Culture

When His Dad Died He Was Left With A Few Shirts, He Wore One To A Date With His Mom And Her Reaction Is Everything

Credit: Twitter/@ClaytonWalker21

In Latino families, a love between a mother and son is solid as a rock. Sometimes a little too much. The term mama’s boy transcends all cultures, but either way, their bond is always genuine and from the heart. If you’d like a beautiful and heartfelt example of what this kind of relationship between a mother and son, look no further than this viral tweet from Texas. 

Clayton Walker shared on Twitter that his dad died when he was just one year old. Now that he’s a grown man, he was finally big enough to fit into his dad’s shirt. 

Credit: Twitter/@ClaytonWalker21

The young man from Fort Worth, Texas was clearly excited to wear his dad’s shirt for the first time as a grown man. He was so proud and excited to be able to fit in it completely, and he looks good in it, don’t you think? He said in his tweet that has since gone viral, “My father passed away when I was one and I only have a few shirts of his so I wore one for date night with my momma.”

Clayton knew one other person that would be just as proud to see him in his dad’s shirt, and, of course, that was his mother. He surprised her and her reaction was so touching!

Credit: Twitter/@ClaytonWalker21

“My father passed away when I was one and I only have a few shirts of his so I wore one for date night with my momma.”

“Aww,” his mom said with a huge grin. “What do you think?” he asked her.  

“You look good,” she said but she was clearly getting emotional so Clayton hugged his mom to give her comfort. 

Clayton’s tweet has been retweeted almost 200,000 times and like by more than 900,000 people.

Credit: Twitter/@ClaytonWalker21

Clayton addressed the massive attention — both good and bad — that he’s received and said on Twitter, “Just wanna say thank you to all the ones showing love fr fr and to the ones hating and claiming I’m chasing “clout” you don’t know me you WEIRDOS🤣 but regardless big blessings for everyone forever and good vibes por vida🤞🏽💕 God bless.”

Yes, true to form, there were trolls on Twitter that displayed such hate and ignorance toward Clayton and his mom. They actually accused him of using his dad’s death as a way to get his tweet to viral.

Credit: Twitter/@ClaytonWalker21

“Just wanna say thank you to all the ones showing love…and to the ones hating and claiming I’m chasing ‘clout’ you don’t know me you WEIRDOS,” he added on Twitter. 

Clayton went on to say that his mom’s his best friend and there’s nothing wrong with that.

Credit: Twitter/@ClaytonWalker21

And there isn’t! Imagine what it must like for his mom to lose her husband right when their family was becoming a family. It’s so sad, but some people on Twitter just have no love in their life, clearly. 

Some women even shared on Twitter that a man like Clayton that is close to his mom is marriage material.

Credit: Twitter/@ClaytonWalker21

We totally agree with that. If a man is good to his mama, he will be good to his wife! One young woman didn’t even hide her thirst. She tweeted, “Can I go on a date with you?” 

Some people shared their own stories about losing their fathers at a young age as well.

Credit: Twitter/@ClaytonWalker21

Nicole tweeted, “I can’t say it gets easier and you never forget, but you think of all the good things and it makes it a little better.”

If you want even more proof that Clayton is completely dedicated to the love of his father and mother, check this out.

Credit: Twitter/@ClaytonWalker21

We are impressed by the honesty and purity of this guy. He’s so sweet! Clayton tweeted that he didn’t care about all the negativity he got, because at the end of the day he knows his truth and that’s all that matters.

“There is always gonna be hate because some people are ugly and that’s okay but I’ve had so many beautiful comments full of love and my heart is full. Thank you, you beautiful people.”

READ: This Photo Of A Dad Showing Up To Pride Even Though His Daughter Had Moved Away Is The Sweetest Thing I’ve Seen In My Life

Hispanic Heritage Month Is Meant To Celebrate Spanish-Speaking Cultures, But What Does That Mean In The Age Of Trump?

Culture

Hispanic Heritage Month Is Meant To Celebrate Spanish-Speaking Cultures, But What Does That Mean In The Age Of Trump?

This week is the start of a month long commemoration of Latino culture as Hispanic Heritage Month, which runs from Sept. 15 to Oct. 15, kicks off across the U.S. Compared to Black History Month, Women’s History Month, and Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, Hispanic Heritage Month starts in the middle of a month. This is due to September 15 and 16 marking the independence days of Costa Rica, Mexico, Honduras, Nicaragua, Guatemala and El Salvador. 

The annual observance started back in in 1968 under President Lyndon Johnson’s administration as a one-week celebration called Hispanic Heritage Week. It wouldn’t be until years later that President Ronald Reagan proposed extending this celebration into a month-long event. On Aug. 17, 1988, it was put into law officially designating the 30-day period starting on Sept. 15 to Oct. 15 as National Hispanic Heritage Month.

But in the age of Trump where anti-Latino sentiments run high, what does this month truly represent beyond just a marketing opportunity for companies to cash in on our culture?

Credit:@itseduardosolis/Twitter

For the next few weeks, Latinos will be at the forefront when it comes to “representation”. In other words, Latinos will be involved in marketing campaigns, corporate social media accounts will attempt to tweet in Spanish and sugar skulls will be all the rage at your local Target. That’s Hispanic Heritage Month in 2019 and something doesn’t seem right about that. 

The problem with Hispanic Heritage Month is that it represents almost everything that our culture isn’t about. That starts with the name itself, Hispanic, which came into use after the 1980 Census to refer to Spanish and Latin American descendants living in the U.S. It’s this lumping of all Latino people under the Hispanic umbrella, whether it applies to us or not, that is problematic. It leaves out countless of groups of people like those who identify as Afro-Latino or Indigenous that are constantly overlooked or never given any representation whatsoever. 

Beyond just the name, the question of it’s purpose and its meaning in this day and age also comes into play. In reality, most Latinos don’t need a month to be acknowledged or be at the forefront of a marketing campaign to feel accepted. Most celebrate their cultural pride every single day.

Hispanic Heritage Month was created by and promoted by the U.S. government to show that we “arrived” as people in this country. Yet in the 31 years since HHM started, Latinos have more than just arrived. We have made ourselves at home and have contributed to U.S. culture, science and art in ways that deserve more than just a month when brands pander to us. 

While some look at Hispanic Heritage Month as a time to celebrate maybe it can serve a better purpose by letting us tell our own narrative for once. 

Credit:@ric_galvan/Twitter

The purpose of Hispanic Heritage Month needs a reboot rather than some faux-celebration about ethnic representation. Instead, the month should focus on how to move our communities forward and how we can share our own narratives and stories. 

For a population group that makes up 18.1% of the total U.S. population, representation has been hard to come by in recent years. The majority of this visibility has been succumbed to President Trump’s antipathy towards Latinos and demonization of migrant groups coming from the Southern border. Then came Aug. 3, when a shooter inspired by the President Trump anti-Latino rhetoric killed 22 people in El Paso. The deadly shooting sent shock waves to Latino communities across the country and placing fear in the minds of many. While this isn’t the first time Latinos have been targeted, the attack represented divisiveness that has once again reared it’s ugly head. 

Yet instead of living in fear, the best response can only be one of visibility and solidarity. The truth of the matter is that Latinos never needed government validation or permission to share our heritage, no matter what month of the year it may be. 

Rather than waste a month grasping onto what others perceive us as, we should embrace our own stories and bring to light the issues we face everyday. In reality, no month long celebration will ever validate our experiences or our stories. But as long as we have the platform, let’s make the best use of it and share our own narratives for once. 

READ: Latinos Are Still Waiting For Their Own Movie Moment As Hollywood Tries Casting More Diverse Films

A Video Of A Woman Singing ‘Fallaste Corazón’ To Her Abuelo With Dementia Is Going Viral After He Remembered The Lyrics

Things That Matter

A Video Of A Woman Singing ‘Fallaste Corazón’ To Her Abuelo With Dementia Is Going Viral After He Remembered The Lyrics

We all know that growing old is inevitable in this life and that our days on Earth are numbered. Regardless of that truth, it’s human nature to either feel afraid of growing old or to feel melancholy when it comes to thinking of growing old. What can be even more painful is seeing our parents, our aunts and uncles, or our grandparents growing old and imagining a life without them in it. 

Last week, one woman on Twitter shared a video of her grandfather who has dementia singing along with her to “Fallaste Corazón” by Pedro Infante in a fleeting moment of lucidness. 

In the video, you can see the woman singing with such passion to her grandfather who is attentively watching her sing and who later begins to sing along to the lyrics as well.

 Dayis, on Twitter, shared that her “tata” doesn’t remember a lot of things due to his dementia but in an effort to help him with his dementia, she sings to him every day. 

“Today he remembered the song fallaste corazón and I swear I was trying so hard not to cry,” she writes. “This many is my life.”

According to Alzheimers.net, there are many reasons as to why music boosts brain activity.

According to the site, “musical aptitude and appreciation” are two of the last remaining abilities in dementia patients, music can bring emotional and physical closeness, music can shift moods and stimulate positive interactions, and it evokes emotions that bring back memories.

Since musical aptitude and appreciation are the last remaining abilities in patients with Alzheimer’s and dementia, “music is an excellent way to reach beyond the disease and reach the person.” In later stages of dementia, patients are also prone to losing the ability to share emotions with their caregivers or family members but through music, they can still reach that emotional and physical closeness they once had. Further, singing to and with dementia patients is engaging and it leads to patients “exercising more mind power than usual.” 

People who saw the touching video on social media were not only quick to share their reactions after watching it but they also shared their own personal experiences with family members and loved ones who had dementia. 

One Twitter user replied to @Dayannagmusic03 and shared that they couldn’t stop watching the video. 

The Twitter user went on to say that their grandfather also has dementia but notices sometimes that “something around him has triggered a memory” and to see that, they said, is the best feeling in the world. 

The woman who initially posted the video shared that her “tata” is currently on “stage 6” of dementia and although it’s been a long and rough battle, “he always seems to remember certain songs.”

“When he does, it warms my heart with joy,” she continued to write on Twitter. 

It’s safe to say the video had a lot of people in their feels and rightfully so.

We love to see raw and touching moments like these. 

The 0:50 mark made us ugly cry too.

This is right when her grandfather starts to faintly sing along with her and man, she sings with so much emotion too. 

Other folks on Twitter sent their blessings to her family and her grandfather.

We hope her grandfather continues to have more moments like this. 

People on Twitter also compared the heartwarming video to the movie Coco.

Remember the scene toward the end of the film when Miguel sings to Mamá Coco and she begins to remember? I’m not crying, YOU’RE CRYING. 

Others said what we’re all thinking… just thinking about our parents, aunts, uncles, and grandparents getting old hurts a little bit more as we keep getting older ourselves. 

We’d like to keep believing their invincible and will live forever. 

Another Twitter user @missmalindakat tweeted that she had never seen anyone sing with more “heart and passion” than in that video.

One Twitter user shared her own video of her grandfather in a similar situation who also seemed to remember the lyrics to “El Rey” by Vicente Fernández when her great aunt sang it to him.

It’s touching to see other folks sharing their similar experiences and videos in an effort to support one another. This video has also amassed over 47,000 views on Twitter. 

Listen to “Fallaste Corazón” in full on YouTube below: