Culture

Latinas Have Always Pushed The Envelope When It Comes To The Acrylic Nails Game

Acrylic nails have been a long-time fashion staple. Many of us have those early memories of a tía, a vecina, mom, etc., rocking the long red nails. Today, fake nails are not just a passing fad, but they have become an essential part of pop-culture, wearable art. Most famously, Cardi B (who has worn acrylics since before she was famous and has remained loyal to her same nail artist Jenny Bui) is one of the celebrities that has captivated the world which her famous “sets” which, no doubt, has inspired millions of fans.

Acrylic nails have always and will continue to be a woman’s strongest style accessory.

Credit: iamcardb / Instagram

One of the most iconic sets is part of a special exhibit at the Museum of Modern Art. Back in the 90s, Lil Kim (the original Queen Bee) asked her manicurist – celebrity nail artist Bernadette Thompson – to add something different to the nail design for a photoshoot for the Junior M.A.F.I.A. single “Get Money.” Thinking on her feet, Thompson cut up a dollar bill and…the rest is history. Thompson is credited with moving nail art into the world of high fashion since she often had to fight against editors of Vogue, and other big-name fashion magazines, to feature the nail designs worn by the artist.

They can tell any story you want and make any statement you can imagine.

Credit: Pinterest

However, acrylics have been here long before celebrities and Instagram. One of the most famous manicures has even held Olympic gold, thanks to Hall of Famer, Florence Griffith Joyner. “Flo Jo” – still considered the fastest women in history – not only was she an iconic Olympian, but she was also known for her distinctive fierce style and nails.

Credit: Pinterest

If we look at the history of nail art, India is the first to put color on the map in 5000 B.C. and are credited with being the ones to dip fingertips in red henna, a practice which is still seen today.

Different cultures across the world have incorporated acrylic nails.

Credit: Pinterest

But where did the concept of acrylic nails come from? The earliest traces can be found somewhere around 3000 B.C between Egypt and China. We can thank ancient Egyptians for almost every aspect of the beauty and cosmetics that we use today. They also introduced the notion of associating red with power and nobility. Noblemen and women would use berries to add red hues to their nails and if anyone from the lower class was caught with red nails, they were put to death. It is believed that the ancient royal Egyptians used ivory, gold, and bone to create extensions of their nails. Shorter nails implied that you needed your hands available to work, therefore, longer nails became a symbol of status, wealth and non-laboring hands.

Around the same time period, the ancient Chinese were the first to make a “permanent color stain” that would taint nails the same as nail polish does today. Here is also where we have the closest example to modern-day acrylics. The earliest dynasties created elaborate “fingernail guards” which gave the appearance of exaggerated long nails. The nail extensions were made of gold and precious gems; and as with the ancient Egyptians, long nails became a symbol of a someone that did not need their hands free for manual labor and therefore became a symbol of the ruling class. The ornate nails were usually worn on one hand, covering each finger (except the thumb) and only the most elite wore fingernail guards on both hands.

Credit: Pinterest

In both Egypt and China, higher-ranking men and kings also sported the acrylics and nail polish. When King Tut’s tomb was discovered in 1922, among his treasures they found the royal red nail coloring still in a sealed bottle, and the paint was still good.

Ancient Greece also got in on early acrylic nails. They believed in the healing energy of the moon and favored the appearance of moon shape nails. Greek women would place pistachio nut shells over their nails and in order to give a pleasing round appearance.

In South America, the Incas of Peru, are said to have been the first to have actually created nail art, by adding a decorative element – an eagle – to their nails.

Credit: Pinterest

Over time, artificial nails were slowly making their way throughout Europe and eventually made their way across the ocean.

In 1934, Dr. Maxwell Lappe – a dentist from Chicago – was working on a remedy to help his patients who bit their nails. Mixing two dental acrylic products – liquid and powder – he created Nu Nails. The mixture was thick and heavy, meant to create a hard nail protective covering.

However, these are the first official artificial nails documented in modern history.

Credit Pour L’ Image / Facebook

During the 1930s, starlets –  like Greta Garbo –  often tried to create their own “nail extensions” by wrapping foil around their fingers and then painting the foil red.

In 1957, twenty years after Nu Nails, another dentist – Dr. Frederick Slack – made a breakthrough. As the story goes, he broke his own nail and in order to create a temporary fix, he used dental acrylic and aluminum foil, and accidentally invented the first sculpted acrylic nail. The Slack family went on launch the modern acrylic nail industry and has since created several innovative products, including the first non-yellowing bonding formula, which is still used today.

The nail game is constantly growing and evolving.  Today, we are in an acrylic boom again, nails are not only a part of our fashion, but they can also be part of the larger conversation.

Your set can reflect your politics, religion, heritage etc.

Credit: Pinterest

Acrylic nails and nail art aren’t going anywhere, they have been here since the days of B.C. and will most likely continue to always be part of our human story. Although women of color in the United States are often chastised for wearing long and elaborate nails, it has never stopped us from doing so, nor should it. We are walking in the traditions of ancient royals and nobility – men and women – so continue to hold your head high, pick your colors, add some bling and don’t be shy; tú dale, and make the ancient world proud…live boldly.

READ: Cardi B’s Blinged Out Nails Have Inspired Reebok New Dazzling Limited-Edition Shoe

There’s An Indigenous Fashion Week In Canada And OMG It Looks Incredible

Fierce

There’s An Indigenous Fashion Week In Canada And OMG It Looks Incredible

VancouverIndigenousFashionWeek / Instagram

A fashion week is a fashion industry event — pretty self-explanatory, we know. The event, as the name says it, lasts approximately one week. And it’s a platform where fashion designers, brands or “houses” display their latest collections in runway shows to buyers and the media.

These events influence trends for the current and upcoming seasons and they’re pretty notorious for being somewhat elitist, lacking in representation and inclusivity. Indigenous Fashion Week decided to take matters into their own hands and they’ve been hosting an event that presents the most progressive fashion, textiles and crafts by Indigenous artists.

At the intersection of art, fashion and culture, Indigenous Fashion Week Toronto, features works by Native Canadian women.

IFW presents Indigenous-made fashion, textiles and craft, and it’s committed to exploring the connections between mainstream fashion, Indigenous art and traditional practice through presentations for broad audiences and industries.

IFW is bold, inclusive and accessible.

This fashion week challenges perceptions of, and celebrates Indigenous people and their culture with integrity, innovation and excellence. Founder and producer Joleen Mitton says the event is about far more than just celebrating Indigenous clothing designers.

Vancouver Indigenous Fashion Week kicked off with a red dress gala in honour of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls.

The red dress has become a symbol of resilience for many, and Mitton says that during IFW it will be featured to raise awareness about ongoing violence against Indigenous women. “That’s why the red dress event still exists,” she says. “I wish it didn’t have to, but it’s something that we keep on needing to talk about. If we can somehow tackle any issue with fashion, that’s what we’re going to do.”

The former model says she hopes the event can help create deeper connections between Canada’s Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities.

Mitton has spent years mentoring Indigenous girls who grew up in foster care in Canada and never knew much about their culture. She’s recruited some of them to be the face of the fashion show, and helped them reclaim their First Nations heritage through fashion.

The event encourages Indigenous people to openly celebrate their culture which has a long history of being subjugated in Canada.

For decades, the Canadian government banned First Nations potlatch — a traditional ceremony that included gift-giving, feasting and dancing. Today, Indigenous Fashion Week in Vancouver brings traditional regalia —from traditional patterns of blankets to capes displaying family animal crests— to the runway for all to see.

Mitton wants this Fashion Week to inspire young people and help them be proud of their culture and traditions.

“Indigenous fashion isn’t just about looking good, it’s about reclaiming parts of who we are,” said Mandy Nahanee, a First Nations storyteller and educator. “We can show our young people this is how beautiful, and amazing, and talented we are, that you should be walking down runways and standing tall with your chin up, being proud of who you are. We need everyone in the world to know that we’re still here.”

Emotional, Heartwarming And Downright Funny: Here Are The Best Wedding Photos Of 2019 According To Fearless Photography

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Emotional, Heartwarming And Downright Funny: Here Are The Best Wedding Photos Of 2019 According To Fearless Photography

Every two months the Fearless Awards recognize the best wedding photos in the world. The winning images are selected by a panel of expert curators from Fearless Photographers, a digital platform that connects couples with wedding photographers. The pictures have been making the rounds on the internet as the year draws closer to an end. We read that around 2 photos from every 100 are selected, and these ones we rounded up are emotional, heartwarming and downright funny. Which do you like best?

Lucha Libre Style

Kathruyn Krueger

Nothing like including the things you love on such a special day. This groom made sure that his love of Lucha Libre was known, and gave all of the members of his entourage, their own Luchador mask. Gotta love the originality.

A Mariachi Wedding

Gera Gallardo

Here’s the clear example of how a traditional wedding does not have to be conventional. This couple stuck to their roots and decided to give the event a very Mexican dress code with these Mariachi outfits —brb, just gonna look for a groom real quick so I can dress him up as a charro.

An emotional moment

Alberto Parejo

There can’t be a wedding without tears —of joy that is. This photo is so heartwarming it has tears welling up in my eyes.

Making the most of a destination wedding

Alex Beckett

I mean, if you have a place like Santorini as the backdrop for your wedding, no picture can really be a bad one. But tAlex Beckett, the photographer of this gem, used a beautiful play of light and shadow to create the magnified-effect of the married couple against a classic Greek house; dreamy.

Another epic destination wedding shot

Ana Maria Dumbrava

Again, if the wedding is being held at an amazing geographical location, the pictures are just going to be pure gold. This one here, with the happy couple, playfully sliding down the dunes is absolute goals —but also, there’s got to be a lot of sand in those clothes.

Confetti Madness

Joe Scrivens

Everything about this photo gives us chills. The energy, the colors, the vibrancy; it’s like we can feel the love through our screen. Can you?

An unconventional couple

Fiona Walsh

Some people have dessert tables at their weddings, others have board games, some offer boat rides or wild cocktails. Not this couple, they had a whole fair ride at their wedding. And the shot of them both riding at full speed is really a beauty.

A chill wedding by the lake

Juan Carballo Castro

More often than not, brides have the fame of being crazy, controlling, perfectionist maniacs. Not this one. Her entourage had already removed their gowns and jumped into the lake. We can only suspect that she’s about to do the same —and the mood of peace and fun that this photo is transmitting, really is making us question our fictitious wedding plans.

Female love

jake hannah

Ok so I’m crying now. Have you ever seen a photo that captures the essence of female love, companionship, empowerment and sorority more beautifully than this one by Jake Hannah? Okay, maybe you have, but this one is truly moving.

Otherworldly wedding vibes

David Hofman

This photo was actually taken in Brazil, but because of the visual effect, you could swear it was somewhere icy like Iceland or Canada. The couple seem to be walking on water, bathed in sunlight, and if that’t not an ideal metaphor for a happy marriage, then we don’t know what is.

Daddy’s Girl

Lucas Bezila

Crying again. Few things beat a deep father-daughter moment. Crazy to think that this man was about to give this woman, who once was his very own little girl, away. I’m weeping.

Post-wedding swim

Lanny Mann

Another laid back couple. Look at all that joy. A beautiful sunset, a happy moment, all smiles and warmth —we can almost feel the tropical weather just looking at it.

A mother’s love

Casian Podar

This is the visual definition of ‘tears of joy’. This abuelita holds on to her little girl; happily squeezing her, excited because finally, on this nieta’s case, she’ll never have to ask “¿Y el novio?” again.

Celebrate your culture

Jacki Bruniquel

We loved to see other cultures represented in the list of top wedding photos of the year. Not all brides wear white, some wear every color in the rainbow and this bright photo is really lighting up our day.

The couple’s best friend

Marius Dragan

Doggo parents will understand. One cannot simply get married and leave their best friend behind —and this good boy is clearly not ready to let go.

A very NYC wedding

Sascha Reinkin

This one is for the diehard New Yorkers. The ones that love their city so much, they couldn’t picture joining their lives to another, in a city that’s not their own. Absolutely love.