culture

Cholo Scar Calls His Dad To Get His Famous Birria Recipe And Their Bond Is The Sweetest, Most Unexpected Thing Ever

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There is something so comforting and soothing about a hot bowl of birria in the middle of summer. Yeah. That’s right. We are talking about a steam bowl of chiles based soup in the middle of the hottest part of the year and we have no shame about it. Everyone is always joking about how our parents make us eat soup in the summer but the joke is really us becoming adults and making soup over the summer.

Birria is traditionally made with goat meat or carne de cabra but this recipe takes a page out of our convenience-based economy and uses some choice beef. What really makes this soup so unique and delicious is the use of the chiles to make the broth for the soup. The chiles used in the broth really gives the soup a special and hearty kick without overpowering your senses.

While some purist might think foods should always be prepared the same way doesn’t understand the true versatility of food. Cooking is about experimenting and creating things out of what you like. For some, goat meat is too gamey or tough making beef a perfect substitute. For those cutting out red meat, you can always try the dish with some chicken or any meat substitute that you might desire.

Soups are a universal dish. Every culture has a soup that hold some of the most iconic vegetables and meats of a region combined to create comfort food. These dishes are a great way to look into someone else culture. By tasting and exploring a soup, you can see the kinds of foods that bring people of that culture warmth, comfort, and tastes of home. If you think about it long enough, you will be able to point directly to a soup that you grew up with that is a representation of your culture and childhood in a bowl.

Ingredients:

  • 10 pounds of chuck roast beef cut into cubes
  • 1 pound of dried guajillo chiles, washed and dried
  • 1/2 pound of dried chiles de arbol, washed and dried
  • 1 bunch of cilantro, chopped
  • 1 garlic clove
  • 1 tomatillo
  • 2 tablespoons of chicken stock powder
  • 2 onions, one cut in quarters and one diced
  • 1 bunch of radishes, sliced thin
  • 3-4 bay leaves, depending on the size you are preparing

Directions:

  1. Fill a heavy bottom pot with water and bring to a boil. Add the beef to the water and let boil for about 3 hours. Check after 2 hours. The beef should be cooked enough that it starts to fall apart when you stick a fork in it.
  2. In another post, fill halfway with water and bring to a simmer. Slowly add the guajillo chiles, chiles de arbol, the quartered onion, the whole tomatillo, and the chicken broth powder. Raise heat and bring the water to a rolling boil. Once the water hits a boil, turn off the heat and cover for 30 minutes so it starts to cool down but continues to cook the ingredients without the boiling water.
  3. After the water has cooled down for 30 minutes, add the chiles, onion, tomatillo, and some reserved water to a blender. Pulse the blender until the chile mixture is smooth.
  4. Set a fine mesh sieve over a mixing bowl and pour the chile mixture into the sieve in batches so it doesn’t spill. Using the back of a spoon, press the child mixture through the so all you have in the bowl in a smooth liquid.
  5. In a sauté pan, add the cooked beef and the salsa you made. Cook over medium-low heat until the beef starts to shred on its own.
  6. Once the beef is ready, put some beef in serving bowls and cover with the salsa broth you made. Add the cilantro, diced onion, and sliced radish on top and serve while hot. Make sure everyone has a nice cold glass of horchata and some warmed tortillas to really make the meal a treat and enjoy this delicious dish.

Here's Why Texas Takes Up Such An Important Place In The History Of Juneteenth And The Abolition Movement

Culture

Here’s Why Texas Takes Up Such An Important Place In The History Of Juneteenth And The Abolition Movement

@Teaacup_ / Twitter

For those of you unaware, Juneteenth is the holiday that officially commemorates the abolishment of slavery in America. While the Emancipation Proclamation was signed over two years earlier, we celebrate Juneteenth because it’s the day Texas finally complied with the law and informed slaves they were free.

Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation on September 22, 1862, made effective beginning January 1, 1863.

@DailyLimbaugh / Twitter

Back in the late 1800s, word traveled slowly. When the Civil War was won, it took over two months for Confederate soldiers to hear that Robert E. Lee surrendered. Other more sinister and likely theories are that slaveowners kept the news a secret for as long as possible, and/or someone actually killed the messenger sent by the Federal government to relay the news.

Thirty months later, Galveston Island, Texas, was the last town in America that was illegally enslaving African Americans.

@TexasSierraClub / Twitter

General Gordon Granger and his cohort of Union soldiers had been traveling the South for two years to spread the word that slaves were freed. His last stop was Galveston Island, on June 19th, 1865.

The story has it that the freed slaves left before Granger finished his announcement.

@DellaSeattle / Twitter

Droves of freed African-Americans fled Texas to find more welcoming (northern) parts of the U.S. While Juneteenth is the day we celebrate freedom, slavery never ended. There were several reports of slave owners deliberately waiting to free their slaves until after the harvest.

In a way, Juneteenth commemorates what we all already know to be true: justice delayed for Black and brown folks is somehow worth celebrating.

When freed slaves tried to celebrate Juneteenth a year later, Jim Crow laws were already in effect.

@andrew_k_q / Twitter

There were no public places they could use. A group of freed slaves in Houston pooled $800 to purchase what is now called “Emancipation Park.” For seventy more years, it would be the only public park and swimming pool open to African-Americans in Houston.

The Mascogos, often called the Black Seminoles, live and celebrate Juneteenth in Coahuila, Mexico.

@Tolerance_org / Twitter

The origin of this group is difficult to pinpoint. Some say they were African slaves of the Florida Seminole tribe and fled to Mexico, where they made alliances with local indigenous groups. Others say that they were freed slaves who lived among the Florida Seminole tribes as equals and created their own community.

Every year, what’s left of the community celebrates Juneteenth in full regalia.

Texas was the first state to recognize Juneteenth as a state-wide holiday.

@dstinc1913 / Twitter

When Barack Obama was a Senator, he co-sponsored legislation to make Juneteenth a national holiday. He continued that fight into his presidency, but it never passed.

To this day, it’s shocking how many folks pass by Juneteenth and look to July 4th as a celebration of freedom.

@daja_harrell / Twitter

If Fannie Lou Hammer was right in saying “nobody’s free until everybody’s free,” then America’s founding ain’t the day to celebrate. Juneteenth put an end to the repulsive founding of America–built on the backs of Black men and women.

Juneteenth is both a day of celebration and resistance of modern-day slavery.

@HuffPost / Twitter

Over 150 years later, no meaningful reparations have been made to the descendants of slaves. The effects of slavery and Jim Crow live on in our laws as our country legally throws descendants of slaves into prison, into underfunded schools, and are legally murdered by police at disproportionate rates. One in every 13 African Americans has been stripped of the right to vote because of felony disenfranchisement laws. White supremacy reigns.

Black America, we are with you.

@merelynora / Twitter

Juneteenth is a day more Americans should celebrate. July 4th is a holiday that will always symbolize the freedom of the nation from the ruling of England. However, Juneteenth is when the nation decided to end the cruel and horrible act of slavery.

READ: Vogue Brazil Style Director Resigns After Hosting A “Slavery” Party

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