Culture

For Frida Kahlo’s Birthday This Is An Ode To All Of The Cakes Made In Her Honor

Mexican painter Frida Kahlo has long been one of the most recognizable global icons to come out of Latin America. The fierce Chicana was a deep poet and woman with an uncanny ability to communicate the many pains and joys of life through painting. Her life was full of struggle and love: she was sick for as long as she could remember, and her love life was repleted with ups and downs revolving around her relationship with fellow painter Diego Rivera. 

Throughout the world and the decades, she has inspired other painters, writers, filmmakers, and musicians to continue with her aesthetic legacy, which combines purely Mexican elements with fierce and unapologetic femininity. But she has also inspired bakers who create cakes that feature our great Frida and that encapsulates her philosophy: Viva la vida. Long live life! 

1. “I love you more than my own skin”, Frida told Diego, and we are sure he thought her skin was as sweet as this cake

Credit: Instagram. @le_macaron_magique

This cake’s autumn colors are cozy and also echo the deep orange hues of mamey, the most Mexican of fruits. We love it! 

2. If we were to title this beauty, we would use one of Fridita’s quotes: “I was a child who went about in a world of colors… “. This cake gives us all the childhood vibes. 

Credit: Instagram. @mariadulcepasteleria

Just look at this cake: it looks like a canvas splattered with oil during a crazy night of mezcal and fandango. Oh, yes!

3. This cake rinde tributo to Frida’s own favorite assets: “The most important part of the body is the brain. Of my face, I like the eyebrows and eyes” 

Credit: Instagram. @cakesbytriciafaye

The iconic eyebrows defied notions of Western beauty and have become an iconic visual element in Latino popular culture. 

4. “I leave you my portrait so that you will have my presence all the days and nights that I am away from you”… and she left us her sweet spirit as a source of baking inspiration

Credit: Instagram. @dolce_danai

Frida loved animals. Diego and her kept xolos, traditional Aztec dogs, and monkeys. This cute design celebrates her love for all living things. 

5. A soul that was full of wisdom: “At the end of the day, we can endure much more than we think we can.” And a slice of nice cake can help us celebrate one more year, eh?

Credit: Instagram. @sweetcakelaguna

Besides her self portraits, this is perhaps the most iconic Frida image that exists. A photo that captures her defiant, yet wise attitude towards life. What a great way to use it on a cake. 

6. “I paint flowers so they will not die”, she said, and this cake is like spring on a plate

Credit: Instagram. @sweetcakescapes

Red lips, black eyebrows and the flowers that Frida adored in life: nothing else is needed. 

7. “Feet, what do I need you for when I have wings to fly?”, said Frida, and this mariposa monarca does her philosophy justice

Credit: Instagram. @pasteleriamoonberry

We love the monarch butterfly that crowns this cake. It reminds us of how Frida personified personal transformation. 

8. Viva la vida! 

Credit: Instagram. @macarella_tap

This cake features the iconic blue house in which Frida and Diego created a universe of passion, occasional jealousy and passion for the arts.  

9. We take this edible Frida figurine over a gringa Barbie anyday

Credit: Instagram. @cupcakescaropreve

Simple, and perhaps not the most elaborate design, but it has a rustic quality that we adore. We are sure that the birthday girl was so pleased. 

10. Look at that cute face: mischievous like our glorious painter

Credit: Instagram. @chantilli_pastry

This cute iteration of Frida gives us all the feelings. Ideal for a little girl’s party!

11. “I paint self-portraits because I am so often alone because I am the person I know best”, said Friducha, and this cake le rinde tributo

Credit: Instagram. @artsydesigncakes

This is a bit uncanny…. un poco raro, but we love the David Lynch quality of the cake, the figurine and la festejada

12. Katerine is one lucky birthday girl: can we just eat those pearls already?

Credit: Instagram. @leticiasbakery

Those edible pearls really give this Frida cake an elegant touch. We would love to enjoy a slice of this baby with a bottle of bubbly!

13. Papier mache and Frida: yes, porfis 

Credit: Instagram. @cakesfromparis

Papel mache is one of the key elements of Mexican handicrafts, and this cake uses it to create an amazingly vibrant headpiece that screams “Fiesta!”. 

14. Look at this beauty, a huge floral arrangement that reminds us of a night in Oaxaca listening to huapango

Credit: Instagram. @tercerpiso_reposteria

One of our favorites. The red hues remind us of Oaxaca, a region that Frida adored and that is home to some of the most famous Mexican painters of all time, such as Francisco Toledo and Rufino Tamayo. 

15. What about this cute and very Mexican creation? We are not sure if we wanna eat it or cuddle with it

Credit: Instagram. @docesgatto

This is like a mix of Day of the Death and Frida aesthetics, a sort of Frida calaverita. We just want to sink our forks and teeth into it! 

16. We adore this minimalist design, elegant purple and the eyebrows that have inspired generations of Latinas

Credit: Instagram. @karmasworldpr

Those cejas preciosas again! And those golden edible earrings… hope the celebrado got to eat them! 

17. Oh, such a sexy cake, almost as sexy as Frida’s thoughts on carnal pleasure: “Take a lover who looks at you like maybe you are a bourbon biscuit”

Credit: Instagram. @tatanasbakery

One of the most unique Frida cakes we found, The bouquet on top makes the cake worth it by itself, but the red cheeks spell all kinds of delicious. 

18. This cake for 100 guests is the best culinary representation of what Frida thought about what mattered in life: “Nothing is worth more than laughter”

Credit: Instagram. @tatanasbakery

Can you imagine the faces of pure delight that the 100 people that ate this cake saw this beauty being cracked open, revealing its chocolate and Nutella, lemon and berries interior? Drooling! 

19. A Frida cake and books, doesn’t get better than this. She was an intelligent, fierce, independent woman who said: “I am my own muse”

Credit: Instagram. @juditvasa

We can almost smell el cafecito de olla being brewed for the celebrada and the guests, and the smell of books and wood on a cold, rainy afternoon, 

20. Last, but certainly not least, our favorite… just look at that fierce woman and this piece of fine culinary art

Credit: Instagram. @thecakerydesign

This is such an elegant design, inspired by pop art and featuring the deep eyes of Frida Kahlo, a woman like no other, a woman who contained multitudes. The eyes of a woman who said: “I must fight with all my strength so that the little positive things that my health allows me to do might be pointed toward helping the revolution. The only real reason for living.” The world would be much better with more individuals like her. 

From Mordida To Having Enough Beer To Fill A Stadium, Mexican Birthday Parties For Kids Are Where The Real People Turn Up

Culture

From Mordida To Having Enough Beer To Fill A Stadium, Mexican Birthday Parties For Kids Are Where The Real People Turn Up

There are tons of perks to getting older. You’re finally allowed to do all the things you couldn’t wait to do when growing up. You have more personal freedoms and — with every year you get another opportunity to celebrate your birthday. As awesome as these events can be, they never quite live up to the birthday parties of our childhoods. 

The piñatas, the presents, the pastel — these celebrations were really one of a kind and have set the standard for all the merry-making of our lives. There’s really nothing like the gatherings of our early years and we have plenty of fond memories that prove that our childhood birthday parties really couldn’t be beat when it came to food, fun and family.

1. Getting to go all out with your birthday outfit.

Instagram / @cant_read_cause_im_blind

Just like our parties nowadays, birthdays are an occasion to show out with our best looks. Back then it might have meant appearing in your prettiest princess dress or whatever outfit you had to grab everyone’s attention. Whatever it was, it needed to let the whole party know that they were there for your big day. 

2. Having your party be an excuse for a mini-family reunion. 

Twitter / @GeorgeDomimguez

Your birthday party was basically an excuse for your parents to invite every adult they knew. That mostly meant an invite to family members you couldn’t really remember. This wasn’t a problem, though. After all, more guests means more presents. 

3. Getting cash slipped to you as you greet all your tias and tios.

Pinterest.com

Speaking of presents, remember when your older family members would causally slip you the best birthday present there is. We’re talking about cold, hard cash. Your birthday party was the one day of the year where your mom didn’t have to nag you about saying “hi” to everyone. You were already ready to get that green even if it meant letting all the tias pinch your cheeks. 

4. Going wild with your primos in the bounce house.

Instagram / @njtoddleradventures

The bounce house is a staple at any birthday party but they really posed an opportunity for us to go wild as kids. This wasn’t meant to be a relaxing jump; most of the time we were honestly trying to tip this thing over.

5. Taking that same energy to the dance floor when your favorite song came on.

Instagram / @aferzystka

Another place that we were able to let loose was the dance floor. Back then, it didn’t matter if we didn’t know the dance moves or didn’t have the rhythm down. All that mattered was that we were tiring ourselves out and working up an appetite. 

6. The overwhelming amount of food your family prepared.

Twitter / @carliannvela

Speaking of being hungry, if there’s one thing that our culture appreciates, it’s food. Back in the day, we all had bottomless stomachs and didn’t have to worry about la dieta. Those were the days. 

7. Having more beer than kids at the party.

Twitter / @bluestripzjulio

It didn’t seem strange when we were kids, but it definitely makes us laugh now. Growing up, there was always an excess of cerveza at every party we went to. Be it baby shower or christening, beer was always in supply but no time more than during our childhood birthday parties. Now we’re the one’s bring the six-packs into the parties.  

8. Whacking that piñata filled with all your favorite candy.

Twitter / @ririgreeena

No party is complete without a piñata. Who among us doesn’t have a picture like this from one of our parties. While most of us are now on piñata duty, back then we got to take out our aggression by whacking the candy out of these party staples. 

9. Having all your drunken tios singing “Happy Birthday” to you.

Instagram / @blue_eyez1333

Back during these childhood birthdays, we would have to sit through “Happy Birthday” in both English and Spanish. Sometimes, “Las Mañanitas” was also brought out depending how drunk the tios were. Now, when we suffer through that as adults, it’s usually our friends drunkenly singing to us. 

10. That one family member that just had to smash your face into the cake. 

Twitter / @celestefayala

Some things you never grow out of and this is one of them. We call this a birthday facial and the sooner you get it over with, the sooner we can eat some cake. 

11. Surviving a cascarones battle with all the other kids (and some of the adults).

Instagram / @vankoran

Cascarones are the colorful, confetti-filled eggs that Mexicans have during Easter and at birthday parties. You definitely don’t miss these if you were the kid all the other kids targeted. We’ve still got confetti in our hair from our last cascaron battle. 

12. Having tons of pictures taken of you all throughout the party.

Instagram / @callmesabrina

Having a whole group of people yell at you to smile while blinding you with flashes doesn’t seem like it would be a fond memory but it is. Maybe that’s why we love taking selfies so much.

13. Planning next years party before your last guest even leaves the house.

Instagram / @thealarconlife

One year down and, hopefully, many more to go. When we were kids, we never minded growing older. Catch us at the next children’s birthday party, reliving these memories as adults.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z6x5jSCNE2w&t=3s

A New Exhibition Will Unveil The Rocky Relationship Between Frida Kahlo And Diego Rivera

Entertainment

A New Exhibition Will Unveil The Rocky Relationship Between Frida Kahlo And Diego Rivera

An exhibition on the esteemed Mexican artists, lovers, and icons Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera is coming to North Carolina. On October 26, the North Carolina Museum of Art will open the Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera, and Mexican Modernism from the Jacques and Natasha Gelman Collection. The anticipated exhibition will include paintings, drawings, photography and film that aims to capture the 20th century artists’ bodies of work as well as their friendships and conflicts with political figures and their own impassioned and tumultuous personal relationships.

“Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera, and Mexican Modernism from the Jacques and Natasha Gelman Collection will emphasize a remarkable chapter in art history that is at once Mexican and global,” museum director Valerie Hillings told the ArtfixDaily, a publication covering curated art news.

Today, their tempestuous relationship is as famous as some of the artists’ most popular works. 

fridakahlo / Instagram

Kahlo and Rivera met in June 1928 at a party thrown by photographer Tina Modotti. At the time, a young, bold Kahlo asked Rivera to look at her paintings to see if he thought that she had enough talent to succeed. Rivera, impressed by her work, later spoke about that encounter, saying, “It was obvious to me that this girl was an authentic artist.” The pair soon started a relationship, though Rivera was 20 years older than Kahlo and already had two common-law wives. It was the start to a messy, atypical romance.

Marrying at a civil ceremony at the town hall of Coyoacán in 1929, despite the disapproval of Kahlo’s mother, their marriage included immense heartbreak. 

fridakahlo / Instagram

Over the years, the couple experienced and fought over everything from failed abortions and miscarriages to ailing physical health, to extra-marital affairs, including same-gender relationships from the gender-bending Kahlo. In 1939, the couple even divorced, only to remarry a year later with little change in their passionate yet rocky affair. Aside from the infidelity, rage, and distress that brewed in their personal relationship, the pair was often also at odds with political leaders as well. As communists, the revolutionary nature of Rivera’s murals, as well as Kahlo’s self-portraits and party affiliations, often put them at odds with political and religious leaders.

“Diego Rivera’s personality, politics, and monumental, social realist murals made him a celebrity during his lifetime. While he once overshadowed his equally talented wife, Frida Kahlo’s fame has far outstripped her husband’s in the years since her death,” Hillings added.

The pieces presented at the exhibition come from the long-time collection of Jacques and Natasha Gelman. According to ArtfixDaily, the Gelmans became Mexican citizens in 1942 and at the time started amassing Mexican art. Their collection includes Mexican modernists, like Kahlo and Rivera, who became friends with the Gelmans, as well as their compatriots Rufino Tamayo, David Alfaro Siqueiros and more. 

The exhibition was organized by the Vergel Foundation and MondoMostre in collaboration with the Instituto Nacional de Bellas Artes y Literatura (INBAL). It is a joint project between the North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources; the North Carolina Museum of Art Foundation, Inc.; and the William R. Kenan Jr. Endowment for Educational Exhibitions. It includes research from the Ann and Jim Goodnight/The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Fund for Curatorial and Conservation Research and Travel.

The North Carolina Museum of Art is presenting the exhibition alongside the Luces y Sombras: Images of Mexico | Photographs from the Bank of America Collection. 

Together, the fall exhibitions “celebrate these artists’ culture of origin as well as the diverse sources of influence they drew upon in creating their distinctive oeuvres,” Hillings said.

While the museum is commemorating the famed Mexican couple, not everyone is excited about the pair’s legacy. The fall exhibition comes weeks after the new U.S. ambassador to Mexico Christopher Landau criticized Kahlo for her support of Marxism, stirring controversy on social media. The ambassador, who was appointed by President Donald Trump and sworn in last month, took to Twitter last week after visiting the late Kahlo’s home, La Casa Azul, in Mexico City.

“I admire her free and bohemian spirit, and she rightly became an icon of Mexico around the whole world. What I do not understand is her obvious passion for Marxism, Leninism, Stalinism. Didn’t she know about the horrors committed in the name of that ideology?” he wrote in Spanish. 

His comments immediately drew backlash from thousands of people.

fridakahlo / Instagram

Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera, and Mexican Modernism from the Jacques and Natasha Gelman Collection runs at the North Carolina Museum of Art through January 19, 2020. To recognize the native language and cultural heritage of the artists in the exhibition, gallery information will be provided in both English and Spanish.

Tickets are already available for members but will be sold to nonmembers starting on September 17. 

Read: US Ambassador Insults Mexican Icon Frida Kahlo And Mexicans Clapped Back