Culture

His Parents Gave Him A Dream Come True With His Very Own Costco Birthday Party And We Have Serious FOMO

We all know the wonders of Costco. Everything you might ever need is available in mass. Who doesn’t love buying three gallons of salsa and pounds of tortilla chips? Well, one little boy named Armando took it to the next level by hosting a birthday party at the Costco in Norwalk, California. The Costco location closed its food court to host the little man’s special birthday. This is one of the greatest things you will see on the internet today and you’re welcome.

Armando knew that his fourth birthday could only take place at one place: Costco.

Credit: armando_loves_costco / Instagram

Like, OMG! How did we not get invited to this party? So many people have memories of wandering around Costco with mami y papi for hours. Obviously, the best part of the trips was always free samples everywhere.

Of course, he had his own Costco employee outfit because, duh.

Credit: armando_loves_costco / Instagram

Legit, this is the greatest Halloween costume in case you need some inspo. Everyone will recognize you and Costco fans will love it. If you have any costume contests coming up, give this a try.

Every party guest got a very special name tag.

Credit: armando_loves_costco / Instagram

It is important to pay attention to details and this family spared no expense when it came to celebrating their little man’s special day.

The party included some fun and challenging activities, like guessing the price of items in Costco.

A true test of knowledge and appreciation. Who thinks they would be able to win this game? Costco is one of the greatest establishments for Latino families. We know we all have big families and Costco has been a lifesaver for us.

Of course, there was a piñata.

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Broke my custom @costco piñata 🙌🏼

A post shared by Armando E. Martinez (@armando_loves_costco) on

That’s right. They bought Armando a custom Costco piñata and we are all screaming. What a treasure for this boy. And, tbh, this family seems a lot nicer about letting him hit the piñata than ours were.

Just look at how happy all of the party guests are celebrating at Costco.

Credit: armando_loves_costco / Instagram

Looks like the conga line is still a thing, folks. No matter how long it’s been since we had a birthday party like this, the conga line will never die.

Now, Armando is not a fair-weather Costco fan.

Credit: armando_loves_costco

His Instagram account is named after his love for the chain store. He clearly likes to spend time at his local Costco and his love for the store is something we can all relate to.

Like, he would clearly make it home if he could.

Credit: armando_loves_costco / Instagram

Literally, same. There is nothing you can’t find at Costco and this little one is already years ahead of his peers with his appreciation of the bulk store.

Happy birthday, Armando!

Credit: armando_loves_costco / Instagram

This is one birthday party everyone should be talking about.

READ: An Instagram Influencer And Actress Threw A Mexican-Themed Birthday For Her Daughter And Her Fans Are Divided

There’s No Mexican Christmas Without Posadas: We Rounded Up 11 Facts About Them That You Probably Never Knew About

Culture

There’s No Mexican Christmas Without Posadas: We Rounded Up 11 Facts About Them That You Probably Never Knew About

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For many Latinos, the word posada, evokes chilly nights surrounded by family and friends, singing, enjoying a warm meal (of tamales and ponche, of course), and spreading holiday cheer all around. If you have never been lucky enough to be invited to one of these celebrations, read on to find out a few facts that will explain what posadas are all about.

1. The word posada literally means ‘inn or lodging’, and traditionally posadas are a celebration of the Christmas story.

twitter @radiodelfin

Posadas involve a reenactment of Joseph and Mary’s search for a shelter where the Virgin Mary could safely give birth to Jesus in Bethlehem.

2. Posadas are a distinctly Mexican Catholic tradition, which is also celebrated all over Latin America and even across the world.

Instagram @latino_in_chicago

The tradition has spread to places like Colombia, Honduras, Nicaragua, El Salavador, and many other Latin American countries, but it originated in Mexico as a Spanish celebration used by friars to convert indigenous people into Catholicism.

3. Posadas are a  celebration of the novenario before christmas.

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‘Novenario’ means nine days, which means that posadas take place during the nine days before Christmas Eve. The none days running up to Christmas, represent the nine months of The Virgin Mary’s pregnancy. In Colombia, this period of time is called ‘La Novena’, and it‘s turned into a celebration similar to posadas but that in Colombia, Venezela and Ecuador is known as ‘La Novena de Aguinaldos’.

4. Posadas in Mexico began as a way for the Spaniards to teach native people about Christmas.

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During the nine days leading up to Christmas Day, masses would include representations of Mary and Joseph. Following mass, there would be a party where people were blindfolded before hitting a piñata with a stick, a representation of faith defeating temptation with the help of virtue. The fruits and sweets that poured out of the piñata represented the joys of union with God.

5. At the beginning of a posada, people are divided in two groups, the ones “outside” representing Mary and Joseph, and the ones “inside” representing innkeepers.

Then everyone sings the posada litany together, re-enacting Mary and Joseph’s search, going back and forth until they are finally “admitted” to an inn. After this traditional part, the actual party starts. Posadas have spread to other countries — such as Guatemala, Ecuador, Colombia, and Venezuela; and the celebrations vary by location.

6. Piñatas are a quintessential part of posadas.

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Although they have mostly lost their original religious meaning, piñatas remain an essential part of las posadas. Mexico. Piñatas come in all shapes and sizes, but star shaped pinatas are the ones traditionally used in posadas. In fact, these star-shaped piñata’s 7 points represent the seven deadly sins. Most Mexicans are catholic and piñatas were a way to teach children about religion in a fun way. Piñatas represent being tempted by evil and the tradition of hitting them blindfolded symbolizes overcoming evil through blind faith.

7. Posadas are the occasion when moms and abuelas finally make the delicious ”Ponche Navideño” or Mexican Christmas Punch.

instagram @latino_in_chicago

A hot, flavorful drink that for many is synonymous with the holidays. Its ingredients vary from state to state, but it is traditionally prepared with tejocote (Mexican hawthorn), sugarcane, tamarind, apple, pear, guayaba, and cinnamon sticks. Some hosts will also offer their adult guests ponche con piquete – punch with a sting of alcohol, usually tequila or rum.

8. The posada litany is a traditional sung exchange that abuelas remember by heart and have passed down to younger generations since time immemorial.

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The traditional song which both “sides” of the reenactment sing while holding candles asking for ‘posada’ goes a little like this: “Eeeen el nombre del cieeeelo, ooos pido posaaaada (note the emphasis on the vowels, if you grew up singing these, you’ll know), pueees no puede andaaar mi esposa amada” (In the name of God I ask you for shelter for my beloved wife can’t go on) begin the Joseph and Mary group: the inne keepers reply denying them entry.

9. At the end of the litany, when the innkeeper finally decides to give Mary and Joseph a place to stay; both parties celebrate.

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As per tradition, the pilgrims carry colored candles and sparklers that symbolize the light that leads the way to the manger, and everyone gets to light sparklers in celebration at the end of the litany. After the litanies and the pilgrimage are over, everyone goes back to the house, where the real party starts.

10. The traditional “aguinaldo“ or ‘goodie bag’ that children get at Mexican birthday parties, originated from posadas.

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So they say, that thanks to Friar, Diego de Soria, the first posadas were celebrated in colonial Mexico around the year 1587. Back then, they used to celebrate “misas de aguinaldo” (Christmas mass), which were called like that because on these masses they offered a gift or Christmas box to the kids; this consisted of fruits, candies or toys. On the posadas the “aguinaldo” is represented by snacks, and even up to this day, kids can still expect a little aguinaldo at the end of the party.

11. Posadas were a means to convert indigenous peoples to Christianity.

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It’s said that posadas go all the way back to the time when the indigenous people celebrated during the winter or panquetzaliztli the advent of Huitzilopochtli, God of the War. For centuries, the Aztecs celebrated the birth of their god Huitzilopochtil around Christmas time. Huitzilopochtil was an important god of war who led the Aztec’s ancestors to the valley of mexico in what is now Mexico City.

Seeing the similarities between Christmas and Huitzilopochtil’s birth, Augustine priests were able to gradually convert the natives to Christianity. They realized that they couldn’t eradicate the holiday, but instead use it to gain new converts. This strategy also worked with Day of the Dead, as it was a former indigenous holiday turned catholic celebration coinciding with all saints day.

People Are Rooting For Romeo Santos To Make His Young Fan’s Dream Come True By Performing With Him

Entertainment

People Are Rooting For Romeo Santos To Make His Young Fan’s Dream Come True By Performing With Him

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Odali Ferreras is just 10-years-old but might be closer than ever to achieving his ultimate dream: playing a song with Dominican bachatero Romeo Santos. Well before Odali was featured in a video segment on Al Rojo Vivo earlier this week, Romeo Ferreras had posted a video to Instagram of the bachaterito strumming up a tune. On two separate occasions, Santos has posted videos of Odali singing, captioning one, “Dios Lo Bendiga” or “God Bless You.” The fact that little Odali is on Santos’ radar, along with his 17.1 million followers, is a feat in itself. That said, once we heard him perform, we knew the recognition was nothing but deserved. 

Santos’ fans are calling on the singer to make this little boy’s dreams come true. We’re with them.

Odali is so skilled that he can play the guitar with it behind his back.

CREDIT: AL ROJO VIVO / YOUTUBE

“Right now, my biggest dream is to play a song with Romeo Santos,” Odali told Al Rojo VivoIn Odali’s short little life, he’s mastered the guitar. He started playing when he was just 6 years old, which sounds young until you remember that he’s been playing music for just four years. At first, he played the piano, but when his piano broke, his father made a fateful decision. “I gave him my guitar and taught him the basics,” his father told the outlet.

Ever since, Odali has been devoted to Romeo Santos’ música. “It’s that Romeo is a complete artist, who sings with a lot of feeling. And I like his style,” Odali told Listín Diario. While Romeo Santos is his favorite artist, he’s also a fan of Anthony Santos, Frank Reyes, and El Chaval, according to the outlet. Odali has long felt emotionally boosted by Santos. Santos commented on a video of Odali singing “Yo Me Quedo,” wishing God’s blessings on the young boy during a time when his mother was very sick. 

Odali’s mother died just four months ago, prompting him to sing his own version of Santos’ “Mi Madre Querida.”

CREDIT: @ODALIFERRERAS / INSTAGRAM

His mother tragically died of a severe case of pneumonia. As he started singing the words, “mi madre querida,” he got choked up but kept strumming. Eventually, he belted out the next verse. Odali told the Al Rojo Vivo reporter that he hopes his love for music will one day help financially support his widowed father and little sister, Odaliza. By continuing to sing, Odali would be living out his mother’s wishes, as she was a huge supporter of Odali. She was still trying to teach him to dance merengue when she died. Odali’s father says that music has been a great source of comfort for his son. “We are going to church, where he sings, and the company of his guitar has given him strength to continue,” his father told Listín Diario.

Little Odali has his own Instagram account, managed by his father, and when he noticed that Romeo Santos shared a video of Odali to the gram about four months ago, he responded. “Good afternoon Mr. Romeo Santos,” Odali (or his father) commented. “I would like to meet you one day when you come to the DR and play a song with you if God allows.”

Fans are calling on Romeo Santos to give Odali a little Christmas miracle at the end of a heartbreaking year.

CREDIT: @ROMEOSANTOS / INSTAGRAM

“My tears came out, *wao*, keep it up!” commented Cristian Fernandez. “We can make your dream happen and also study, future star!” “Help him Romeo,” one Instagram user comments on Santos’ post. “Lost his mother and wants to help his father and little sister…I was very sad that his mother died.” Folks are tagging Romeo Santos all over the place, asking “Babe, please give the kid a chance, you’re his idol and all he wants is to sing a song with you!” Odali’s father took him to see Romeo Santos just last week in La Vega, and was hoping to “even say hello,” according to Listín Diario.

“I would like to study music,” little Odali told Listín Diario, “but we have no money and here in Constance there is nowhere to study it, but I would love to be able to become a great artist like Romeo, with that style he has. I love his new songs.” Keep going for it, Odali. You’re all our teacher.

READ: Romeo Santos Became First Latinx Artist To Headline MetLife Stadium And The Latino Gang Was Their To Celebrate