Culture

Dad Shaves Baby’s Head While Mom Was Sleeping And We Think A Latina Abuelita Had Something To Do With It

Dads, you have to love them, especially when they’re left to rule the house when mom’s away. While they generally try their hardest, some dads can be big kids and the house will essentially remain unsupervised by a responsible adult. This mom learned that the hard way after she handed over the torch of responsibility to dad while she took a little nap. She woke up to find that dad had shaved off the baby’s hair and her reaction is priceless.

This video proves that sometimes you just can’t trust a Latino dad alone with the children.

New mom Jasmin Aileen Valero, wanted to catch up on some sleep after the exhausting task of taking care of her newborn baby. Dad, Joshua Luevanoz, was entrusted with watching over baby Jazlyn, while mom took a little nap. To Jasmin’s surprise, she woke up to find out that dad had shaved Jazlin’s entire head of hair, leaving their newborn looking like a little diaper-wearing kiwi.

Mom clearly didn’t expect to wake up to such a surprise. Suffice it to say, she wasn’t happy.

Credit: @jasmin_valero / Twitter

The Californian family shared the video of Jasmin being given the shock of a lifetime and the internet loved it, except for a few viewers going as far as to call it ‘child abuse.’

Jasmin had only just woke up when Joshua handed her the baby and began filming. Next thing you know, he’s pulling a little blanket off Jazlyn’s head to reveal their newly bald baby. Jasmin’s reaction is one of true surprise or horror if you will. “Why’d you do that?” she asks holding back shocked laughter and tears. Many news outlets have reported that dad shaved the baby’s head as a prank. But if you grew up Latino, you know that in a Latino household, shaving a baby’s head is no prank, it’s serious business and there’s bound to be a group of elders putting pressure on the new parents to rid the child of his or her hair, for the sake of tradition. 

 Behind every bald baby, there’s an Abuelita or tía telling new parents everything about the millenary tradition of shaving the baby’s head.

Credit: @planetamama / Twitter

“Is shaving the newborn baby’s hair necessary for his hair to grow stronger?” 

The Latino tradition of shaving the baby’s hair is true and old. Many call it: pelar, rapar, rasurar or afeitar al bebé. It’s a tradition widely spread throughout many Hispanic countries. I can confirm that it’s a common practice in Venezuela, Colombia, Puerto Rico, Dominican Republic, Spain, Ecuador, and Mexico. Why do crazy moms, abuelas —and unsuspecting dads as it turns out shave the baby’s hair? According to tradition, the new hair will grow thicker, more evenly, and beautiful. 

Experts explain that shaving a baby’s hair will not make it thicker or change its texture. Baby hair changes depend on the normal development of the child, and his or her genetic make-up. Where this tradition started, I wouldn’t know, trying to find out would be like trying to trace back the origin of ‘el cucuy, ‘nobody knows, it’s just been a tradition for centuries and centuries. There’s no information explaining where we picked up this idea from. But it is, unfortunately for this mom, still a very common practice. 

Latinos aren’t the only peoples who shave off little innocent babies’ heads. Muslims do it too, perhaps this is where the tradition started?

Credit: @hztweets / Twitter

Surprisingly, Latinos aren’t the only people who believe in this magic capillary legend. Shaving the baby’s head on his seventh day on earth is a common practice amongst Sunnah Islamic followers. They believe that only boys should have their heads shaved as “a means to drive them closer to Allaah.” If we keep in mind that many Latino traditions originate from Spain, which was occupied by Muslims for centuries, maybe that has something to do with how all the shaving started.

READ: These Two ‘Traditions’ Seem To Only Be Normal To Latinos

This Business Woman Knows How Hard It Is To Get Proper Haircare Being Latina —So She Opened Her Salon And Fixed It

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This Business Woman Knows How Hard It Is To Get Proper Haircare Being Latina —So She Opened Her Salon And Fixed It

themodlabb / Instagram

I don’t know about you, but I have definitely dropped hundreds of dollars on haircuts and color treatments at boujee hair salons, in hopes of attaining a honey caramel ombré on my coarse, dark mane —courtesy of my Latina DNA. Most of them played out as horror stories. More often than not I’ve walked out of a salon with brittle, over-processed, damaged hair after too many hours with foils in it, because “Your hair is so thick! let’s wait a little longer.” After too many failed attempts that made my hair look orange rather than ‘caramel’, I gave up on coloring my locks with technicians who didn’t know how to work with hair like mine. That’s why when I heard that there’s a Chicana out there cutting and coloring hair of every texture; my damaged mane and I, almost booked a trip to Dallas.

The Latinx community is obsessed with beauty, yet the industry does not cater to our needs.

twitter @esmeerubio

We all know that the beauty industry has rarely catered to women of color. Which is a huge paradox if you think of it because, it’s common knowledge that there is an undeniable obsession with beauty amongst the Latinx community. A study in 2015 called Hispanic women “the foundation for beauty sales” because it found that beauty sales increased by 8 percent among Hispanics, while it dropped almost 2 percent among non-Hispanics. Likewise, skincare and hair care increased within the Hispanic community and dropped among non-Hispanics. 

The study also found that Hispanics were spending approximately $44 on a single product, while non-Hispanics were spending almost half that price for a similar product. These numbers make it pretty clear that we have the spending power —and the need for beauty is obviously there, so why are so few brands, technicians, and businesses betting on us?

Jessica saw a gap in the market and —thankfully for us— she decided to act on it.

instagram @jakethegreat_88

Jessica “Jake” Tafoya, is the entrepeneur behind The Mod + Body Labb, a  salon that takes care of the skin and hair of women of color in Dallas. And not only does she cater to every hair texture, length and color that walks through her doors, most importantly she builds upon what her Mexican family taught her by creating an atmosphere for other women of color to feel welcome and taken care of —hallelujah!

Tafoya dreamt of opening her own beauty business years before she actually took the leap of faith and opened it.

instagram @jakethegreat_88

The gap of time between dreaming about opening her business and actually opening it, is just one of the things she credits for helping her build a business worthy of her dreams. Tafoya also credits her Latinidad, taking pride in it and embracing it, is what helped her get to where she is now. 

“I embrace my Latinidad as my identity and additional fuel to give me the strength to overcome every failure and detour set on my path,” explains Tafoya in an interview with Forbes. “Through the close bond of my family, I have been able to remain challenged and fully determined to reach my goals. Our culture is one to celebrate and learn from as we carry certain characteristics that will help us flourish from both a personal and career perspective.” 

Jessica “Jake” Tafoya is now a full fledged businesswoman who empowers and celebrates beauty.

instagram @themodlabb

Jake now has three salons for skin and hair, offering a full-service beauty experience for women of color in Dallas, TX. “I saw a significant gap within the beauty industry and wanted to create an environment where we celebrate every hair texture and skin tone while empowering the multifaceted woman,” shares Tafoya. 

‘We strive to give our guests a place where they feel welcome and where their needs are understood and met. We encourage each one of our customers to strive for self love, to feel confident and love who they see beyond their reflection in the mirror.” 

At Mod Labb, you can get all done up with services that cater to your specific hair texture and skin tone.

instagram @lissluvshair

Mod Labb offers curl cuts and hair extensions in addition to all other hair services while the Body Labb is all about skincare and cosmetic services including brow shaping and makeup. “As part Native American and Latina, my hair texture and skin tone is unique. It had always been difficult to find a professional skilled enough to know how to cater to my long, coarse hair and olive skin,” shared Tafoya. “After a couple of years of experience under my belt, I decided to transform that gap into an opportunity and create my business.”

Tafoya doesn’t only cater to people of color, she makes sure to put her money were her mouth is, and employs only people of color, too. 

instagram @themodlabb

The Mod Labb started as a 400 square-foot space that she opened three years after graduating from hair school in 2010 with only two employees at just 25 years old. She later opened the Body Labb across the street and now she’s opening the Mod + Body Labb in Arlington in the Dallas-Fort Worth area. Not only does Tafoya cater to people with hair like hers, what’s more,100 percent of her staff is made up of people of color. This gesture is more profound than the average salon goer might realize when women of color continuously struggle to find adept stylists.

Visit The Modd Lab at 1316 West Davis Street and The Body Lab at 1319 West Davis Street, open everyday from 9am to 9pm.

#OKBoomer Is The Hashtag Millennials Are Using To Let Baby Boomers Know Their Opinions Aren’t Wanted

Culture

#OKBoomer Is The Hashtag Millennials Are Using To Let Baby Boomers Know Their Opinions Aren’t Wanted

god_damn_sam / Instagram

This country — already divided between liberals and conservatives — is now enduring another division, but this time it’s a generational thing. Young people, who typically get the brunt of being a scapegoat, are calling foul against older people who never get tired of life-splaining. This type of separation is nothing new, the only difference with generational venting is that we now have the internet to help us shout it out from the rooftops. Thanks to memes, TikTok, and hashtags, each message whether valid or not gets punctured into the cultural-sphere and lives there for a week or so and then hibernates until the next internet phenomenon. This week the Boomers are to blame for our societies woes — sort of. 

Before we explain the #OKBoomer hashtag, here’s a breakdown of generational age groups, so you can keep track of the players:

Credit: juicydumpstur / Instagram

Here’s where each age group stands. 

  • The Greatest Generation (or GI Generation): Born in 1924 or earlier.
  • The Silent Generation: Born 1925-1945. 
  • Baby Boomers: Born 1946-1964. 
  • Generation X: Born 1965-1976. 
  • Xennials: Born 1977-1984.
  • Millennials: Born 1985-1996.
  • Generation Z: Born 1997-current.

Now back to the drama.

Generation Z has been using the term “Ok Boomer” for a couple of months. Now, the rest of the world has finally caught on thanks to some trendy new merch and Twitter dialogue.

Credit: thesnobette / Instagram

After discussing the “Ok Boomer” phrase with a Gen Z person in my household, they told me that it’s basically a term that young people are saying in response to old people who think they know better. “It’s like us saying ‘whatever.'”  They added, “we are just making fun of them and everybody.” The sentiment goes a lot deeper than that. 

“The older generations grew up with a certain mindset, and we have a different perspective,” 19-year-old Shannon O’Connor told the New York Times. O’Conner created a very stylish hoodie with the “Ok Boomer” phrase on it, and she sold more than 10,000 sweatshirts. “A lot of them don’t believe in climate change or don’t believe people can get jobs with dyed hair, and a lot of them are stubborn in that view. Teenagers just respond, ‘Ok, boomer.’ It’s like, we’ll prove you wrong, we’re still going to be successful because the world is changing.”

Now some (white) Boomers are getting their panties in a bunch and saying #OkBoomer is like using the N-word. Um… don’t think so, buddy. 

Credit: @Oskaer__13 / Twitter

Yes, “Bob Lonsberry,” a Christian, father, and veteran actually compared “OKBoomer” to the N-word. He just proves some older people need to take a seat and shut up. 

Some have wondered if older Latino people would ever be okay if their kid was flippant enough to dismiss them with that term.

Credit: Twitter

Latinos on social media said they would never disrespect their elders by saying “OKBoomer” to them. While others shared, Latino Boomers aren’t to blame for today’s societal issues. 

We’re not sure how long “OKBoomer” will last, but just for posterity purposes, here are some of the best #OKBoomer tweets, memes, videos, and songs — there’s a lot out there.

Credit: @eugenegu / Twitter

Where’s the lie?

This little diddy goes to those 65 and older.

It’s pretty catchy and you can dance to it. 

Let’s keep one thing straight: a hashtag isn’t nearly as bad as oppression. 

Credit: @dick_for_nipple / Twitter

Why do Boomers have such thin skin?

Gen Z’ers are bringing up serious issues. 

Credit: @morganisawizard / Twitter

This “OKBoomer” trend might seem silly to some, but when you break it down, these young people will be confronted with a new way of life that will be nothing like anyone has ever experienced, including Boomers.

A fight to the death! Or at least a fight on social media. 

Credit: @Terlerr / Twitter

That work of art belongs in the Louvre museum in Paris. 

This Gen Z master should run for president.

Credit: @LouisatheLast / Twitter

Mr. Trump, now that is what you call a good thread. 

If you’re wondering when and how you can use the “OK Boomer” term and tell off your least favorite old person to be quiet, here’s a near-perfect example

The video above features a white older male telling all of Generation Z that their idea of a utopian world is not possible because it’s not sustainable. Yadda Yadda Yadda, “ok boomer.”

READ: AOC Has Receipts For Abuelas That Breakdowns The Thousands Of Dollars Worth Of Reasons Why You’re Not Having Kids