt
  • 1/4 c. coconut sugar
  • 1 tsp. vanilla-infused bourbon
  • 4 T. coconut oil, melted
  • 1/4 c. coconut cream (from the top of a chilled can of coconut milk)

In a medium-sized bowl, combine the almond flour, starch, salt, and coconut sugar. After the flax has thickened, add it to the bowl, along with the bourbon, oil, and cream. Stir until everything is combined well. It will be a thick dough. Pop it in a pizette maker and you’re golden.

Adapted from Morsels and Moonshine.

16. Neopolitan Choco Taco Recipe

CREDIT: “Neopolitan Choco Taco Recipe.” Digital Image. Mountain Mama Cooks. 25 April 2018.

Here’s how to make the homemade tacos for this one. You can figure out the rest. Mix this in one bowl:

  • 2/3 cup whole wheat pastry flour
  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • 1/4 tsp salt

Mix this in another bowl:

  • 2 tablespoons melted butter
  • 1/4 cup whole milk
  • 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  • 2 large egg whites

Add the wet ingredients to the dry to form a batter. Fry 2-3 spoonfuls of the batter into a pan to make tortillas!

Adapted from Mountain Mama Cooks.

17. Cocoa Cookie Taco Shell

CREDIT: “Cocoa Cookie Taco Shell” Digital Image. Rachel Ray. 23 April 2018.

Here’s how to make this magic happen:

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup flour
  • 1/3 cup natural unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 1/8 tsp. salt
  • 6 tbsp. butter, at room temperature
  • 2/3 cup sugar
  • 3 large egg whites
  • 1/4 tsp. pure vanilla extract
  • Chocolate shell topping, fillings and garnishes

Directions:

1. Preheat the oven to 350°. In a small bowl, whisk the flour, cocoa powder and salt. In a medium bowl, beat the butter and sugar, about 2 minutes. Add the egg whites and vanilla; keep beating, occasionally scraping down the bowl, until blended (the mixture may be lumpy). Add the flour mixture; beat to blend.

2. Set up a taco-making station: On a work surface, arrange two boxes (at least 3 inches high) about 12 inches apart. Arrange a 2-to 2 3/4-inch-diameter rolling pin with one end on each of the boxes, leaving space for the rolling pin to have 2 taco shells draped over it. (You can also use two paper towel tubes.) Drape a sheet of parchment paper over the rolling pin.

3. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Cut the paper in half crosswise; place 3 tbsp. dough in the center of each piece of parchment. Using a small offset spatula or the back of a spoon, spread the dough out to a 5-to 5 1/2-inch circle. Bake until the dough is firm, rotating the sheet halfway through, about 10 minutes for a softer taco and 12 minutes for a crispy taco. Let rest 15 seconds.

4. Working with 1 cookie at a time, lift the paper and cookie; gently invert over the rolling pin (leave the paper on). Using a pot holder (the cookie is hot), gently push the sides down to form a taco-shell shape. Let cool completely, about 30 minutes. Peel off the paper. Repeat with the remaining dough for 8 shells. Dip edges in chocolate shell topping; fill and garnish (see our Awesome Ice Cream Tacos).

Adapted from Rachel Ray.

18. Mini Rainbow Fruit Tacos with Cream Cheese Dip

CREDIT: “Mini Rainbow Fruit Tacos with Cream Cheese Dip” Digital Image. Sugar Dish Me. 25 April 2018.

Do not fear: there is cream cheese in here. Honestly, forget your bagels and sub in an oven toasted taco. Make your tacos like usual and stuff with a cream cheese-cinnamon-honey mixture and top with fruit! #Health.

19. Toffee Taco Sundaes

CREDIT: “Toffee Taco Sundaes” Digital Image. The Baker Mama. 25 April 2018.

Alright, this is the laziest, and (for that reason) most dessert-appropriate taco. Here’s how:

  1. Place tortilla(s) on a baking sheet. Brush the inside with melted butter. Sprinkle with cinnamon sugar. Heat tortilla(s) as directed on package.
  2. Once tortillas are heated, place on a serving plate or bowl and fill with two scoops of ice cream. Drizzle with warm caramel sauce, sprinkle with toffee bits and top with some whipped cream. Serve immediately.

Adapted from The Baker Mama.

Conchas Are An Important Part Of Mexican Cuisine Today, But Where Did They Come From?

Culture

Conchas Are An Important Part Of Mexican Cuisine Today, But Where Did They Come From?

sandra226 / Instagram

Are you the type to dip your conchas in café por las mananas? Or do you like them with beans and sour cream, oozing with all that sweet and salty goodness? No matter how you eat them, it’s undeniable that conchas are a quintessential part of the Mexican diet—they’re perhaps the most ubiquitous type of pan dulce, gracing the shelves of panaderias all over the US and Mexico. Instantly recognizable from their shell-like appearance (“concha” does mean “shell,” after all), conchas are a special feature at holidays like El Dia de Los Muertos and Navidad, but they’re always around for us to enjoy at any moment. And while they play a major part in the daily lives of Latinos across the country, they have a curious history that makes them taste that much sweeter.

Like many current Latin American foods, conchas can be traced back to the colonial era, when the Spanish brought some of their culinary customs across the Atlantic.

Credit: Pinterest

Wheat was deeply important to early Spanish settlers. Not only were wheat breads a major part of the European diet, but wheat also carried a religious connotation within their Catholic faith. Just think about misa: the ritual of the Eucharist involves the passing and consumption of a wafer, and this wafer is (and always has been) made from wheat.

In addition to the Spanish, French recipes also took root in the Americas as demand for wheat-based bread grew. The appearance of skilled French bakers in the 17th century led to the implementation of things like brioche buns, baguettes, and (por suerte) the early ancestors of panes dulces into the “New World” diet. (Fun fact: the first French military intervention in Mexico was actually called Guerra de los Pasteles, or The Pastry War.)

It is said that pan dulce is really the result of highly creative collaborations between Catholic nuns, indigenous women, and criollas innovating with the limited ingredients they had access to at the time. In fact, most panes dulces today consist of a blend of indigenous and European ingredients, (like corn flour and wheat flour). Conchas, specifically, are made from yeasted brioche dough—dough that is inherently eggy and fatty (read: ridiculously delicious).

The concha consists of two main parts: a sweet, bready base and a crunchy sugar topping.

Credit: Pinterest

The concha adopts the appearance of a shell by pressing a bread stamp over the topping during the final rise of the dough, right before placing it in the oven to bake. Although the bread itself is soft, airy, and delicious, it doesn’t usually bear much flavor—the topping is home to most of the taste and texture. These flavors can range from chocolate and vanilla to pink and yellow (yep, you read that right—if you’re a true concha connoisseur, you know that each color is its own flavor).  

The fusion of tasty French bread and sweet, sugary toping has less obvious origins. We can’t help but wonder: can this combination be traced back to European colonists attempting to appeal more to indigenous tastes by adding extra sugar to their breads? Perhaps the cookie dough topping helped preserve the bread somehow, when preservation methods were far less advanced? Maybe it was just a matter of preference—after all, French bakers gleaned a lot from German techniques, which often involved the liberal application of streusels (a sort of cookie dough) on cakes and breads.

A version of this sugar-topped sweet bread is also found across the globe in Japan, where it is known as melonpan.

Credit: Wikipedia

With the advent of globalization, it is, of course, quite possible that this sweet bread started with the concha in Mexico and later spread to Asia. But according to bread historian Steven L. Kaplan and culinary historian Linda Civitello, it is perhaps more likely that melonpan and conchas—despite their similarities—originated on different continents independently of one another. Civitello suggests that both iterations are, nevertheless, part of the “Iberian peninsula diaspora . . . when the Portuguese sailed east, the Spanish sailed west.”

And that’s a pretty apt suggestion: as the Spanish were invading the Americas in the early 1500s, the Portuguese likewise invaded Japan. The neighboring European countries implemented similar wheat-based bread-baking techniques, most likely using a broad range of recipes to assimilate their respective colonies to wheat, despite Japan’s indigenous preference for rice and Mexico’s preference for corn.

And although the concha has quite a long and impressive history—with generations of people knowing of its magical powers—only recently has it begun to gain traction in the upper echelon of the culinary world. Renowned bakers across the country are experimenting with its basic ingredients to yield super creative renditions. From sesame tahini to matcha green tea, there is a concha for every preference and taste.

A Geographer Just Created A Digital Map Of Mexico Highlighting Taco Shops And It’s A Thing Of Beauty

Culture

A Geographer Just Created A Digital Map Of Mexico Highlighting Taco Shops And It’s A Thing Of Beauty

@datavizero / Twitter

One of the biggest changes that the so called digital revolution has brought to our lives is the capacity that today’s computer systems have to process huge amounts of data. Processors today are able to run algorithms that bring together millions of data entries to find trends, cluster groups of similar objects and generate visualizations that can help us understand even the most complex aspects of science and culture. This is known popularly as “big data” and has changed the ways in which governments and companies understand reality and make decisions. For example, before high speed processing mathematicians took literally years to make sense of census data and find correlations between factors such as socioeconomic status, ethnicity, age and literacy levels.

Guess what? This can be done today with a few clicks as computers bring together millions upon millions of data entries and make sense of it all. It all sounds very geeky, but big data is defining how we live our lives, from how traffic lights coordinate to how much tax you gotta pay each year.

So all this geeky, nerdy stuff should be put to good use, o no?

Enter Mexican geographer Baruch Sangines, a true wizard when it comes to generating great data visualizations.

Credit: @datavizero / Twitter

This young scientist is the Chief Data Scientist at a company called Jetty, and he does some pretty groundbreaking research on pressing social issues such as housing and poverty.

His LinkedIn profile is pretty impressive: “Experience in public and private sector with skills to analyze and visualize data related to: commuting, transit, housing, tourism, migration, security, and urban environment. Expert in territorial analysis and passionate about the cartography and the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to visualize small and big data”. Wow. hold your horses, Einstein! He is a proud graduate of Mexico’s National University and has Master’s Degree on Demographics and Statistics. 

So why did he go viral on Mexican social media in the past few days? We mean, science is sexy but not viral sexy (sadly!). All because of this map:

Credit: @datavizero / Twitter

No, it is not a visualization of WiFi points in Mexico. No, it is not a rendition of cartel activity. No, it is not a highlight of the areas in which development runs at a faster pace. It is about something much, much more relevant to everyday life in Mexico lindo y querido. Any guesses?

Nothing is more important than a delicious taco when you most need it! 

Credit: The Splendid Table

Just look at that tortilla, a bit crispy, a bit soft… and that perfectly marinated meat… 

Well, Baruch created a visualization of taco stands in Mexico and nos ponemos de pie ante tal maravilla! 

Baruch called this visualization Taco Universe, and it showcases all the registered taco stands and shops in the country. We can clearly see that there is a high concentration of taco shrines in the capital Mexico City, and that hotspots like Cancun and Cabo are also highlighted, perhaps thanks to gringo tourism craving fish tacos. The scientists used the database Directorio Estadístico Nacional de Unidades Económicas (Denue) (Statistical National Directory of Economic Units) from the federal census agency INEGI. The map highlights how taco culture is primarily based in the center of the country, with local varieties such as Puebla’s tacos arabes (a shawarma like type) increasing the traffic in that area. 

But it is important to note that many taco stands are not accounted for (and that is not this scientist’s fault).

Thousands of Mexicans subsist in an informal economy with businesses that are not registered and pay no taxes. Among these businesses, mobile taco stands reign supreme. There are hundreds of taco stands all around the country that are set up informally. Sometimes you can find the most delicious tacos there! You can also find informal vendors selling tacos de canasta, a variety that is literally carried in a basket. This map does not take these informal enterprises into account, even though they are key to Mexico’s taco culinary tradition. 

So you are curious about tacos de canasta now, aren’t you? 

Well, just look at these crispy, sweaty, fat-rich babes. Tacos de canasta are filled with guisados or stews, or with refried beans. We are almost sure that Baruch did not include them in his map, but we can forgive him for making us crave unos taquitos (we bet you are calling your comadres or compas right now to hit the taco stand) and showing us how Mexico is a country that despite its many challenges still finds time to live up to the old adage: barriga llena, corazon contento.