Culture

Big Pun’s Son Responds To Media’s ‘Misinterpretation’ That His Song Is About Dad’s Domestic Abuse

Rapper Chris Rivers released this song that has some rap fans upset.

The song “Fear of My Crown” is a new song by Chris Rivers, the son of one of hip hop’s greatest lyricists of all time, Big Pun. The music video for the song features several instances of abuse. One that stands out is an abusive father performing some heinous acts of domestic violence against his wife and son. The video culminates with the boy fighting back.

Many have speculated that the song and video were specifically about Chris Rivers’ relationship with his father.

Big Pun is often listed in many “top five rappers of all time” lists. The Puerto Rican rapper from the Bronx was larger than life in more ways than one. Lyrically he was a monster. And he was also, and this is not a scientific term, huge. The man wasn’t called Big Pun for nothing. At the end of his life he weighed close to 700 lbs. He tragically rapped “I just lost a hundred pounds, I ain’t going nowhere” in the song “It’s So Hard,” which released two months after his passing.

Big Pun left behind a legacy of dope songs, many of which featured him talking tough about kicking ass and shooting guns. Standard stuff for the late 90’s. But rumors did circulate about his alleged domestic abuse issues after his passing, with many fans rejecting the idea or saying it was either too soon or wrong to speak ill of the dead. His wife Liza Rios begged to differ.

In an E! interview, Big Pun’s wife spoke candidly about his abuse and even had footage of him hitting her with a gun.

She proceed to pull a shotgun on him. This probably wasn’t the first or last time the violence occurred. It obviously influenced Chris Rivers’ growing up in the household.

Although Pun and his wife had this history, Chris Rivers took to Facebook to address speculation by fans and the frustration the video caused many of them.

The intentions of the video was to raise the general awareness of domestic violence and nothing more . The story in the video was no way a depiction of my story or my father in any way , but the basic cycle of abuse. This was meant to be an empowering video for people who has been through this and a voice for kids and the people who has suffered and on that note it’s been very helpful to thousands of people who has been touched by it. Even the people hitting me personally thanking me for speaking up and giving them the courage to face their own past and grow from it. Unfortunately the media spun it and has been targeting and demonizing my pops off of it. Their misinterpretation of the entire premise is drastic and I️ hate to see my father who was a great man who did many great things, not only for hip hop but for his community and loved ones , be marginalized into a bad person because people wanna focus on one thing. I️ as his son have long forgiven any and all things from my childhood and see him as a great man. My family also. And if we can see that then others should as well. He was abused as a child and went through so much as well as had many demons which he struggled with in his life that he needed help for. It’s hard to not idolize someone so great but he was a human at the end of the day and did his best to overcome his tribulations. If you isolate one section of anyone, you can Paint a picture of a villain but viewing the man as a whole , he has his flaws as well as his incredible nature and I’m nothing but proud of him and love him dearly. It’s important to break the cycle and to not be ignorant about all parties involved and reach to a solution opposed to playing the blame game . I️ want this video to empower and bring awareness. To bring voice to the silenced and bring courage to the oppressed. I️ love each of you. I️ just want you to love yourselves. #DragonGod #DragonsUp #IFeelAwesome #YouShouldToo #SpicJames #SexSymbol #AlmostCool #LoveIsLove

Posted by Chris Rivers on Thursday, November 9, 2017

In his Facebook post he made sure to say to write that yes, bad things happened, but that’s not what the song and video were about. He wrote that the song’s intention “was to raise the general awareness of domestic violence and nothing more.” He further went on to explain:

“Unfortunately the media spun it and has been targeting and demonizing my pops off of it. Their misinterpretation of the entire premise is drastic and I️ hate to see my father who was a great man who did many great things, not only for hip hop but for his community and loved ones, be marginalized into a bad person because people wanna focus on one thing. I️ as his son have long forgiven any and all things from my childhood and see him as a great man. My family also. And if we can see that then others should as well. He was abused as a child and went through so much as well as had many demons which he struggled with in his life that he needed help for.”

The song is part of his upcoming album “Deloreon.”


READ: Lin-Manuel Miranda Coaching A Rapping Gina Rodriguez Is Everything


Recommend this story to a friend by clicking on the share button below.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Mare Advertencia Lirika’s Rap Game Is An Ode To Social Resistance

Fierce

Mare Advertencia Lirika’s Rap Game Is An Ode To Social Resistance

In Oaxaca, Mexico the hip-hop scene is dominated by men. Influenced by early ’90s American rap artists, most lyrics are misogynistic; a commonality in past and present wrap.

As a feminist uprising fuels the country, female rappers like Mare Advertencia Lirika utilize the depth hip-hop activism can have on social justice.

Growing up listening to banda, Lirika became exposed to American hip-hop when she was 12.

Although a fan, her language barrier impacted her resonance with the genre. After hearing Mexican rap groups like Caballeros de Plan G and Vieja Guardia, her spark for rap reignited.

“The history of rap is a mix of so many things that it gives room for anyone to fit into it,” she told Refinery29.

At 16, her rap career took off.

Under a machismo culture where women are often told ‘calladita te ves más bonita,’ Lirika defies outdated standards.

In her latest feminist anthem “Que Mujer,” she encourages women to rise up against patriarchal rhetorics.

With passion and prowess, her bona fide representation of class and gender struggles echo marginalized communities disenfranchised by systems of power.

Femicide rates in Mexico are rampant, having doubled in the last five years. On average 10 women are killed every day, but due to unreliable data and systematic impunity, many cases go under-investigated.

Oaxaca is a hot spot for violence, a reality Lirika knows too well. When she was five, her father was murdered resulting in the circumstantial feminist upbringing that fueled her vocality. Raised by her mother, grandmother and aunts, witnessing women take charge in making tough decisions helped to normalize her outspokenness.

Her feminist upbringing made her the strong woman she is today.

Identifying as Zapotec, an indigenous community native to Oaxaca, Lirika’s potent lyrics pay homage to her matriarchal upbringing and social resistance.

In “¿Y Tú Qué Esperas?” Lirika’s hearty alto sound shines as she asks that women speak and live their truth.

In songs like “Se Busca” she renders a poignant message demanding the return of those who have been kidnapped. Her visuals further amplify the severity of the issue as she raps, “cada persona que no está es un ausencia que no sana.”

Unafraid of confrontation, her cutthroat verses and poeticism are visceral.

Listening to her beats feel reminiscent of old-school rap, making it almost impossible to not nod along to her intellectual wit. Fusing the melodies of cumbias and reggae among others, she spits bars that sound the alarm of revolution.

But hostility towards women in the Oaxaca rap scene still lingers.

“Most people still think that women aren’t compatible with rap and think that we are wasting our time,” she told The New York Times in 2018. “We have to continue to show up at shows because it gives us confidence to see other women rap and to show people that we can also do this.”

Perhaps one of the best known Oaxaca rappers Lirika, 34, has established herself as a prominent figure in the genre. But her call to action is just beginning.

“My life context has taught me that I can use my voice,” she told Refinery29. “And maybe that’s a privilege of mine, one I shouldn’t have, but I trust very much what I have to say. I don’t fear what I have to say.”

READ: Latinas Talk About Learning Of The Heartbreaking Colonization Of Indigenous Land And The Genocide Of Its People

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

There’s A Fake Beauty Site For People To Report Domestic Violence While “Shopping”

Fierce

There’s A Fake Beauty Site For People To Report Domestic Violence While “Shopping”

Since the start of the pandemic, many communities have seen an increase in the amount of domestic violence reports. With more people staying at home under stay-at-home orders, many have been unable to escape their abusers. This has led to an increased need for resources for domestic assault victims.

Well, one teenager has thought up a pretty ingenious way to get that help into the hands of those who need it in a very discreet way.

Teen launches fake beauty site to help victims of domestic violence.

A teenager who was aware of the increase in domestic violence since the start of the pandemic, has taken it into her own hands to help out victims. She’s launched a resource for domestic assault victims disguised as a fake beauty site. The Facebook page called “Rumianki i Bratki” (Chamomiles and Pansies) allows victims to stuck in their homes to seek help.

“I heard about a French initiative, where people go to the pharmacy and ask for a special mask that lets the pharmacist know they are a victim of domestic violence,” Paszko said in an interview with the BBC. “I thought it was a brilliant idea, so I came up with the idea of selling cosmetics.”

Translated from Polish, the description of the Facebook page reads: “Chamomiles and Pansies is a store with natural cosmetics. We will help you with the purchase of the appropriate specifics, as well as with all other problems.” There are a total of nine products listed on the page, and each has a description detailing how the product can help.

The Facebook page offers a variety of services depending on what the victim is comfortable with.

When someone messages Chamomiles and Pansies inquiring about a face cream, they’re assisted by a psychologist posing as a salesperson. Using Facebook Chat, the psychologist is able to collect essential information. The psychologist can then send authorities to visit the home if the domestic abuse victim chooses to place an order and leave an address.

When Paszko first launched the site, she thought it would only reach her friends and extended family, but the BBC reported that more than 350 people have contacted the website. Since the initiative took off, Paszko has enlisted the help of the Center For Women’s Rights, a Polish nonprofit. It currently has over 22,000 likes.

Cases of domestic violence have been on the rise since the start of the pandemic.

More than 10 million women and men experience violence from an intimate partner  every year, according to the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence based in Colorado. The National Domestic Violence Hotline reported a 9%  increase in emergency calls from March through May last year when many states issued lockdown orders. Police departments have reported increases of domestic violence cases around the country including 18% in San Antonio, 22% in Portland and 10% in New York City, according to the American Journal of Emergency Medicine.

If you are experiencing domestic violence in the United States and need help you can go to TheHotline.org to chat with someone or call 1-800-799-SAFE (7233).

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com