Culture

Topo Chico Is Being Rolled Out Nationwide Because Coke Is Trying To Get Into The Sparkling Water Game

It’s safe to say that sparkling water is having a moment. Whether it’s LaCroix or Pepsi’s new sparkling water, Bubly, it’s hard to miss the fizzy drink sensation that has taken over mini-fridges and supermarkets across the country. Now it seems that Coke wants to capitalize on the trend and cash in on fizzy drink craze.

Their secret weapon is Topo Chico, a drink that is sourced from a limestone spring concealed under a mountain in northeastern Mexico. The drink was built on a legend of the thermal waters of the Cerro del Topo Chico, which is where the drink got its name. The story goes that the hidden spring water cured an Aztec princess’ illness. While there’s no way to verify the myth, Topo Chico indeed does come from the same underground spring since 1895.

Coke is rolling out Topo Chico nationally. However, many are asking, will it lose its soul in the process?

Credit: @tictoc / Twitter

While the brand has been mostly known in northern Mexico and a handful of U.S. states, it’s already carved out a niche market that has made it a cult favorite in places like Austin, Texas. Popular for it’s “throwback image” and cool design, Topo Chico has seen massive growth, over the last year U.S. sales jumped 39 percent to nearly $130 million, according to data from IRI, a Chicago-based market research firm.

This could be credited to Coke’s $220 million purchase of the brand two years ago. While Topo Chico was originally owned by Arca, the second-biggest Coca-Cola bottler in Latin America, it’s still in charge on bottling the drink in Mexico. The company has also invested close to $42 million into production and operation to satisfy growing customer demand since Coke acquired the brand. 

Many saw Coke’s purchase of the brand as a way for the beverage company to enter the growing sparkling water business or rather match up with Pepsi’s popular new drink, Bubly. Since being launched a little over a year ago, Bubly has been a leader in sales and in growth as the company has put the drink in vending machines across the country. It’s even taken on popular millennial brand, LaCroix. Yet, Coke entering the sparkling water game could change the playing field entirely. 

The purchase of Topo Chico didn’t come without a bit of resistance from long-time customers and locals who love the brand.

 Credit: @topochico / Twitter

Topo Chico has deep roots in the Southwest part of the U.S. and in Mexico. So when Coke got involved, things got a little personal between fans of the drink and the giant soda company. Whether that was due to the increased price of the drink or just simply not giving money to a giant corporate entity like Coke, there was boycotts and some anger from Texans. 

Ramon Maraboto, who oversees the Topo plant for Arca, told Bloomberg that Coke needs to be wary of rolling out the beloved drink and not losing sight of what makes it special. That uniqueness and the original look are what made the fizzy drink so beloved among fans.

“Coca-Cola is aware they’re buying a brand that needs to be taken care of,” Maraboto said. “This brand has its own fingerprint.”

Keeping that mystique and coolness with the drink is one of Coke’s biggest challenges. That’s why the company is doing a small national rollout of the beverage with efforts to preserve some of that Mexican background and nostalgia that many love about Topo Chico. 

“We don’t want to lose that by putting it everywhere,” Chaly Moyen, who oversees Coke’s strategy in the U.S. and Canada, told Bloomberg

Don’t be surprised if you see a pack of Topo Chico at a grocery market near you soon.

Credit: @business / Twitter

Coke sees Topo Chico becoming the new “it” brand when it comes to sparkling water. According to Maraboto, Topo Chico sales in the U.S. could pass it’s own in Mexico in the next year. This is an example of that quick growth and advancement the drink has had in the quick two years under new ownership. 

Even in Pahoa, a town with a population of about 1,000 people located in the southeast corner of Hawaii’s Big Island, the Island Naturals Market & Deli has sold the drink for the past three months. Kai Sorte, the store’s manager, told Bloomberg that the drink is already among its top sellers. People can’t get enough of it and there seem to be no signs of slowing down. 

“It’s definitely picking up speed,” Sorte said.

READ: A Woman Threw A Lowrider-Themed Party For Her Son’s First Birthday And It’s Just Too Much For Our Hearts

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A Mexican Artist Is Making Pancake Art That’s Too Beautiful To Eat

Culture

A Mexican Artist Is Making Pancake Art That’s Too Beautiful To Eat

Social media is where people can show off just about anything they create. This includes art in any and all media, like pancake art. Claudia, the creator behind Nappan Pancake art, is the latest artist watching their art reach the masses.

Claudia, the artist behind Nappan Pancake art, got her start because of the pandemic.

The artist first started to play around with pancake art last spring break when the pandemic forced businesses and schools to close. Claudia wanted to get more creative with her kids’ breakfasts since they were now always at home.

“I started experimenting with making Pancake art,” Claudia recalls to mitú. “At first I only used the color of the natural dough and a little cocoa. At first, I just used the ketchup dispensers and little by little I learned.”

Claudia uses her pancake art to honor some truly iconic people.

@nappancakes

Responder a @detodoun_poco233 Cepillín ✨🥞✨ en nuestros ♥️ #parati #fy #HijosAdopTiktoks #adoptiktoks #viral #foryou @cepillintv #pancakeart ncakeart

♬ La Feria de Cepillin – Cepillín

Cepillín recently died and the loss was felt throughout the community. He made our lives joyous and fun with his music, especially his birthday song. Some of the creations are done for fans who request to see their faves turned into delicious pancake art.

The artist loves creating the edible works of art.

The journey of becoming a pancake artist has been a fun adventure for Claudia and her children. The more she has practiced, the more she has been able to do.

“Sometimes I scream with excitement and I go to all the members of my house to see it,” Claudia says about her successes. “Other times it’s just a feeling like “disappointment could be better” other times it just breaks or burns and then I just cry but it usually feels very satisfying.”

You can check out all of her creations on TikTok.

@nappancakes

Responder a @reyna100804santoyo siii🥞✨ díganle que me adopte 🥺 @ederbez #adoptiktoks #hijosadoptiktoks #parati #foryou #viral #fy #art #pancakeart

♬ Little Bitty Pretty One – Thurston Harris

With 350,000 followers and growing, it won’t be long until more people start to fully enjoy Claudia’s art. Her children can’t get enough of it and she is so excited to share it with the rest of the world.

READ: Spicy Food Lovers Have Reason To Celebrate As New Study Says Eating Chilies Could Be Secret To Longevity

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Viral Video Of Overworked Texas Dominos Workers Burdened By Snow Storm Goes Viral

Things That Matter

Viral Video Of Overworked Texas Dominos Workers Burdened By Snow Storm Goes Viral

Texas’s current power crisis from a devastating storm has disrupted power generation and frozen natural gas pipelines. The is historic storm has driven electric demand higher than the state has ever seen, but it’s not just electric energy being overextended as a result. It’s physical and mental human energy as well.

Recently, an image of two exhausted Domino’s Pizza workers went viral for showing the extreme exhaustion workers are experiencing.

In a post shared to News4sanantonio.com’s Chime In page a user by the name of July DeLuna explained “This Dominos in San Antonio. Working during this crisis. They had a weekend worth of food and it was gone within 4 hours. This team helped those that needed help. These are the essential workers that need recognition. They were the only pizza place open. Every pizza place was closed but dominos stayed open to help those in need.”

Little else is known about the exhausted workers in the viral image but it did rack up over 8K comments within hours of being posted.

“Dominoes better pay them for the shifts they’ll miss while they don’t have any ingredients. With this practical free advertising it’s the least they could do. Otherwise these kind people worked themselves out of already bad hourly pay,” one user commented.

“,As someone who works in the food service industry, the thought of selling out of all product in only four hours and how much work goes in to preparing that much food is unfathomable levels of nightmare fuel,” another noted.

In another response to the image, a Reddit user wrote “I cannot express to you how upsetting it is to be the only food source open during hard times, to still be open and show up to do your job with higher than normal levels of orders, and still get yelled at by management for not having orders out within a window of time.”

Images of overworked and stressed is nothing new of course.

Fast-food workers are often burdened by their field’s daily challenges. In 2020, food industry workers are being forced to endure customer abuse at even higher rates. Last year a TikTok video of a Subway restaurant falling asleep while in the middle of making a sandwich went viral.

“This is actually really sad. I can’t imagine how underslept she is. Not to mention the wage people get paid at Subway… She deserves better,” one TikTok user by the name of Monique Emilia commented at the time. The skincare influencer Hyram also commented writing “Poor thing… Can’t imagine how underslept she is, we’re too hard on service workers.”

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