Culture

YouTube Has A New Star In This Abuelita Who Is Sharing Her Traditional Mexican Recipes With The World

One of the downsides of online celebrity is the predictability of who will become an influencer. By now, influencers have created a well established culture and even an industry. Some of them even have PR agencies to manage their affairs! By now, influencers in sectors such as fashion and video games have established formulas for monetizing content. This leads to a creative rut and lack of originality, so it is always refreshing with a totally different type of influencer enters the stage with de mi rancho a tu cocina

Enter this abuelita who totally immerses us into her lovely ranch and the traditional cooking methods that are passed down through generations.

Credit: YouTube / De mi rancho a tu cocina

You can´t get more authentic than that! Doña Ángela is from the great state of Michoacan, in Mexico. She has had an unexpected but very welcome success on social media. This is how she was introduced: leisurely walking among her crops.  

She opened the channel “De mi rancho a tu cocina” on August 19, 2019. And her viewership numbers will shock you!

Credit: YouTube / De mi rancho a tu cocina

In just over a month she has gathered over 300,000 followers and her videos (just 13 in total) have been watched over seven million times. There are plenty of influencer-wannabes who spend months, or even years, deploying carefully curated accounts and never get that kind of following. 

Her secret: absolute honesty and a sense of wholesomeness that is hard to fabricate.

Credit: YouTube / De mi rancho a tu cocina

This glorious abuelita talks to her audience as if we all were her nietecitos chulos. She also loves her land and her cooking with a passion that is impossible to make up. The ingredients are all fresh and the rustic nature of her kitchen is the total opposite of pristine settings used in high-production YouTube cooking channels. In short: es la neta la abuelita. 

Just look at those gorditas fluffing up and up and up… 

Credit: YouTube / De mi rancho a tu cocina

Seriously, if you are not salivating by now there is something seriously wrong with you… or you are not really into Mexican food. 

She walks us through every stage of the process with a nonchalant elegance.

Credit: YouTube / De mi rancho a tu cocina

We love her classic abuelita apron and the way in which she truly enjoys putting classic dishes together. The video series is also an ode for simplicity: you don’t need fancy and expensive kitchen equipment to let magic happen. 

And just look at that sweet, happy, content expression.

Credit: YouTube / De mi rancho a tu cocina

She has her gorditas just as she liked them, con poquita lechuga. Can we just move in with her already?

This is organic AF, ok?

Credit: YouTube / De mi rancho a tu cocina

Our amazing cooking master just walks to her crops and harvests flor de calabaza. If you want to buy it at a fancy hipster grocer te va a salir en un ojo de la cara. Hers is a true connection to the soil and an intuitive knowledge of nature. You can’t get more organic than that despite whatever certification or what-e-ver. 

And she prepares whole menus: atolito to go with that fresh flor de calabaza?

Credit: YouTube / De mi rancho a tu cocina

What sommeliers call “pairings” she simply calls the best way to enjoy dishes. With a delicious traditional beverage 

Look at that traditional comal…

Credit: YouTube / De mi rancho a tu cocina

Complete with coal and the marks left behind by countless sessions in the kitchen. 

Damn, that salsa has gotten our juices flowing.

Credit: YouTube / De mi rancho a tu cocina

We are talking about saliva, malpensados, puercos estos. 

And what about a delicious breakfast of eggs bathed in salsa?

Credit: YouTube / De mi rancho a tu cocina

She, of course, gets the eggs from her ranch as well. We seriously can’t think of a better way to wake up. Move over avocado on toast! This is the real deal, ese! 

And look at that pot brewing cafe de olla.

Credit: YouTube / De mi rancho a tu cocina

Imagine waking up to the aroma of a hot clay pot containing coffee with piloncillo and spices…. it is like dessert in a cazuelita and Mexico’s answer to all those over-the-top Starbucks jaladas. Give us a cafecito de olla over a frapuccino anytime!

Could she be the beginning of a trend?

Credit: YouTube / De mi rancho a tu cocina

We certainly hope so! The more we know about REAL Mexican grub, the better!

Because classics never get old.

Credit: YouTube / De mi rancho a tu cocina

Here she is making arroz a la mexicana, red Mexican rice as the gringos call it. 

Can it get any better?

Credit: YouTube / De mi rancho a tu cocina

Spoiler alert: it can’t.

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Mexico Wins International Award For $100 Peso Note Featuring 17th-Century Nun Sor Juana

Culture

Mexico Wins International Award For $100 Peso Note Featuring 17th-Century Nun Sor Juana

Over the last few years, Mexico has been updated its currency to make it more secure from counterfeiters and to highlight the country’s diverse history. One of the country’s newest bills is a $100 peso note featuring a 17th-Century female historical figure and it’s winning major international awards for its design and history.

Mexico’s $100-peso bill has been named banknote of the year for 2020 by the International Bank Note Society (IBNS). As printer and issuer of the note, the Bank of México beat 24 other nominees to the award, and the Sor Juana bill led the way from the start of the voting process.

The note features national heroine Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, with the monarch butterfly biosphere reserve on its reverse.

In its announcement the IBNS wrote: “Mexico’s award-winning entry may provide a template as other countries reconsider how they design and promote new banknotes.  The successful design in eye-pleasing red combines Hispanic architecture, a famous female Hispanic literary figure and a tribute to the world’s fragile ecosystem.”

Past bank note of the year recipients include Aruba, Canada, Uganda, the Faroe Islands, two time winner Switzerland and three time winner Kazakhstan, among others.

So who was Sor Juana and why was she important to Mexico?

Born in 1651, Sor Juana was a self-educated nun and intellectual renowned for her poetry, writing and political activism, who criticized the misogyny of colonial Mexico.

Beginning her studies at a young age, Sor Juana was fluent in Latin and also wrote in Nahuatl, and became known for her philosophy in her teens. Sor Juana educated herself in her own library, which was mostly inherited from her grandfather. After joining a nunnery in 1667, Sor Juana began writing poetry and prose dealing with such topics as love, feminism, and religion.

Mexico was up against 24 other countries in the nomination process.

In second place was Kate Cranston who appears on the Bank of Scotland’s 20 pound note. The businesswoman appears on the obverse and she is recognized for being the owner of the famous tea rooms inaugurated in 1903 and that today are a tourist attraction.

In third place there was a triple tie between the 20 pound note of the Ulster Bank of Northern Ireland whose design features flora and buskers. The one from the Bahamas of 5 dollars with the image of the junkanoo dancer, and the one of 50 dollars from Fiji.

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Protesters In Mexico Take To Streets To Demand Justice For Dog Brutally Killed By Man With An Axe

Things That Matter

Protesters In Mexico Take To Streets To Demand Justice For Dog Brutally Killed By Man With An Axe

Residents of one Mexican city have taken to the streets to demand justice for a local stray dog who was brutally killed in an axe attack last month. Video of the incident was uploaded to social media and quickly went viral, leading to large protests in the Sinaloan city of Los Mochis.

Hundreds marched in Los Mochis to seek justice for a dog killed by man with an axe.

Hundreds took to the streets in Los Mochis, Sinaloa to demand justice for Rodolfo, a mixed breed dog killed with an axe on March 21. They showed banners that read “Justice for Rodolfo & for all who have no voice,” “We won’t stop until we have justice,” and “Justice for Rodolfo,” among others.

Despite the COVID-19 regulations, the participants in this new march, children, women and men, calmly marched through the center of the city of Los Mochis to make it clear that they are against animal cruelty and demanded justice for Rodolfo, who was a local stray dog. The demonstration gained traction after a video of the attack on Rodolfo, also known by Heart, Pirate and Shorty, was uploaded onto social media.

The predominantly young crowd marched to the state prosecutor’s office where environmental activist Arturo Islas Allende delivered a criminal complaint. Many brought their pets to the march and carried placards demanding the killer be sentenced to prison. One placard read: “Justice for Rodolfo and for all those that don’t have a voice.”

The suspected attacker, José “M,” a student at a Sinaloa university, has already delivered a preparatory statement to officials. Islas Allende questioned the morality of the killer. “We don’t want a psychopath like him as our neighbor,” he said.

The suspect’s girlfriend claimed that he killed the dog to protect her.

The girlfriend of the alleged attacker took to social media in his defense, saying the dog had attacked her days earlier and injured her face and hands.

On her Facebook account she claimed that medical treatments for her injuries had cost 8,000 pesos (US $400) and uploaded photographs of the injuries caused by the dog’s bites.

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