Culture

Mexico City Is One Of The Must-See Cities In The World And Here’s Why

Mexico City is one of the biggest cultural capitals of the world, with incredible art, architecture, and beautiful sights to see. The bustling city, which is one of the most populated places on earth, offers centuries of history dating back to the Aztec empire that once stood there. It’s one of the most exciting places to visit, and has some of the most delicious food you can ever try. And best of all, it’s affordable.

Here are 20 reasons you absolutely must put Mexico City on your list of places to travel to!

20. Pujol

CREDIT: pujolrestaurant / Instagram

One of the most famous restaurants not just in the entire country, but the world. So much so that it was featured on an episode of “Chef’s Table.” Their mole, made with hundreds of ingredients and slow roasted to perfection, has become their most renown dish, though the rest of the menu ain’t too shabby. Come for one of those life changing meals you’ll talk about forever.

19. La Pulqueria

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This cool little punk bar serves the unofficial drink of the city, pulque, in a variety of flavors. Housed inside of an old three story house, La Pulqueria offers live music and place to try some of the best pulque in the city. It’s a perfect spot to kick off your night.

18. El Moro Churreria

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Are you ready to absolutely lose your mind over some churros and chocolate calentito? Then look no further than El Moro, a chic and hip little cafe that makes the most delicious sweets you’ll ever have the pleasure of tasting. And since CDMX is a walking city, you don’t have to feel too guilty.

17. Lardo

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Another one of the city’s best restaurants, led by a chef once voted the best chef in Latin America, the small neighborhood restaurant offers Mexican-Mediterranean cuisine in an adorably chic and beautifully-designed space. Totally grammable food and decor!

16. Stroll Around La Condesa

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Considered one of Mexico City’s hippest neighborhoods, La Condesa has great bars and restaurants that can be found along its tree lined streets. Rent a bike and check out the neighborhood, including a picnic in Parque Mexico and grub at Tacos Gus.

15. Xochimilco

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A huge series of floating gardens can be found in Xochimilco. Board one of their color barcas and take a nice, long, leisurely trip surrounded by nature, music and food. You can literally hire a mariachi or norteño band as it floats past you on a barca, then buy the most amazing Mexico City-style quesadillas you’ve ever had in your life.

14. Museo Nacional de Antropología

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The Museum of Anthropology is one of the most incredible architectural marvels you’ll lay eyes on. While the museum itself boasts fascinating ancient artifacts and exhibits that delve into past cultures and Mexico’s history, the building itself is worth the trip. There a huge indoor waterfall structure that will make your moth drop.

13. Zócalo

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The main square of the Mexico City’s centro historico is surrpunded by beautiful historic buildings and the famous cathedral. La Casa de las Sirenas is the spot to grab a drink at and look upon the entire square. It’s a great place to see some history.

12. La Ciudadela

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This mercado de artesanias has everything you could ever want to buy, from artisan made leather purses, shoes, and hand spun wool dolls, to clothing, toys, and glassware. It has everything you can expect, and then some! And you can grab a delicious snack or drink from one of the many little cafes found inside, perfect for a shopping break.

11. Palacio de Bellas Artes

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The palace dedicated to preserving and holding Mexican art and culture is famous the world over for being home to a large scale mural painted by famed artist Diego Rivera. That alone is worth a visit, however there’s performances that will blow your mind from renown professional dancers and gorgeous art exhibits.

10. Dinner at Rosetta

CREDIT: Rosettamexico / Twitter

This beautiful, colonial-style restaurant offers some of the best food in the city. It’s warm and dimly lit, making it the perfect spot for a romantic date. But if you want an amazing dinner with friends to kick off the night, this is your spot also.

9. Pyramid of the Sun

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This well-known pyramid in the ancient city of Teotihuacan is one of the largest in the world. Climb to the top of the pyramid and see what the ancient people once looked upon. It’s a breathtaking place.

8. Chapultepec Castle

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Chapultepec Castle is located on top of Chapultepec Hill within one of the largest parks in all the world. Inside you’ll find a fascinating history museum and incredible views. It’s definitely worth the visit. Plus there’s a zoo nearby.

7. Mercado Medellin

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This market situated in Colonia Roma is perfect for food lovers who want to try a little bit of everything, and take some snacks and ingredients home. Sit at a counter for some antojitos or buy yummy snacks from all over Latin America. Either way, your stomach will be happy.

6. Casa de Frida Kahlo

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The hone and final resting place of iconic artist Frida Kahlo is an absolute must when visiting Mexico City. It’s beautiful garden is the necessary calm you need after a day of walking, and the incredible original paintings by the artist will take your breath away. There’s also an exhibit of her clothes and accessories, and if you look closely for a brass sculpture shaped like a toad, what you’ll actually be finding is the urn holding Frida’s ashes.

5. Mama Rumba

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Wanna get down to some salsa music in one of the most exciting, lively bars in the city? Mama Rumba is the place to go. Bring your dancing shoes and, most importantly, your hip-shaking moves.

4. Museo del Objeto del Objeto

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A museum dedicated to objects, there are fascinating exhibitions – both permanent and temporary – that celebrate and pay homage to the artistry of the every day objects we interact with in our lives. It may seem strange, but it’s a fun, quirky, and fascinating space. They once even had a exhibit dedicated to – ahem – erotic objects.

3. Plaza Garibaldi

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You can’t visit anywhere in Mexico and not hear mariachi music. It’s just not allowed. And in Plaza Garibaldi, you can hear beautiful music while enjoying great drinks and food. It’ll fill you with pride and happiness.

2. Leon Trotsky Museum

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For those of you who are into politics and political history, a visit to the Leon Trotsky Museum is also a visit to the place where the famed revolutionary was also assassinated. It’s not for everybody but if you’re into political science you’ll be happy as a clam.

1. Luis Barragan House and Studio

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While his name is not a household one, Luis Barragan was one of the greatest minds in modern architecture. A visit to his home and studio is a chance to wander into the mind and process of a design genius. Plus, it’s absolutely stunning.

This is only the tip of the iceberg! There’s so much more to explore that you’ll be so sorry to leave this incredible city. Perfect! That just gives you an excuse to plan another trip!

This Is What Mexico Looks Like As It Reopens During A Global Pandemic

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This Is What Mexico Looks Like As It Reopens During A Global Pandemic

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Step outside into Mexico’s capital (home to more than 20 million people) and you’d be forgiven for not realizing we’re still in the midst of a global pandemic that’s killed more than half a million people.

As of this week, several Mexican states have entered the initial phase of reopening and Mexicans are taking full advantage of the newly found sense of ‘freedom’ – visiting restaurants, cafés and shops in droves. However, experts warn that Mexico will likely follow the dangerous path of the United States – which opened prematurely and is now having to shut down businesses once again as cases reach record levels.

Here’s an inside look into the daily reality of Chilangos (as residents of Mexico City are called) and what the future holds for the country amid Coronavirus.

Mexico City – along with 17 other states – have entered the first phase of a gradual reopening.

Despite being home to the largest number of active cases across Mexico, the capital joined 17 other states in a phased reopening this week. Mexico City lowered its contagion risk from a level red (the most extreme) to level orange, which permits some businesses to reopen.

However, Mexico City – on the day of the reopening – saw a record 5,432 new cases and 638 confirmed deaths. Mayor Sheinbaum said that the switch to orange was possible because hospital occupancy levels are at 59% and trending downwards. But to many, the government is prioritizing the economy over public safety and health. Several government officials insisted that it was safe to proceed to the reduced warning level but health experts disagreed.

The mayor stressed that if hospital occupancy levels go above 65% again, red light restrictions will be reinstated. She urged residents to continue to take precautions to reduce the risk of infection. People should continue to stay at home as much as possible and the use of face masks in public places remains mandatory.

Along with Mexico City, 17 other states moved into the orange phase of reopening – including tourist hotspots of Jalisco, Veracruz, Quintana Roo, and Yucatan.

The federal government instituted a traffic light system to simplify the risk management of Covid-19

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Shortly after the Coronavirus outbreak began, the federal government instituted a color-coded risk management system to simplify its messaging. With red being the highest risk level and green being the lowest, every state until June 15th was still in the red level.

As of July 1, 18 states are now in the orange level. This means that restaurants, cafés, and shops can begin to reopen with reduced capacity. Hotels and markets will also be allowed to resume service, meaning that tourism will likely begin to pick up again very soon.

President AMLO has been eager to get the economy reopened after it was reported that at least one million formal jobs have been lost and the country’s economy is expected to shrink by 8.8% this year.

On the first day of reopening, shops in Mexico City’s historic center were jammed full of shoppers.

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The city’s historical center is a hub of economic activity. You can literally find pretty much anything you could ever want in these cobblestones streets. The district is home to more than 27,000 businesses and as of this week they’re now permitted to open once again. And resident wasted no time in hitting the shops.

Long lines formed outside shops with few people wearing masks and most stores not truly enforcing social distancing requirements. Some offered antibacterial gel and took people’s temperatures before allowing them to enter.

Officially, shops and businesses with an odd street number are permitted to open three days a week, Monday, Wednesday and Friday, whereas even-numbered shops can open Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday.

In order to prevent crowds from accumulating and promote social distancing, 31 streets were converted into pedestrian-only zones.

Restaurants, cafés, and shopping centers are all open for business – with some protective measurements in place.

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Even before the official change to semáforo naranja, several restaurants and cafés were already offering dine-in service. But now restaurants are officially allowed to operate at limited capacity, while staff are required to wear masks and shields, and restaurants are’s allowed to play music or issue reusable menus.

Street markets, known as tianguis, will also be allowed to restart which will help many of the city’s informal workers. And the following week, department stores and shopping malls will also be allowed to reopen at 30% capacity and with limited hours.

Mexico is hardly finished with the Coronavirus threat – in fact, cases have been reaching record levels.

Credit: Covid.gob.mx

Although not yet at the levels seen in the U.S. or Brazil, Mexico has been struggling with its response to the Coronavirus pandemic. As of July 1, the country has had more than 225,000 confirmed cases and almost 28,000 deaths, with Mexico City being the epicenter of the nation’s outbreak.

And the worst doesn’t appear to be over. In a Covid-19 situation report published Monday, the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security noted that Mexico had reported a decreasing daily incidence for three consecutive days.

“However, Mexico does not yet appear to have reached its peak,” the report said. “Based on recent trends, we expect Mexico to report increasing daily incidence over the coming days. Mexico is currently No. 6 globally in terms of daily incidence,” it added.

Mexico Was Rattled By A Massive Earthquake And This Is What It Was Like In The Country’s Capital

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Mexico Was Rattled By A Massive Earthquake And This Is What It Was Like In The Country’s Capital

Tomas Bravo / Getty Images

Mexico woke up today to the sounds of sirens which gave way to intense shaking from the southern state of Chiapas to the capital, Mexico City. Although the country is no stranger to strong earthquakes, the trauma of 2017’s massive quake is still raw and sent many residents into a state of panic as the alarms sounded.

Here in Mexico City, the shaking was intense despite being some 300 miles from the epicenter of the 7.4 quake – which was located in Oaxaca. At least one death has been attributed to the quake, millions are without power, and millions more are wondering when the next one will hit.

Note: this is a developing story and we will update it as more information becomes available.

A preliminary 7.4 magnitude earthquake struck the southern coast of Mexico and was felt throughout the region.

Credit: Tomas Bravo / Getty Images

Mexico has been hit by a large earthquake with a magnitude of 7.4, centered along the coastline of southern Oaxaca state. Although the epicenter was some 300 miles from the capital of Mexico City, strong shaking was felt in the nation’s capital – as well as as far away as Veracruz, Guatemala and El Salvador.

The quake has knocked out power to millions, damaged several buildings, and triggered tsunami warnings up and down the Mexican coastline.

A report from Reuters said that at least one person was killed in Oaxaca as a result of the quake.

In Mexico City, residents fled their homes for the relative safety of the streets amid violent shaking.

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Living in Mexico City, I can confirm that the shaking was super strong here in the capital – especially in Colonia Roma. Many had to scramble to their knees to avoid falling over or to hold onto a car or building to steady themselves amid the strong shaking.

More than anything, it was also a very loud earthquake. The sound of the earth underneath a massive city shaking violently is extremely loud and almost as terrifying as the actual shaking.

For almost an hour after the initial shaking, many residents were still outside in the streets, too afraid to go back inside their homes. And with good reason – as of early afternoon there have already been more than 150 aftershocks.

Standing outside among my neighbors, one thing was painfully obvious: the trauma of the 2017 earthquake is still fresh on many people’s minds. Many were scared to tears.

Videos of the shaking quickly made their way onto social media.

From buildings swaying into each other, the ground moving beneath people’s feet, and the inside of people’s homes being violently tossed from side to side, videos of the quake have quickly gone viral.

One such video showed a hospital in Mexico City suffering extensive damage as it was violently shaken from side to side.

One thing is for sure: the city’s earthquake warning system worked perfectly.

Most of Mexico City is equipped with an early earthquake warning system. And it can be credited for saving lives. In my neighborhood, La Roma, we had a good 30-45 second warning before the shaking actually began. In fact, the alarm gave us so much warning that many of us thought it was just a test – because in the past the shaking typically starts just mere seconds after the alarm.

Since the 2017 earthquake, which killed hundreds, Mexico has been hard at work at fine tuning the alarm system. They have invested some 450 million pesos ($20 million USD) into additional sensors and sirens strategically placed around populated areas to better alert residents – and it seems to have paid off.

Mexico is no stranger to strong quakes – having been hit by even larger ones in 2017 and 1985.

Credit: Luis Alberto Cruz Hernandez / Getty Images

Mexico is one of the world’s most seismically active regions and has a long history of devastating earthquakes. The country is located on top of three large tectonic plates and their movement causes regular quakes and occasional volcanic eruptions.

In 2017, two powerful earthquakes hit the country in two weeks, toppling buildings, cracking highways and killing hundreds of people. One had a magnitude of 7.1 and the other a magnitude of 8.1.

Meanwhile, the nation’s capital – Mexico City, is particularly vulnerable to earthquakes because it was built on a former lakebed. Most of the city’s 20 million residents live above very soft and wet ground which amplifies shaking and is prone to liquefaction, in which dirt transforms into a dense liquid when sufficiently churned. This is why even weaker earthquakes are often felt more strongly in Mexico City than other parts of the country.

Despite the large earthquake, Mexicans are taking it all in stride and a string of memes have already hit the Internet mocking the ridiculousness of 2020.

In a matter of minutes, memes depicting just how crazy 2020 is – from COVID to earthquakes – had already taken over Mexican Twitter.

And if this one isn’t all too real:

Given the ongoing Covid-19 crisis, this one is super relatable. As I ran out of my apartment to the street, I had to run back inside to grab that mask. #SafetyFirst