Culture

Latinos Never Do Basic Snacks And This Incredibly Photogenic Elotes Are Just Part Of The Wonders Of Latino Foods

Corn on the cob has taken the place as one of the most iconic foods in Mexican cuisine. They are usually grilled, covered in mayo, cheese, powdered pepper, and butter. That is the most basic and traditional way to make an elote. Of course, in today’s world of social media and rapid cultural sharing, nothing stays traditional and basic for long. The same can be said for the elote. As soon as people started to experience the smoky flavor of the grilled corn, minds and tastebuds went to work to create a different elote experience drawing on their own cultural backgrounds.

It is June so of course, someone is out there making Pride-ish elotes and they look magnificent.

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We just want to know what was used as the toppings. How did the creator of these proud elotes gets the colors? We just have a lot of questions about what the flavor profile is of this incredible creation.

Some people have taken it further and created a Korean BBQ version.

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That’s right. We found a Korean BBQ version of the iconic and delicious elote. Who doesn’t enjoy some Korean BBQ from time to time? Have you ever thought about putting it on an elote? Neither did we. Fortunately, we don’t have to imagine this anymore because someone created it so you can to.

Why not a simplistic Japanese take on the elote?

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The creator of this Japanese take on the elote really went for it and swapped out all the ingredients for Japanese staples. According tot he original poster’s caption, it just takes a little bit of “kewpie mayonnaise, yuzu, house hot sauce, and togarashi mixed nut crumble.” With that, boom, you have a simple and unforgettable Japanese elote.

Chapulines on your elote? Yes, please.

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Grasshoppers are already a staple in Mexican cuisine so why did it take so long for them to end up on an elote? They would add a nice crunch to the already widespread street food. Plus, the chapulines on the elote make for a great Instagram post because they are so photogenic.

Someone has decided that barbecue sauce is an acceptable addition to an elote.

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Not gonna lie, this actually looks really good. Who doesn’t enjoy the smokiness of grilled food combined with the tangy, sweet taste of barbecue sauce? Have you ever been to a southern barbecue? That’s what it’s all about.

Now, you know that Takis have been given a new purpose thanks to the elote craze.

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Honestly one of the greatest food inventions known to man. What a special treat this is when you take a bite and are greeted with the taste that makes Takis great. If you are already a fan of Takis, these will make your life that much better.

Fondue-style elote? Mira que fancy.

We all have a memory of the first time we got to have fondue. We thought we were so fancy when we dipped our foods into the hot cheese. Now, have you ever tried it with an elote? No? Well, maybe you should to really open your eyes to the world around you.

Someone did create a unicorn version and, well, it’s a thing.

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Tbh, we are curious about these. Are they sweet? How did you get the colors? Why did they think this was a good idea? This treat, while likely delicious, is a bit of a head scratcher since we can’t imagine the flavor.

This one looks like an amazing experience as it is guacamole, queso, y chiles serrano.

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This will burn so good as you munch away on the corn. How we have never thought to put guacamole on the elote is something we need to think about. Of course, this elote will cost extra because guac is just not something we treat with disregard.

Go on down to Disneyland and you can have an elote hotdog.

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You read that right. Disneyland has their own take on the elote by way of an elote hotdog. If you have had this concoction, please let us know what you think. Is it worth a trip to the park?

You know a Hot Cheetos elote was going to make an appearance.

Quick pro tip: Use Hot Cheetos Puffs when making these elotes. If you use regular Hot Cheetos, they will not turn out as great as these look. The puffs are more likely to become fine crumbs giving the elote the best coverage and really give you that mouth feel that you want.

When all else fails, just add the ingredients but overdo it so it will catch everyone’s attention.

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We aren’t totally shure what is going on here but we are already getting in line to try one. This is one of the most exaggerated elotes that we have seen and it is one of the greatest photos of an elote we have seen.

READ: The Laziest Food Hacks In All Of The Land Would Send Your Abuela To The Chancla

13 Thanksgiving Side Dishes to Bring That Will Showcase Your Latinidad

Culture

13 Thanksgiving Side Dishes to Bring That Will Showcase Your Latinidad

This year don’t bring some basic bland food to Thanksgiving. Bring something that will surprise your jefitos, impress your primos, nourish your vegan/vegetarian friends, and showcase your Latinidad. Forget boring mashed potatoes, over-salted, cream-sauced vegetables, store-bought pie, or being afraid of vegan/vegetarian dishes.

You’re an adult now, this is your chance to show your love through home-made food like your family has done all these years.

1. Tamales de Green Chile y Queso

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There’s nothing more festive than tamales over the holidays, and you don’t have to wait until Christmas. Prepare a dozen or so of these for yourself and anyone else who’d rather fill up on hearty Mexican food than dry turkey. This recipe is vegetarian if you make your own masa as instructed, but if you don’t care if they are fully vegetarian, or you just don’t have much time, you could buy prepared masa con manteca from any Latin American food market. Some of us never make our own masa!

2. Brussels Sprouts with Mexican Chorizo

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If you want to bring something a bit more traditional, or you’ve been asked to bring a vegetable side dish, try these Brussels sprouts. Don’t be afraid that people don’t like Brussels sprouts, cooked this way in the fat from the cooked chorizo, they are sure to impress. The red Mexican chorizo will turn the light part parts of the sprouts red, resulting in a festive, and Mexican flag-colored, green and reddish.

3. Sqirl’s Brussels Sprouts

http://blogs.kcrw.com/goodfood/2013/11/thanksgiving-side-recipe-sqirls-brussels-sprouts/

Or maybe you’d rather put chicharron powder on your Brussels. Cooked in butter, sherry vinegar, and fleur de sal. Sqirl LA’s food is so good people from all over the country, often come straight from the airport to eat there. It happens so often that the restaurant will happily store your luggage in their stock room. Bring this Latin-flavored recipe to Thanksgiving and show your friends what all the fuss is about.

4.  Tropical Chipotle Cranberry Sauce

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Many think that this Thanksgiving staple shouldn’t be messed with, but I can assure you that American Indians and English settlers didn’t eat cranberry sauce out of the can. That said, why not try something different and add some chipotle and pineapple to some fresh cranberries for sweet, sour, and spicy version.

5. Apple Chorizo Cornbread Stuffing

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Thanks to all the Latino’s in the US, chorizo is making a strong showing in Thanksgiving dishes. If you’ve been asked to bring stuffing not cooked in the bird, make this savory cornbread chorizo stuffing. This recipe also calls for cumin, oregano, and cilantro to help round out the Latin flavors.

6. Abuelo’s Papas Con Chile or Mexican Mashed Potatoes

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These mashed potatoes use Velveeta, but people all over the internet swear by this recipe. If you were asked to bring the papas try this dish. Tell us how it went.

7. Empanadas de Camote

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This recipe combines sweet potato, bacon, and queso fresco. Hearty and filled filled with protein and iron, these empanadas are a lighter alternative to bringing masa heavy tamales. With pretty folded edges, these empanadas will look pretty on any Thanksgiving table.

8. Pan Amasado or Chilean Bread Rolls

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So you’ve been asked to bring some rolls, but you don’t want to just go to Safeway and grab whatever they have, why not make Pan Amasado? The recipe, only calls for nine every-day ingredients, including shortening, egg, and butter. Sabroso!

9. Blistered Peppers with Lime

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Blistered Padrón or shishito peppers topped with spicy sea salt are common now on menus in upscale restaurants all around the country. They are super easy to make too. Bring this to Thanksgiving at your adventurous family/friend eaters, as in the same batch, one pepper can be quite mild and the next one quite hot.

10. Puerto Rican Mofongo

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If you’re looking to bring a taste of the island to Thanksgiving make this traditional style mofongo. Made of plantains, garlic, and pork rinds, this dish is an adaptation of a West African slave dish by Taino Indians made with ingredients available on the island. A similar dish is made by Dominicans.

11. Vegan Potato Adobo Tamales

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If you’re a vegan attending a non-vegan Thanksgiving, make yourself these hearty tamales. This recipe will show you how to make both the vegan masa (made with coconut oil instead of lard) and the adobo potato filling. The recipe also calls for garlic, oregano, clove, cinnamon, and cumin. Tamales without masa are lower in calories and saturated fat.

12. Vegan Chile Rellenos

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Okay, so many of the vegan recipes here are from the same person, Dora of Dora’s Table. This mujer, Dora, who was born and raised in México and to culinary school in New York, works extra hard to create vegan versions of traditional Mexican dishes, using traditional Mexican ingredients. Her Vegan Chile Rellenos use poblano chiles and vegan cheese. On her website, Dora warns that this recipe isn’t what she’d call healthy.

13. Empanadas de Argentina

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If you’re looking to bring the taste of South America to Thanksgiving dinner, make these Argentinian Tamales. They are made with ground beef, bell pepper, and Latin-flavor spices. You’ll save time on the dough too because it’s made with store-bought puff pastry flour.

Sure, Pumpkin Pie Is Great, But Here Are 12 Latino Desserts That Are Even Better For Thanksgiving

Culture

Sure, Pumpkin Pie Is Great, But Here Are 12 Latino Desserts That Are Even Better For Thanksgiving

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We Rounded Up Our Favorite Latino Desserts That You Should Have At Every Thanksgiving Dinner

12 Cold Weather Comfort Desserts Every Latino Should Make For Thanksgiving

From Churros To Buñuelos And Atole—12 Latino Desserts That Are Perfect For Thanksgiving

Sure, there’s nothing wrong with a good old pumpkin pie, but if you’re lucky enough to attend a Latino Thanksgiving, boy oh boy, you’re in for a treat. Latinos don’t settle for just one dessert option, we have plenty to choose from and you best believe a few tías will bring different ones. From pastel de tres leches to churros and all the drinks that go with them, there are some wonderful treats in store. Yes, more often than not, a good cafecito will pair up perfectly with your postre, but how about a Mexican ponche? Or a Guatemalan Atol? We rounded up our fave cold-weather desserts that every Latino should whip up for Thanksgiving.

1. Alfajores

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These soft, delicate and buttery cookies are held together by the addicting caramel sauce, an elixir of the gods; dulce de leche. This option goes perfectly with a good old cafecito and chisme. That sobremesa is sure to get lit with all that sugar pumping up the tías and abuelitas. 

2. Arroz con leche

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A foolproof winter classic. Arroz con leche is the ultimate Latino comfort dessert any time of year tbh. Try it calientito with a good amount of cinnamon and raisins. Provecho!

3. Buñuelos —Colombianos and Mexicanos

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The Colombian iteration isn’t quite a sweet treat as it’s filled with cheese, but the addition of brown sugar, butter and tapioca make it a dessert in our book. As for the Mexican version, they’re usually made during the winter holidays. Mexican Buñuelos are made of fried dough, covered in cinnamon sugar and if you’re not about fried dough covered in cinnamon sugar, idk what to tell you, there’s something wrong going on.  

4. Chocoflan

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Also known in Mexico as ‘Impossible Cake’, this delicious mass of goodness combines two great things into one god-sent hybrid. If you love flan, but would also like to have a slice of chocolate cake, Latina moms everywhere say; “¿Por qué no los dos?” The rich dense chocolate, topped with creamy vanilla flan, drizzled with a thick layer of cajeta is, quite literally, what dessert dreams are made of. 

5. Churros

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There’s something so satisfying when biting into a warm, doughy, crunchy and sugary churro. You can find these delicious treats all over Latin America, and they’re particularly yummy when paired with a cup of hot chocolate! Extra points if you stuff them with cajeta or chocolate. 

6. Flan

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Almost every Latin American household will have its own version of flan. From Puerto Rico to Costa Rica and everywhere in between, Latinos love flan. The creamy vanilla-flavored concoction is basically irresistible. 

7. Natilla Colombiana

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This Colombian custard dessert is very traditional during Christmas, but we like to think that it’s also good at any time of the year. Natilla is a rich, custard-like dessert traditionally served alongside the deep-fried cheese buñuelos we told you about earlier. You’ll definitely have to forget about la dieta if you want to have this option. 

8. Suspiro de Limeña

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Its name literally translates to “Sigh of the lady from Lima.” This Peruvian dessert is definitely sigh-inducing. The creamy, caramel-like custard, topped with a Port flavored meringue is an extra sweet treat for this cold season. The dessert originated in the city of Lima, and it is said that it gained its name after a poet said it tasted soft and sweet, like the sigh of a woman.

9. Pastel de Tres leches 

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This quintessentially Latino cake is made with three types of milk: evaporated milk, sweetened condensed milk and whole milk. This is definitely not for the lactose intolerant. The cake soaks up all these liquids, making it a super decadent treat. If you’ve never had this traditional Latino dessert, prepared to be delighted, and have the coffee pot a-ready. 

10. Ponche Navideño

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Traditional Mexican fruit punch is a hot, delicious concoction. Made with more than ten fruits including apple, tamarind, jamaica, tejocotes, raisins. This punch is spiced with cinnamon, clove, and piloncillo. It’s basically Christmas in a cup.

11. Camotes en dulce 

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Mexican candied sweet potatoes are a must. Día de los Muertos, on Nov. 1, marks the beginning of Camote season. ‘Camotes Enmielados’ is made of sweet potatoes, simmered in a cinnamon and piloncillo syrup. This dish makes for the perfect fall treat. 

12. Guatemalan Atol

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Made of ground corn, the flavors of this drink range from cinnamon to black beans to chocolate to cajeta. Guatemalan Atol, or Atole in Mexico, is a drink made differently in many countries of Latin America, but there’s one thing that remains the same everywhere, and that is that it’s a fall-winter staple you can’t miss out on.

READ: 13 Thanksgiving Side Dishes to Bring That Will Showcase Your Latinidad