Entertainment

New Study Says The 52 Minutes We Spend Gossiping A Day Is Actually Good For The Soul

Let’s keep it real. We all live for some gossip.

And a new study has found that each of us spends on average nearly an hour spilling the tea, each and every day.

But guess what? Although most assume that gossip is nothing but trash talk, according to the study, the vast majority is nonjudgemental chit chat.  

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According to the study, nearly 75% of all the gossip we share is neutral. Apparently, most of us really do spend our days talking about how our mamis make the best pozole or how our best friend’s tia just got back from a trip to the Bahamas. I didn’t realize we were all so boring.

About 15% of our gossip is actual trash talking though. We’ve all heard the whispers.

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Though according to the study, even negative gossip can serve a helpful purpose, especially in the workplace.

I mean imagine you find out your co-workers are talking sh*t about how you’re always late. You’re probably gonna want to change your actions, arrive to work on time, and gladly tell them to shut the f-up. Right?

I don’t know about you, but I’m relieved to discover it’s not so bad to gossip considering many of us basically grew up on chisme.

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Like, Latino culture is letting you sit with the grown-ups to hear all the family gossip once you’re old enough.

And some of us find that special someone just to share the chisme with.

Like if this isn’t me and everyone I know.

The study also pointed out something I think few of us are actually surprised by.

Credit: @me_kimba / Twitter

Consider another misogynistic myth disproved: women don’t share more negative gossip than men. All good ammunition the next time someone tries to tell you that women are intrinsically bitchy, or female friendships thrive on cattiness, or one of the many other desperately worn-out stereotypes about women.

Like for real though….

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Men engage in just as much gossip as women do. So now if your papi, novio, or hermano tell you to stop with all the chisme, well now you’ve got the ultimate clap back.

Excuse me, while I pretend to be shocked.

Few of us with any men in our lives are surprised by this so-called revelation.

Another misconception about gossip is that it’s something only the younger generation does but this study proves that chisme knows no age.

Credit: @valqueso / Twitter

I mean we all knew this already. The señoras who go to church and then lunch at each other’s houses are the OGs of gossip. Though the study did point out that the younger you are the more likely you are to engage in negative trash-talking gossip.

So the study points out that we spend 52 minutes every day talking about someone who isn’t around. But I mean it’s pretty obvious why.

People just want to connect, talk and share. They’re less keen on being mean about someone else than just trying to fit in.

This is remarkably hopeful for humanity as a whole and for office life in particular. Especially when you realize how much time we spend dishing out the chisme.

Don’t forget to check out our “Chismosas 4 Life” keychain set to spoil your best chisme buddy.

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READ: If You Are A Chismosa, You Definitely Know These 9 Stages Of Chisme

Vogue México Put A Spanish Music Artist On Their Cover And Called Her Latina And Latinos Almost Set Twitter On Fire

Entertainment

Vogue México Put A Spanish Music Artist On Their Cover And Called Her Latina And Latinos Almost Set Twitter On Fire

It seems the difference between “Latinx” and “Hispanic” continues to confuse the masses where both terms are incorrectly used interchangeably to describe the collective Spanish speaking community. This time the controversy comes with the reveal of Spanish flamenco artist Rosalía on the cover of Vogue México, as the face for their list of  “20 artistas latinos.”

If you were alive over the weekend, then you likely caught the Twitter backlash that criticized Vogue for its latest faux pas.

For its latest cover, Vogue México recently featured Rosalía for an issue that headlined a group of “20 artistas latinos.

Rosalía, again, is not Latino. The artist was born in Catalonia, Spain and while she has collaborated with Latino artists like J Balvin, she is– again– not Latino. Vogue’s cultural flub is a reminder that as much of a rising influence as Latino artistry and culture continues to be, the nuances of our culture and history remain in the blindspots of many consumers. And yes, even of Vogue México’s, a media giant, that has made great strides to improve the diversity on its pages in recent years, particularly with features of minority women like Mexican indigenous actress Yalitza Aparicio. 

Latinx Twitter was quickly ablaze with comments reminding people of the correct usage: “Latinx” is for Latin America, “Hispanic” is reserved for those from Spain. 

But beyond the literal distinctions, the term “Hispanic” is loaded with ties to colonial history between Latin America and Spain. Starting in the 1500s, what was then known as “New Spain” (colonized areas including Latin America) led to the massacres of indigenous communities or forced assimilation to Spanish culture. Additionally, diseases wiped out a large portion of the population leading to mortality rates as high as 90 percent throughout Latin America.   

In short, despite the fact that Rosalía speaks Spanish, calling her Latina is culturally insensitive and grossly inaccurate.

Rosalía herself discussed the difference during an interview with Fader in May 2019 saying “If Latin music is music made in Spanish, then my music is part of Latin music. But I do know that if I say I’m a Latina artist, that’s not correct, is it?” The singer, who makes music inspired by Andalusian flamenco culture, clarified that she’s “part of a generation that’s making music in Spanish” and suggested that others should decide if she should be included in a modern definition of what “Latin” music sounds like.

In the interview, she addressed how the term is used loosely in the media though the article does mention the controversy she sparked after saying she felt “Latina” when she traveled to places like Mexico. 

Since the Vogue México cover is in Spanish it can be translated to “Latin Artists” referring to Spanish music overall.

However, due to the sensitive nature of the terminology, it’s important to take the opportunity to highlight the importance of the distinction. 

This isn’t the first instance in entertainment where the distinction needed to be made. Recently, One Day at a Time creator Gloria Calderón Kellett tweeted about how she needed to clarify that the writer she’d been sent was Hispanic not Latinx

She then tweeted a chart created by Bustle to provide a visual interpretation of the differences between “Latinx” and “Hispanic.” 

The music industry as a whole has yet to adopt this vocabulary and properly use it and the uproar is not on the spotlight placed on Rosalía but rather the fact that there are plenty of indie Latinx artists who deserve attention. 

Rosalía is a five-time Latin Grammy nominee who came out with El Mal Querer in November of last year.  She spoke with Billboard about the Andulasian influence in her neighborhood growing up that sparked her love for flamenco since the folkloric music has its origins in that community in Southern Spain. 

“That folklore is part of who I am, and that’s the key: I don’t want to lose my roots. I think that’s what gives you your identity. Rather than trying to adhere to some kind of global pop standard, it’s much more interesting to look to my roots and to the popular music of where I’m from. Not now or ever will I put flamenco aside,” she told the publication. 

Though her last album was an ode to flamenco, she has explored other more contemporary sounds and collaborated with Latinx artists include J Balvin, who is from Colombia. Their reggaeton track was a global hit providing an opportunity for a distinction to be made between the way they could’ve been identified but that wasn’t necessarily the case. 

Even well known Spanish artists like Enrique Iglesias and Alejandro Sanz are often referred to as Latino/Latinx artists. Yet, even the U.S. census has been identifying people of Spanish descent using “Hispanic” as a catchall term since 1980. In neither instance was the word used properly and the vocabulary continues to evolve now that the gender-inclusive term Latinx has become the preferred identifier for younger generations. 

While Rosalía’s music is worthy of attention and praise, it’s important to note that, like Portugal and Brazil, Spain and Spanish-speaking countries in Latin America are two distinct cultures that shouldn’t be conflated. If English artists and Americans can be identified as such and not grouped together solely based on language, it’s not much to ask that distinctions be made when it comes to “Latinx” versus “Hispanic.” 

This Video Of People In Japan Dancing To Bachata And Merengue Proves That Latino Music Really Is Taking Over The World

Entertainment

This Video Of People In Japan Dancing To Bachata And Merengue Proves That Latino Music Really Is Taking Over The World

mi corazon viajero / YouTube

Listen to a radio station in nearly any city in the world and you’re gonna hear at least a few hit Latino artists streaming over those airwaves.

From LA to New York, London to Paris, Toronto to even Tokyo, Latino music seems to be taking over the world. And you’re not imagining it. Latino artists quickly risen to become one of the most played and streamed music groups everywhere in the world.

And this absolutely sickening video of Japanese dancers enjoying some bachata at a club in Japan proves it.

Artist Tony Peralta came across the Latino-music loving group and uploaded the video of them killing the dance moves to his Twitter.

One Twitter user pointed out that Japan has been a fan of Latin music for a very long time.

Credit: @peraltaprjct / Twitter

Orquesta de la Luz helped launch the Latin music craze in Japan during the 1990s and it’s remained ever since.

Before Orquesta de la Luz, the only other Japanese salsa band to make headlines was Orquesta del Sol, emerging around 1978. They’re said to have influenced Nora and her bandmates, and some even refer to them as the first and foremost Japanese salsa band. But by comparison, their impact was not so immense and widespread as that of Orquesta de la Luz.

Turns out basically where ever you go in Japan you’re gonna hear Latin music.

Credit: @JimmyCaldero / Twitter

We had no idea that Latin music – from salsa and merengue to reggaeton – was so popular across Japan. But we are living for this!

One Twitter user wanted to remind us all of the close relationship between Japan and Latin America.

Credit: @quemirasnojoda / Twitter

It’s true. In fact, the Brazilian city of Sao Paulo is home to more Japanese than any other city outside of Japan. The city’s Libertad district is the largest Japanese community in the world and Japanese culture plays a huge part in shaping local Paulista identity, from the food to the music.

I mean J Balvin is even collaborating with a major Japanese hip hop group.

Credit: @AkibaCam / Twitter

Reggaetonero and Latin music superstar J Balvin has teamed up with Japan-based hip-hop trio m-flo on the theme song for a new animated movie, called HUMAN LOST, to be released in theaters worldwide this fall.

And with the popularity of Japan’s anime culture and Latino music increasing around the world, this collaboration makes perfect sense for the “Mi Gente” singer to do.

And it’s not just in Japan. Latinos are hearing their music all over the world.

Credit: @peraltaprjct / Twitter

Yup, from cities across Europe and the US to tiny town in Canada, western Africa, Hong Kong, and yes, Tokyo, Latino music is taking over the world and we couldn’t be more excited.

And this isn’t #fakenews. Latino music really is dominating music charts around the world.

I mean look at the Luis Fonsi and Daddy Yankee hit ‘Despacito.’ That track is now tied for the longest-running No. 1 ever, in any language, on the Hot 100. And although that’s huge news, it’s nothing when you look at the sheer number of Latino songs hitting the charts.

In 2017, there were a record 19 predominantly Spanish-language tracks that made it onto the Billboard Hot 100. That’s up from just 4 in 2016 and 3 in 2015.

Ok, so it’s obvious Latino music is having a huge moment.

Regardless of how you mix and match it, the reality remains that never in the modern history of the Billboard charts have so many tracks in Spanish coexisted on the Hot 100. So what happened?

As far as the music goes, it’s danceable. That’s a major key, because by making us think with our feet instead of our head, it becomes language-agnostic. 

Now, thanks to the impact of reggaeton, we suddenly have an avalanche of danceable Latin tracks with a pop feel, and the combination is universally appealing. Witness Maluma, whose music seems to work in every language and every territory. 

Some mad collaborations are also helping drive the popularity of Latino artists and their music.

The clincher, however, has been collaborations — both between Latin acts, and between Latin and mainstream acts. Yes, “Despacito” was a hit pre-Bieber, but it became a juggernaut once he got on the track. Same for “Mi Gente” and Beyonce and now, Cardi B with Ozuna on “A Modelo.” The fact that the biggest acts in the world want to record in Spanish opens ears for Latin music around the world.

READ: J Balvin Gets In The Business Of Japanese Hip Hop As He Announces New Project For Anime Film

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