Culture

22 Best Beaches In Latin America: Beat The Cold Winter And Escape To One Of These Beautiful Sunny Beaches

Latin-America has the best beaches on earth. Period. Picture this, you’re walking in crystal-clear waters, the white sandy beaches are covered in tropical flora. Music plays in the background, you’re waiting for the Piña Colada and fish tacos you just ordered. Might go snorkeling in a centuries-old cenote later, or maybe you could take a nap in the Robinson Crusoe-inspired cabana you rented for a very reasonable price. Amirite or amirite?

If, instead of being on a tropical island somewhere in the Caribbean or South America, you’re stuck in your cold, smog-infested, snowy city, we recommend you take a look at the list below. We rounded up the best beaches in Latin-America to help you escape your day to day. 

Rio de Janeiro

This Brazilian city is home to Copacabana beach, sugarloaf mountain, Carnaval and Christ the Redeemer Statue.

Punta Cana 

The Dominican region is known for its beaches, luxury resorts and indigenous ecological park. 

Varadero

Major Cuban resort town on Hicacos Peninsula, with its 20km beach, golf course and several parks. 

Tulum

This Mexican town in the Mayan riviera is known for its Caribbean crystal clear waters and white sand beaches, as well as for its Mayan archaeological site El Castillo and Parque Nacional Tulum —plus, lots and lots of ‘cenotes’ (natural pits, or sinkholes, resulting from the collapse of limestone bedrock that exposes groundwater underneath).

Puerto Vallarta

Resort town with historic center and its famous ‘El Malecon’ broadwalks, plus its lush beaches which offer snorkeling and fishing —don’t miss the insta-famous spot ‘Islas Marietas’ where you can swim into a hidden beach in a cave. 

Florianopolis

Occupying 54-long Santa Catarina island, this state capital of … is known for its beaches and surfing. 

Costa Rica

This Central American country with capital San Jose, is known fo its tropical rainforest, beautiful beaches and wildlife. A True paradise. 

Cabo San Lucas

The Mexican beach resort town is known for hosting some of the liveliest nights out. The beaches are a sight to be seen, as is the striking ‘El Arco’ formation. 

Cuba

The caribbean island is a white-sand beach heaven, with its colorful buildings, lively clubs and tropical music —and let’s not forget the cigars. Azucar!

Cozumel

This laid-back Mexican Caribbean island is famed for its beaches, the scuba-diving and Mayan ruins of ‘El Cedral’. Not to be missed. 

Ubatuba

The Brazilian municipality with Itamambuca Beach, Ubatuba Aquarium and the TAMAR project turtle sanctuary, this beach will make for a perfect, quiet, solitary and tropical retreat. 

Maceio

This city is known for its 19th century colonial heritage, its white-sand beaches and an off-shore coral reef. 

Cartagena

The pearl of the Caribbean is a port city with a 16th century castle, a walled old town and lovely beaches, plus the Islas del Rosario which are a must. The ideal beachy getaway when you also want to do some sightseeing.

Akumal

Akumal is a beach resort town on Mexico’s Riviera Maya. Its located alongside the worlds 2nd largest coral reef and if you get lucky, you might spot some turtles and tropical fish swimming around in the waters of its Yal-Ku lagoon. 

Acapulco

This Mexican resort city is known for the cliff divers of La Quebrada, its lively night life and beautiful beaches. 

Isla Mujeres 

The Mexican island is known for Playa Norte beach, it offers diving on offshore coral reefs and a sea turtle sanctuary. 

Saint Lucia

This lush Caribbean island is home to the Piton mountains and it offers stunning landscapes, volcanic beaches, hot springs and capital Castries. 

Salvador

The bahian capital is rich with Afro-Brazilian culture and its Pelourinho colonial district offers historic buildings to add to your trip. Don’t miss the district’s Sao Francisco church. 

Lima

Peru’s bustling capital is full of Spanish colonial buildings, the Museo Larco of art, and a vibrant food scene and lovely beaches. What’s not to love?

Antigua

The Caribbean island is a white-sand beach and coral reef paradise. Plus Nelson’s Dockyard and Shirley Heights lookouts are jaw-dropping.

San Juan

The capital city of Puerto Rico has it all. Beaches, colonial sights, rich food and lively nights out. Don’t miss our on the colonial El  Morro and La Fortaleza forts. 

Punta del Este

This Uruguayan resort city is known for ‘The Hand’ sculpture, Mansa beach and Gorriti Island. A beautiful south-American destination.

Roatan

This Island in Honduras boasts white sandy beaches, tropical flora and vibrant coral reefs you can dive in. The tranquility will help you re-charge for the year to come. 

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Americans Are Flocking To Mexico Amid The Pandemic And Being Terrible Tourists In The Process

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Americans Are Flocking To Mexico Amid The Pandemic And Being Terrible Tourists In The Process

Despite being one of the world’s hardest hit countries by the Covid-19 pandemic, Mexico never once closed its doors to international tourism. In fact, the country has worked hard to lure travelers from the U.S. as Americans faced increasingly tough restrictions at home. This has had a profound impact on the country’s experience with Covid-19, with so many Mexicans either falling ill themselves or knowing someone who has.

With so many Mexicans having first hand experience with the virus, it makes sense why so many have strong opinions about tourist’s behaviors while visiting the country.

Tourists are still welcomed in Mexico but their bad behavior is not.

Most Mexicans agree with their government’s open borders approach during the pandemic, since the alternative would have meant even worse economic situation for a country already suffering record levels of poverty. But the influx of tourists to the country has brought with it a level of resentment at those who fail to follow local health guidelines while on vacation.

Mexico never closed its airports to tourists and one walk down a block in Mexico City’s popular Condesa or Roma neighborhoods and you’ll spot American tourists within minutes – many failing to wear a mask. The problem is even more severe in popular tourist destinations like Oaxaca.

There, tourists often travel from the bustling city of Oaxaca into remote villages where Indigenous residents have even less access to proper medical care.

Residents fear that tourists feel they are exempt from local Covid-19 guidelines.

Many residents who have had their own personal experience with the coronavirus has made them sensitive to the pandemic situation in their community. As case numbers continued to rise, many noticed more tourists defying widely practiced public-health protocols, like wearing face masks in public.

On Feb. 25, a popular photographer from Oaxaca, Frank Coronado, posted a plea to his 171,000 Instagram followers: “Dear travelers, you are welcome in Oaxaca, but you should ALWAYS wear a mask when you are in public places.”

He wanted to publicly address the issue and encourage visitors to do better — particularly foreigners who travel from Oaxaca City into smaller rural villages, where artisans are even more vulnerable. He told the Washington Post, “I get mad because I already went through [covid-19] and know how bad it feels. I don’t want my people, the people of Oaxaca, to get sick.”

With an economy based on services, many don’t have the freedom to work from home.

Many in Mexico don’t have the luxury of isolating from tourists — such as Aurora Tostado, who owns the downtown coffee shop Marito & Moglie with her husband.

“People in Mexico, we have to get out of our homes to work. It’s not like we can work remotely like most of the people in the U.S.,” Tostado told the Washington Post. Like others in hospitality, Tostado benefits financially from having tourists, and she is happy to welcome them back, she says. She just hopes they will consider the chain reaction of their behavior as they enjoy the culture that makes her city special

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These Were The Moments That Defined Latin America In 2020 That Weren’t About COVID-19

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These Were The Moments That Defined Latin America In 2020 That Weren’t About COVID-19

2020 will easily go down in manny of our memories as the year that just wouldn’t stop. As the year started, it all seemed to be sort of fine as the world came together to battle record-breaking Australian bushfires and worked to hopefully contain an outbreak of a strange new virus in China.

However, as the year comes to a close things have gone de mal a peor for the world in general, but for the Latino population in the United States and Latin America as a region in particular. Though it’s hard to realize just how much we all witnessed and experienced since so much of what happened seems like it was a lifetime ago.

Here’s a look back at some the defining moments from 2020 across Latin America.

Jennifer Lopez and Shakira kicked off the year hopeful with a history-making performance at the Super Bowl.

Yes, believe it or not, this happened in 2020. The pair put on what many have called the best half time show in Super Bowl history. They were also joined by J Balvin and Bad Bunny.

Bolivia’s Evo Morales was forced into exile, only to return to the country in November.

After being forced into exile at the end of 2019 for attempting to illegally run in upcoming presidential elections, Morales spent a year abroad – first in Mexico and then in Argentina.

Mexico’s President AMLO made his first trip abroad to visit Donald Trump at the White House.

Mexico’s President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador is a staunch populist and has long said his primary focus is domestic policy within Mexico. Therefore, despite two years in office, AMLO hadn’t left Mexico once. So it came as a surprise when his first trip abroad was a visit to the U.S. leader who had long disparaged Mexico, the government, and Mexicans – not to mention his trip came in the middle of a global pandemic.

Migrant caravans continued to make their way towards the U.S. despite interference from Mexico and Covid-19.

Migrants attempting to make their way to the U.S. isn’t unique to 2020. For decades, migrants have long banded together for safety in numbers along the treacherous journey to the north. However, they became larger and better organized in 2020, perhaps owing to the new dangers of Mexican interference.

Mexico’s AMLO vowed to stop migrants from reaching the U.S.-Mexico border, adhering to Trump’s request. It was also noteworthy because the caravans continued despite the Covid-19 crisis, which has hit the region particularly hard.

Peru saw three presidents in the span of a few weeks after massive protests.

Peru is facing one of the greatest crises the nation has faced. Just as the country seemed to be emerging from the worst of its battle against the Covid-19 pandemic, the country has entered a severe political crisis.

The country’s elected president, Martin Vizcarra, was impeached and removed from office. His predecessor responded with a heavy hand to the protests that ensued resulting in his resignation less than 24 hours later. The government then had to find someone willing to take the job which proved to be a tough sell.

In fact, massive protests swept across Latin America.

From Mexico in the north to Cuba in the Caribbean and Chile in the south, protests were seen all across the region. Although each movement had it’s own stated goal and objectives, many were largely borne out of the same purpose: to fight back against corruption.

Brazil’s President Jaír Bolsonaro tested positive for Covid-19 but it did nothing to change his approach to the pandemic.

Jaír Bolsonaro has long been compared to Donald Trump, with many calling him the Donald Trump of South America. The two were also strongly aligned in their responses to the Coronavirus pandemic, with the pair largely downplaying the severity of the crisis.

Then, Bolsonaro became infected with the virus and many hoped it would change his view on the crisis. It didn’t.

A growing feminist movement developed in Mexico, demanding protection from a shocking rise in violence against women.

Mexico has long been battling endemic violence and the country has continued to see record-setting rates of homicides. But it was the growing rate of violence against women, particularly femicide, that gained national attention.

Women banded together and started large nationwide protests. Over the summer, women in the capital of Mexico City occupied government buildings and destroyed many of the city’s most popular monuments to hopefully get their message across. Although the movement has gained more recognition by Mexicans, the government has still failed to address their concerns. Let’s hope things are different in 2021.

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