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These Are The 21 Most Breathtaking Places To Watch The Sunset In Mexico

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Renowned for its picturesque, sandy beaches, Mexico has more shoreline than any country in the Western Hemisphere south of the United States. Its Gulf Coast and Caribbean beaches feature turquoise blue and green waters and Mexico’s white and toupe-colored Pacific beaches appear to go on forever.

As impressive as the beaches are, Mexico’s mountains are on different scale than most people in the United States are accustomed to. The summits of more than a dozen of Mexico’s peaks are higher in elevation than any mountain summits in the Continental United States. Mexico even has two dormant volcanos with summits over 18,000 feet, a staggering 4,000 feet higher than any of the mountain peaks in Colorado or California.

No surprise, then, that Mexico is home to some of the most beautiful sunset-settings in the world. Whether your ideal sunset spills toward you over the ocean or you prefer watching the setting sun fall behind mountains, the following is a list of the 21 places to watch the sunset in Mexico.

1. Puerto Vallarta

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Overlooking the Pacific Ocean, the town of Puerta Vallarta has mountains in the background, cobblestone streets, and Spanish colonial-style homes. Reminiscent of a Mediterranian pueblo, Puerta Vallarta is Mexico at its finest.

2. Sumidero Canyon

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The walls in Sumidero Canyon are verticle in many places and reach as high as 3,300 feet. And, the river that runs through it, La Grijalva, is larger in volume than the Colorado River in Arizona.

3. Mazatlan

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Mazatlan is on the Pacific Coast and has a 13-mile long boardwalk along wide, sandy beaches. Mazatlan is one of the most modern and popular resort towns in Mexico.

4.  Pico de Orizaba

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Pico de Orizaba more than 18,000 feet high. That means, in elevation, Pico de Orizabah dwarfs every peak in the Continental United States by more than a half a mile.

5. Isla Cozumel

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Mostly undeveloped, Cozumel is an island in the Caribbean renowned for its turquoise blue and green water which makes it one of the most popular snorkelling and diving destinations in Mexico.

6. Tulum

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On the Yucatan Peninsula, Tulum is famous for its white sand, Caribbean-blue waters, and the well-preserved Mayan ruins on the cliff above the beaches. It is arguably the most beautiful sunset-setting in Mexico.

7. Los Cabos

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On the southern tip of the Baja Peninsula, Los Cabos refers to the general area including Cabos. Everywhere around the city there are views of the sunset from the hilltops above the town.

8. Copper Canyon

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The crevasse below the Sierra Madre Occidental mountains, Copper Canyon is the deepest, widest canyon in North America, considerable grander than the Grand Canyon both in width and depth.

9. Xcaret Park, Cancun

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A privately owned eco-tourism resort, Xcaret Park is located on the Caribbean’s Rivera Maya. In addition to its coral reefs, crystal clear water, and fine sandy beaches, Xcaret the namesake of the Pre-Columbian Maya that built a settlement there more than 1,800 years ago.

10. Palenque

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Palenque is home of some of the largest and most well preserved Mayan ruins in Central America. Thought to have been built around 700 A.D., Palenque’s pyramids offer sunset views out over the jungle.

11. Agua Azul Waterfalls

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Cascading turquoise-colored mineral has created a series of cataracts that fall into the pools below. Some of the falls are more than 20-feet high and the river itself is more than 100 yards wide.

12. Todos Santos

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According to Forbes Magazine, Todos Santos is Mexico’s best-kept secret. Just north of Cabo on the Baja Peninsula, Todos Santos is renowned for its peaceful setting and long, unbroken beaches.

13. Acapulco

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There is not a bad view in Acapulco. With the Sierra Madre del Sur Mountains behind it and the Pacific Ocean in front, Acapulco has long been a favorite of Mexican and international visitors alike.

14. Ixtapa

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In the Mexican state of Guerrero, Ixtapa is the ideal resort town. The El Palmar Beach has one skyrise after another with views looking over the ocean. Still, Ixtapa is still a fishing village at heart which means there is always a plethora of fresh fish at the local market.

15. Isla Mujeres

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An island in the Caribbean sea, Isla Mujeres is famous for unparalleled snorkelling and diving. The beach eases out into the water and in some places a person can walk out into the ocean for a half a mile before needing to swim.

16. Playa de Carmen

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On the Rivera Maya, Playa de Carmen is the ideal Caribbean town. The beaches are lined with miles of palms and the ocean offers world-class snorkelling and diving. And, the town of Playa de Carmen has a bustling nightlife.

17. Puerto Escondido

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Puerto Escondido — the “hidden port” — is a stunning area with coral reefs and rock formations hammered by crystal clear water. Underdeveloped in relation to many of Mexico’s other resort towns, Puerto Escondido is the definition of peace.

18. The Marieta Islands

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The Marieta Islands are a natural wonder. Located several miles off the coast of Punta Mita, the Marieta Islands were formed over millions of years by coral.

19. Puerto Penasco

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Puerto Penasco is wildly famous as it is one of the few places in Arizona where the Sea of Cortez touches the four-corners state. Though the town is more developed than most Mexican resort towns, Puerto Penasco offers beautiful sunset views. 

20. Sierra de Los Tuxtlas

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Sierra de Los Tuxtlas is in tropical Mexico at the southern end, Caribbean side. A massive range of mountains, the Sierra de Los Tuxtlas may be the most beautiful of Mexico’s long list of mountain ranges.

21.  Sierra Madre de Oaxaca

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North of the Sierra de Los Tuxtlas mountain range, the Sierra Madre de Oaxaca range is larger in scale and includes even higher mountains. While not as tropical, the Sierra Madre de Oaxaca mountains are home to some of Mexico’s most beautiful sunset views.

Here Are Some Quick Facts You Should Know About Santeria

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Here Are Some Quick Facts You Should Know About Santeria

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If you grew up listening to Sublime’s “Santería” at high school dances or hanging out at block parties, odds are the song’s opening lyrics of “I don’t practice Santería, I ain’t got no crystal ball” might have been the first time you heard of the mystical cult. Santería is a religion that came to the Caribbean islands by way of Africans brought to the islands in the slave trade against their will. They blended their native religion with Catholicism, practiced by the Spanish conquistadors and colonizers to practice their beliefs without persecution.

Santería is a religion with West African roots and influenced by Roman Catholicism.

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The religion has been around for centuries, since the first existence of slaves on the  Caribbean islands. African slaves brought their spiritual practices of Voodoo with them to the New World. However, under Spanish rule at the time, the slaves were not allowed to practice their own religion so they had to integrate Catholic saints to mask their religion. While Santería is the most common name but it isn’t the only one. Santería is the name used to reference the African/Caribbean religion in pop culture and the media. Practitioners prefer the other terms for the practice often referring to it as Regla de Ocha, La Regla de Ifá, or Lucumí.

Another important distinction to note is that it is not equal to brujería.

Santeros are known as priests and conduct the ceremonies, which often include drumming and dancing. There are no official buildings or meeting places for Santería. The religion and traditions often take place in homes, outdoors or in places rented or secured for the specific ceremony that will be taking place.

To understand the history of the Regla de Ocho is to go back and understand how the Yoruba people in Cuba.

who were mistakenly referred to as the Lucumí people (which one site mentions is perhaps this tribe referred to each other as Oluku Mi, meaning “my friend”), practiced both their traditional religious customs in parallel unison with the new Roman Catholicism religion practiced by the Spaniards at the time. The main pillars of this religion includes the worship of one god in three beings: Oludumare, Olofi, and Olorun, as well as the worship of Orichas, or santos. This shows the similarity between the Catholic religion of God having three forms: God, the Holy Spirit and Jesus Christ, as well as saints in Roman Catholicism. Some Catholic images, saints and practices are also mixed into the Regla de Ocho practices.

Santeros practiced in secret for hundreds of years to avoid religious persecution.

Santería has practitioners in the Carribean and across Latin America as followers brought these practices to other parts of the world, such as Brazil. However, the practices changed in variation from one country to the next. In recent years, it has been growing in U.S. cities with larger populations of African and Latin American immigrants. One such city is Miami, which has endured some odd cases of animal sacrifice in plain sight of its neighborhood residences.

The sacrifices are seen as offerings to the orichas and then eaten.

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The religion has been characterized by prejudice by people who see it as barbaric or voodoo (it is not voodoo, as the practices come from different tribes in Africa) and has also been at the center of a U.S. Supreme Court case. A santero and college professor goes deeper into the practices’ history in a PBS documentary titled, Santería. In 2014, after the Lucumí faith won its religious freedom in the Supreme Court case, two of its largest priest organizations joined together in Miami to form one hierarchy and establish more visibility and awareness of the religion among its followers and outsiders.

The recent court case wins and development shows it is a young religion that is continuing to evolve and grow among its followers.


READ: These Santería Stories From Miami Took Sad And Dark Turns For Everyone Involved

Did you learn something new about this religious practice? Let us know in the comments below.

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