Culture

She Thought She Would Build Her Dream In The United States, But After Being Deported Tijuana Is Giving Her The Opportunity Of A Lifetime

For those who migrate to the United States,  a chance to start over and to pursue the legend of the American Dream is vital to the years of hard work they will put into adjust and assimilate. Sometimes that dream is the grantee of safety. Other times is the ability to provide for one’s family. Whatever that dream is, it’s something that is promised to the people who come to the United States and it’s often what motivates them.

However, for migrants, the American Dream isn’t always so easily attained. Unfortunately, one’s status oftentimes impacts whether that dream is even accessible at all.

That’s what happened to one mother who was deported before she was able to achieve her dream of opening a Mexican restaurant in the States.

Twitter / @Sergiowtd

However, that didn’t stop her from chasing her goal and making it happen.

Back in April, Twitter user, Sergio Peraza shared a post on Twitter celebrating his mother for finally fulfilling her dream, now encouragement over the restaurant is making the rounds. Peraza’s mother always wanted to open her own restaurant but was deported to Mexico before she was able to make that happen. Instead of being discouraged, she pushed through the disappointment and made her dream a reality in her new home of Tijuana. Called Mi Lindo Nayarit, the restaurant specializes in Mexican cuisine.

Peraza even posted pics to hype up his mom’s cooking and they are all too tempting.

Twitter / @Sergiowtd

The restaurant’s menu offers such treats as huevos el Nayar, Caldo, tortas, empanadas, posole and all the other Mexican delicacies that we love to eat. The dishes Mi Lindo Nayarit serves are perfect for both tourists looking for a taste of authenticity and for locals who just want a yummy meal.

Peraza’s post about his mother’s restaurant quickly went viral, attracting over 5,000 retweets and twice as many likes. Of course, this resulted in lots of comments celebrating Mom and drooling over her food.

Twitter / @jziiie

Some Twitter users wished the new restaurant prosperity and success in their business. The success doesn’t just impact Peraza’s mom. All the people working at the restaurant depend on it to thrive. Supporting small Latinx businesses are what the Latinidad is all about so we love this show of solidarity and appreciate its greater impact.

Others planned trips to visit the restaurant in order to support it.

Twitter / @VegasHippy

The beauty of Mi Lindo Nayarit being in a resort town is that supporters can plan a vacay and support the restaurant during the same trip. Sounds like the perfect idea for any upcoming three day weekends we might have on our calendars.

The overall consensuses was that Mom’s culinary aesthetic can’t be beat.

Twitter /@_americaG

If the old saying that we eat with our eyes first is true, then Peraza’s mom has us feasting for days on just these images. The helpings are huge, the food looks fresh and we can feel the love coming through from these tweets. It’s exactly what Mexican food should be.

Ultimately, it’s so wonderful to see this woman preserve through her deportation and see her dream come true.

Twitter / @mojaavi

With all the terrible news coming from the border and ignorance and hate that is consistently aimed towards migrants, we hope to see more stories of success like this one. Let’s support each other in our dreams. It’s only through that support that we can all prosper and grow. Sometimes all the love and validation we have given will manifest into some bomb Mexican food.

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A Group Of TPS Beneficiaries Are Touring The Country In A Bus To Save The Crucial Immigration Program

Things That Matter

A Group Of TPS Beneficiaries Are Touring The Country In A Bus To Save The Crucial Immigration Program

tps_alliance / Instagram

Updated September 23, 2020

A coalition of people is coming together to stand up for Temporary Protected Status beneficiaries. Federal judges recently gave the Trump administration the approval to end the status for 300,000 people in the U.S.

A group of Temporary Protect Status holders is on a road trip to save the program for 300,000 people.

The National TPS Alliance is driving across the country to engage voters about the need to protect the program. The “Road to Justice” road tour started in Los Angeles and will be stopping in 54 cities in 32 states. The tour ends in Washington, D.C. where the TPS holders will petition Congress directly to save the program.

The program was started in 1990 and offers safe refuge for people who’s countries have experienced disaster, civil unrest, or other extraordinary circumstances. Some people who have been granted TPS in the U.S. include Central Americans after Hurricane Mitch, the second-largest hurricane in the Atlantic, devastated large swaths of the region in 1998. Haitians were also given TPS after the earthquake that devastated Port Au Prince in 2010.

The organization is hoping to engage voters and get them to care about the immigration crisis facing the nation. Activists have already praised the group and pledged to support their cause at the ballot box.

“We are going to vote for justice, for the TPS community,” Angélica Salas, executive director of the Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles, told NBC News. “President (Trump) and his administration are racist and do not care about the damage they are causing to our community.”

Original: A federal court just handed a huge ‘victory’ to the Trump administration, which has been eager to restart mass deportations. Despite a global health pandemic, the administration has been pressing forward with plans to deport hundreds of thousands of undocumented immigrants.

Until now, many of these migrants were safe from deportation thanks to Temporary Protected Status, which shields some immigrants from deportation under humanitarian claims. However, the recent court decision – in San Francisco’s 9th Circuit – gives Trump exactly what he wants right before the elections.

But how will it affect immigrant communities across the country? Here’s everything you need to know about this major decision.

The 9th Circuit Court just ended TPS for more than 300,000 undocumented immigrants.

A California appeals court on Monday gave the Trump Administration permission to end Temporary Protected Status for immigrants from El Salvador, Nicaragua, Haiti, and Sudan, clearing the way for officials to force more than 300,000 immigrants out of the country.

The decision affects people from all walks of life, many of whom have lived in the U.S. for decades, have U.S.-born children and have been considered essential workers during the coronavirus pandemic.

This week’s ruling from the circuit court comes after a district court (also in California) temporarily halted Trump’s plan to end TPS in late 2018 after a group of lawyers sued, arguing that Trump was motivated by racial discrimination.

“The president’s vile statements about TPS holders made perfectly clear that his administration acted out of racial animus,”Ahilan Arulanantham, a lawyer for the ACLU of Southern California, wrote in a statement. “The Constitution does not permit policy to be driven by racism. We will seek further review of the court’s decision.”

But today’s 2-1 decision reversed the district court’s temporary order and allowed the federal government to take away TPS protections while the court case continues.

ICE and DHS has promised to wait several months before taking away TPS status if the agency won in court. As a result, the ACLU told NPR that it expects the protections to start ending no sooner than March, meaning that Joe Biden could reverse the administration’s decision if he wins in November, though the organization plans to fight back in the meantime.

Temporary Protected Status was created to protect people in the U.S. from being sent back to dangerous places – and it’s saved lives.

Credit: Daniel Ortega / Getty Images

The TPS program was first introduced in 1990, and it has protected immigrants from more than 20 countries at various points since then. More than 300,000 people from 10 different nations currently use the program, some of whom have lived and worked in the United States for decades.

Trump has sharply criticized the program, sometimes along racial lines, and in one infamous and widely criticized incident two years ago, the president reportedly referred to the program’s beneficiaries as “people from shithole countries.”

TPS provides protection for short periods of up to 18 months, but the federal government has continuously extended it for the countries mentioned in the lawsuit “based on repeated findings that it remains unsafe to return.” 

As a result, it said, most TPS holders have been living in the U.S. for more than a decade, contributing to their communities and raising their families. Many of the more than 200,000 U.S.-citizen children of TPS holders have never been to the country their parents are from and would have to choose between their families and their homes.

The ruling will have a major impact on migrant families and communities across the U.S.

Credit: Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images

Immigration advocacy groups are slamming the court’s ruling, noting it will impact hundreds of thousands of TPS holders as well as their families and communities. In a statement, Beth Werlin, executive director of the American Immigration Council, said the decision will “plunge their lives into further turmoil at a time when we all need greater certainty.” 

As the global pandemic stretches on, immigrants with protected status make up a large portion of the country’s front-line workers. More than 130,000 TPS recipients are essential workers, according to the Center for American Progress. 

“TPS recipients have deep economic and social roots in communities across the nation,” said Ali Noorani, president and CEO of the National Immigration Forum. “And, as the U.S. responds to the COVID-19 pandemic, TPS recipients are standing shoulder to shoulder with Americans and doing essential work.”

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Latina-Owned Wine Brands

Fierce

Latina-Owned Wine Brands

Justin Sullivan / Getty

As we continue to abide by CDC guidelines and stick out the pandemic by staying at home, many of us are also learning to take take part in the joys of virtual happy hours. And that means lots of wine.

So, why not also take part in promoting Latina-owned businesses while in quarantine by making sure that the wine brands you buy are in fact Latina owned? We rounded up some of the top Latina wine businesses in the game and have put them down in a list for you to check out and support.

Check them out below!

Ceja Vineyards

This 4th generation Latino family-owned winery is from Napa & Sonoma Valley. They’re a family-owned business that not only makes amazing wines but also shares fantastic wines, recipes, and happiness on their Instagram page.

Alumbra Cellars Shine Forth

https://www.instagram.com/p/CEN_xHABV8i/

This small wine company is Latina-owned and from Oregan. Alumbra Cellars is a small production wine from a small family vineyard.

Herencia Del Valle

Generations of the Herencia Del Valle family have worked in the vineyards together to craft award-winning wines. The brand is a boutique Cabernet house of the Napa Valley with a big base that loves their chardonnay.

Robledo Family Winery

This boutique winery produces a diverse portfolio of premium wines and is located in Napa, Sonoma, and Lake Counties. Many of the comments on their page seem to praise their red grape varieties!

Enriquez Estate Wines

This family-owned micro-winery specializes in small-batch Pinot Noir and Tempranillo wines from the Sonoma Coast, Petaluma Gap, and Russian River Valley. Muscat, Cab Franc, and Tannat are some of its fans’ most popular choices.

Fathia Wines

Fathia means victorious and there’s no doubt that this brand has had a victory with this brand. Fathia Wines is a family-owned micro-winery that is located in Sonoma Valley and produces single-varietal and naturally fermented wines.

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