Culture

His Parents Gave Him A Dream Come True With His Very Own Costco Birthday Party And We Have Serious FOMO

We all know the wonders of Costco. Everything you might ever need is available in mass. Who doesn’t love buying three gallons of salsa and pounds of tortilla chips? Well, one little boy named Armando took it to the next level by hosting a birthday party at the Costco in Norwalk, California. The Costco location closed its food court to host the little man’s special birthday. This is one of the greatest things you will see on the internet today and you’re welcome.

Armando knew that his fourth birthday could only take place at one place: Costco.

Credit: armando_loves_costco / Instagram

Like, OMG! How did we not get invited to this party? So many people have memories of wandering around Costco with mami y papi for hours. Obviously, the best part of the trips was always free samples everywhere.

Of course, he had his own Costco employee outfit because, duh.

Credit: armando_loves_costco / Instagram

Legit, this is the greatest Halloween costume in case you need some inspo. Everyone will recognize you and Costco fans will love it. If you have any costume contests coming up, give this a try.

Every party guest got a very special name tag.

Credit: armando_loves_costco / Instagram

It is important to pay attention to details and this family spared no expense when it came to celebrating their little man’s special day.

The party included some fun and challenging activities, like guessing the price of items in Costco.

A true test of knowledge and appreciation. Who thinks they would be able to win this game? Costco is one of the greatest establishments for Latino families. We know we all have big families and Costco has been a lifesaver for us.

Of course, there was a piñata.

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Broke my custom @costco piñata ????????

A post shared by Armando E. Martinez (@armando_loves_costco) on

That’s right. They bought Armando a custom Costco piñata and we are all screaming. What a treasure for this boy. And, tbh, this family seems a lot nicer about letting him hit the piñata than ours were.

Just look at how happy all of the party guests are celebrating at Costco.

Credit: armando_loves_costco / Instagram

Looks like the conga line is still a thing, folks. No matter how long it’s been since we had a birthday party like this, the conga line will never die.

Now, Armando is not a fair-weather Costco fan.

Credit: armando_loves_costco

His Instagram account is named after his love for the chain store. He clearly likes to spend time at his local Costco and his love for the store is something we can all relate to.

Like, he would clearly make it home if he could.

Credit: armando_loves_costco / Instagram

Literally, same. There is nothing you can’t find at Costco and this little one is already years ahead of his peers with his appreciation of the bulk store.

Happy birthday, Armando!

Credit: armando_loves_costco / Instagram

This is one birthday party everyone should be talking about.

READ: An Instagram Influencer And Actress Threw A Mexican-Themed Birthday For Her Daughter And Her Fans Are Divided

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How Kwanzaa Was Created To Celebrate And Honor African American Culture

Culture

How Kwanzaa Was Created To Celebrate And Honor African American Culture

If it’s odd or foreign for you to hear Kwanzaa mentioned in conversations about the holidays, 2020 might be a time to read up about it.

Sure, with its origins in the Black Power and Civil Rights movement, the holiday is pretty new in comparison to other December holidays like Christmas and Hanukkah. But with so many of its traditions based on the celebration of individuals with African roots, 2020 ought to be the year you consider contemplating the importance of Kwanzaa particularly because of its celebration of African American communities and those across the world with links to Africa. 

Particularly because 2020 has seen so much attention being poured over the Black community for the first time amidst protests and calls for justice.

Unlike other holidays in December Kwanzaa is not centered on commercialism and embraces Black power.

Only a small portion of the African American population actually celebrates Kwanzaa. And unlike the other holidays it stands next to Kwanzaa is grounded rooted in recognizing the diaspora. According to The Guardian, “Kwanzaa (literally, “Harvest,”) is a seven-day commemoration and call to action innovated by Dr Maulana Ron Karenga in 1966. That Kwanzaa was born amidst social and cultural unrest – as both segregation ended and urban unrest in reaction to poverty and police brutality sparked rebellion – should speak volumes to us 48 years later. Kwanzaa is organized around seven days of reflection and action based on the Nguzo Saba (the Seven Principles).”

The principles include Umoja (Unity), Kujichagulia (Self-Determination), Ujima (Collective Work and Responsibility), Ujamaa (Cooperative Economics), Nia (Purpose), Kuumba (Creativity), and Imani (Faith).”

The holiday draws on familiar holiday tropes including candle lighting and meals. Sometimes even gift-giving.

As The Guardian notes, “it also occurs at the time of year that was once the only full respite allowed enslaved blacks – a time that usually coincided with the end of the harvest.”

Kwanzaa is a holiday that celebrates the power and endurance of the Black community. Unlike the other December holidays, it also encourages those who take part to reflect on the struggles and successes of the Balck community in particular. And not just for those who are African American. Communities of color across the globe are standing up for Black people and defending their humanity. Kwanzaa is another way to remember that #BlackLivesMatter and to embrace and celebrate the movement, its history, and its victories as well.

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Costco Pulls Chaokoh Coconut Milk Off the Shelves After the Brand Is Accused of Using Forced Monkey Labor

Things That Matter

Costco Pulls Chaokoh Coconut Milk Off the Shelves After the Brand Is Accused of Using Forced Monkey Labor

If you’re planning on buying Chaokoh coconut milk on your next trip to Costco, it’s best you look elsewhere. The wholesale giant has reportedly stopped stocking the Thailand-manufactured product due to allegations of forced monkey labor.

You read that right. USA Today reported that Costco expressed concern over Chaokoh’s labor practices after they were made aware of some upsetting accusations.

PETA alleges that monkeys are (often illegally) taken from their families in the wild and kept “chained” and “isolated” on “barren dirty farms” in Thailand where they have little opportunity to interact with their own kind. An investigator recorded upsetting footage.

The footage shows monkeys chained and caged in cramped quarters. One yanks on its cage, ostensibly trying to escape. The monkey are let out to climb trees and pick coconuts–sometimes up to 400 per day– and afterwards, they are once again confined to cages.

The coconuts they pick are used for the production of coconut milk, oils, yogurt, and other coconut-based products. While there, one of the workers told the PETA investigator that they supply their coconuts to Chaokoh.

While Costco will not publicly comment on the matter, USA Today obtained a letter a Costco executive wrote to PETA about the allegations.

“We have ceased purchasing from our supplier/owner of the brand Chaokoh,” wrote Ken Kimble, Costco’s vice president and general merchandise manager, in a letter dated September 29th.

Kimble added: “We have made it clear to the supplier that we do not support the use of monkeys for harvesting and that all harvesting must be done by human labor. In turn, our supplier has contractually required the same of all its suppliers. In addition, our supplier is in the process of visiting every one of its supplier farms to communicate the harvest policies.”

Although PETA has obtained footage of the monkey labor practices, the manufacturer of Chaokoh says they have conducted an internal audit of 64 farms out of 817 farms they source from. According to them, they “did not find the use of monkey for coconut harvesting.” They even presented USA Today with a 14-page document entitled the “Monkey-Free Coconut Due Diligence Assessment”.

Costco is not the only retail chain that stopped supplying Chaokoh. Walgreens, Duane Reade, ShopRite and Smart & Final are no longer selling the coconut milk brand due to the alleged animal abuse practices. Meanwhile, Target, Walmart, and Kroger still have the brand listed on their websites.

According to PETA, Thailand is the primary country that employs monkey-labor practices. Other coconut-heavy regions like Brazil, Colombia, and Hawaii use humane methods.

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