Culture

She Thought She Would Build Her Dream In The United States, But After Being Deported Tijuana Is Giving Her The Opportunity Of A Lifetime

For those who migrate to the United States,  a chance to start over and to pursue the legend of the American Dream is vital to the years of hard work they will put into adjust and assimilate. Sometimes that dream is the grantee of safety. Other times is the ability to provide for one’s family. Whatever that dream is, it’s something that is promised to the people who come to the United States and it’s often what motivates them.

However, for migrants, the American Dream isn’t always so easily attained. Unfortunately, one’s status oftentimes impacts whether that dream is even accessible at all.

That’s what happened to one mother who was deported before she was able to achieve her dream of opening a Mexican restaurant in the States.

Twitter / @Sergiowtd

However, that didn’t stop her from chasing her goal and making it happen.

Back in April, Twitter user, Sergio Peraza shared a post on Twitter celebrating his mother for finally fulfilling her dream, now encouragement over the restaurant is making the rounds. Peraza’s mother always wanted to open her own restaurant but was deported to Mexico before she was able to make that happen. Instead of being discouraged, she pushed through the disappointment and made her dream a reality in her new home of Tijuana. Called Mi Lindo Nayarit, the restaurant specializes in Mexican cuisine.

Peraza even posted pics to hype up his mom’s cooking and they are all too tempting.

Twitter / @Sergiowtd

The restaurant’s menu offers such treats as huevos el Nayar, Caldo, tortas, empanadas, posole and all the other Mexican delicacies that we love to eat. The dishes Mi Lindo Nayarit serves are perfect for both tourists looking for a taste of authenticity and for locals who just want a yummy meal.

Peraza’s post about his mother’s restaurant quickly went viral, attracting over 5,000 retweets and twice as many likes. Of course, this resulted in lots of comments celebrating Mom and drooling over her food.

Twitter / @jziiie

Some Twitter users wished the new restaurant prosperity and success in their business. The success doesn’t just impact Peraza’s mom. All the people working at the restaurant depend on it to thrive. Supporting small Latinx businesses are what the Latinidad is all about so we love this show of solidarity and appreciate its greater impact.

Others planned trips to visit the restaurant in order to support it.

Twitter / @VegasHippy

The beauty of Mi Lindo Nayarit being in a resort town is that supporters can plan a vacay and support the restaurant during the same trip. Sounds like the perfect idea for any upcoming three day weekends we might have on our calendars.

The overall consensuses was that Mom’s culinary aesthetic can’t be beat.

Twitter /@_americaG

If the old saying that we eat with our eyes first is true, then Peraza’s mom has us feasting for days on just these images. The helpings are huge, the food looks fresh and we can feel the love coming through from these tweets. It’s exactly what Mexican food should be.

Ultimately, it’s so wonderful to see this woman preserve through her deportation and see her dream come true.

Twitter / @mojaavi

With all the terrible news coming from the border and ignorance and hate that is consistently aimed towards migrants, we hope to see more stories of success like this one. Let’s support each other in our dreams. It’s only through that support that we can all prosper and grow. Sometimes all the love and validation we have given will manifest into some bomb Mexican food.

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This Inmate Firefighter Was Nearly Killed Battling California Blazes But Now He’s Facing Deportation

Things That Matter

This Inmate Firefighter Was Nearly Killed Battling California Blazes But Now He’s Facing Deportation

David McNew / Getty Images

Across the United States there are hundreds of thousands of undocumented Americans doing their part to protect and better the country. But far too often, our communities and our leaders don’t return the favor.

One man, a former inmate who was injured while battling California’s historic wildfires, was turned over to Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) after he was released from prison. Instead of being given a second chance, he faces likely deportation back to his native country of Laos – a place he hasn’t known since he was 4 years old.

A California man is facing deportation after nearly dying on the frontlines of the state’s wildfires.

A formerly incarcerated firefighter who helped battle California’s historic wildfires is now in Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) custody, after the state notified the agency he was being released.

Bounchan Keola, 39, left his native Laos at the age of 4. His home is here in the United States – in San Leandro, CA to be exact. But he’s facing the ultimate punishment of being sent back to a place he knows nothing about.

“He made a mistake as a child. He came here impoverished and he was resettled as a refugee when he was 6,” said his San Francisco Asian Law Caucus attorney, Anoop Prasad. “And he literally risked his life. California didn’t have to call ICE to deport him…This case is extremely sad and unfortunate. Society has failed him again and again.” 

Even more shocking is that Keola only had 14 days left on his prison term when he was crushed by a tree while battling the Zogg Fire in early October. He was soon released from prison but then taken into immigration custody by ICE.

While fighting a wildfire, Keyla was severely injured.

Credit: David McNew / Getty Images

Although Keola was convicted of attempted second degree murder, not only has he served his term but he also gave back to the community as one of the thousands of inmate firefighters battling the state’s blazes. In fact, he received a shorter prison sentence because of the extra credit he earned for fighting fires. 

Incarcerated firefighters get two days credit off their sentence for every day they’re working and are paid up to $5 a day. It’s estimated they save the state tens of millions of dollars a year. 

But then Keola got injured.

While he was stationed in Redding, CA., a tree fell on him while he was clearing brush to stop the fire from spreading. He is still in excruciating pain, his lawyer said, and he has not received the proper medical attention.

Since his release from prison, Keola has been in ICE detention.

Just seven days after being injured and with seven days left in his prison term, the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation notified ICE that his release would be coming up. On Oct. 16, the day Keola finished serving his prison sentence in Sacramento, ICE came to pick him up. On Oct. 29, an immigration judge ordered his removal to Laos, records show.

Since being picked up by ICE, Keola has been held at a detention facility in Kern County. Although he faces a deportation order, Laos doesn’t have a repatriation agreement with the U.S., which means he could end up staying in California. But his fate is still unclear. And only a pardon from Newsom, his attorneys said, would expunge his record and allow him to go home freely to his parents and sister. 

I just want to go home and give my mom and dad a hug,” Keola told The Guardian, the first news organization to report the story. “All I know is I’m American. I’ve never thought of myself not being a citizen. I’m just asking for that one, second chance.”

Keola’s fate is in the hands of Gov. Newsom as he awaits a potential pardon for his crime.

Gov. Newsom has painted himself as a champion of those who have been incarcerated and fought on the front lines to save California during the wildfire season. That’s why Keola and his attorney say that his fate is in the hands of the governor. He has asked for a pardon from his prison sentence, showing that he has changed for the better and that his service to the state battling wildfires should count for something.

On Sept. 11,  Newsom signed AB 2147, a bill that will allow formerly incarcerated people to be able to try to expunge their records and become professional firefighters. Inmates who have stood on the frontlines, battling historic fires should not be denied the right to later become a professional firefighter,” Newsom later said in a tweet after signing the bill. 

Yet Keola, an inmate fighting fire on the frontlines, hasn’t been given that chance. And although California is a sanctuary state, which forbids most cooperation with ICE, Keola was still handed over to the agency.

Newsom’s spokesperson, Jesse Melgar, said in a statement: “We are unable to discuss individual clemency applications, but can assure that each application receives careful and individualized consideration.”

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Women Are Opening Up On How To Address Postpartum Depression During The Lockdown

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Women Are Opening Up On How To Address Postpartum Depression During The Lockdown

ABC

At some time or another everyone struggles with their mental health. These days, with the world in lockdown and so many of our human interactions limited, things can feel at best bleak and at worst a complete nightmare. This truth can be doubly true for women who are in the throes of a postpartum.

New mothers are facing a different type of difficulty when it comes to the after-effects of giving birth. Postpartum or postnatal depression affects one out of every 10 new mothers. According to the PANDAS (Pre and Post-Natal Depression Advice and Support organization, during the first week of the pandemic, there was a 75% increase in calls to its helpline, underlining the fact that new mothers need support more than ever.

We asked women for advice on how to cope with Postnatal depression and found some enlightening answers. Check them out below!

“We must be more open to being supportive instead of telling us things like “querías niños no??”. ” This is what u signed up for”. I never received the support from family and when shit finally hit the fan I was judged for my extreme actions. My attempts and self harm were seen as attention seeking.” –flor___venenosa

“This is so cultural. I am so sorry you went through this. It’s no wonder we don’t seek help, we are ridiculed for it.”- mrs_tori_rose@flor___venenosa 

“I think I had PPD when I talked to my mom about it she brushed it off and til this when she brings it up in front of others saying, “I thought she didn’t love her daughter. She kept crying and saying how hard it was. It’s not hard I really thought you didn’t want your daughter.” It is so hurtful every time she makes those comments and really makes me angry. Because it’s not that I didn’t love my baby I was having a hard time adjusting to motherhood. I need to figure out a way to tell to stop saying or making those comments because they aren’t helpful. For me it lasted for about a year. It got better as time went on. I was scared to talk to my doctor about it and was never on medication or anything.” –poncigue

“Did you know even when women finally speak up and say I THINK I HAVE POSTPARTUM DEPRESSION THAT THERES IS NO REAL HELP? You can google all you want and call all the hotlines you want but if you don’t have insurance- you are getting much help.” –90dayfrump

“I did after my daughter was born. I couldn’t figure out why I was so angry & sad when it should’ve been one of the happiest times in my life. This lasted for about a year & half for me.” –dee_mahree

“It would have been so helpful to have known this. My first year of motherhood was so challenging; I had no idea how depressed I was until I went to therapy.” –gg_luv

“I had PPD after my three pregnancies. During the third one I also had perinatal depression which is even less talked about. Like a lot of mental health issues I think it’s hard for people to understand especially when you are expected to be happy all the time because you have a bebé.” –piraguadeframbuesa

“I can believe this because I had postpartum depression with my first pregnancy for 9 months.” –mjtobeone

“Generational healing together.” –cynthiarey_jefa

“More post like this please!”- stephreyesfig

“I was just talking about this last night on how I didn’t get any help from anyone around me I still had to do everything! And I would forget to eat! To feed my new born baby I was detached and I would scream and I hit my 3yr old and still crying right now because my family still tries to throw it in my face that I was a bad mom! I said with people like you around me yes now I regret not leaving when I could I probably would of been better off for my kids and especially for my self I hardly smile now, I’m bitter, I try to make things better but I can’t take back what I did.” –ambelly11212

“I think I had both.” –claudia_renee@rrsls10 

“do you follow this page? If not, you should.. and get yourself highlighted here!” –nicleff@lescarbajalxo 

“*nuestro poder*” – florycantoacademy@fiercebymitu

“I ‘m still surprise on how I made so much profit after seeing many people complains of being scammed this is just amazing am still shocked thanks.” –investor_with_johnw22

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