Culture

For Frida Kahlo’s Birthday This Is An Ode To All Of The Cakes Made In Her Honor

Mexican painter Frida Kahlo has long been one of the most recognizable global icons to come out of Latin America. The fierce Chicana was a deep poet and woman with an uncanny ability to communicate the many pains and joys of life through painting. Her life was full of struggle and love: she was sick for as long as she could remember, and her love life was repleted with ups and downs revolving around her relationship with fellow painter Diego Rivera. 

Throughout the world and the decades, she has inspired other painters, writers, filmmakers, and musicians to continue with her aesthetic legacy, which combines purely Mexican elements with fierce and unapologetic femininity. But she has also inspired bakers who create cakes that feature our great Frida and that encapsulates her philosophy: Viva la vida. Long live life! 

1. “I love you more than my own skin”, Frida told Diego, and we are sure he thought her skin was as sweet as this cake

Credit: Instagram. @le_macaron_magique

This cake’s autumn colors are cozy and also echo the deep orange hues of mamey, the most Mexican of fruits. We love it! 

2. If we were to title this beauty, we would use one of Fridita’s quotes: “I was a child who went about in a world of colors… “. This cake gives us all the childhood vibes. 

Credit: Instagram. @mariadulcepasteleria

Just look at this cake: it looks like a canvas splattered with oil during a crazy night of mezcal and fandango. Oh, yes!

3. This cake rinde tributo to Frida’s own favorite assets: “The most important part of the body is the brain. Of my face, I like the eyebrows and eyes” 

Credit: Instagram. @cakesbytriciafaye

The iconic eyebrows defied notions of Western beauty and have become an iconic visual element in Latino popular culture. 

4. “I leave you my portrait so that you will have my presence all the days and nights that I am away from you”… and she left us her sweet spirit as a source of baking inspiration

Credit: Instagram. @dolce_danai

Frida loved animals. Diego and her kept xolos, traditional Aztec dogs, and monkeys. This cute design celebrates her love for all living things. 

5. A soul that was full of wisdom: “At the end of the day, we can endure much more than we think we can.” And a slice of nice cake can help us celebrate one more year, eh?

Credit: Instagram. @sweetcakelaguna

Besides her self portraits, this is perhaps the most iconic Frida image that exists. A photo that captures her defiant, yet wise attitude towards life. What a great way to use it on a cake. 

6. “I paint flowers so they will not die”, she said, and this cake is like spring on a plate

Credit: Instagram. @sweetcakescapes

Red lips, black eyebrows and the flowers that Frida adored in life: nothing else is needed. 

7. “Feet, what do I need you for when I have wings to fly?”, said Frida, and this mariposa monarca does her philosophy justice

Credit: Instagram. @pasteleriamoonberry

We love the monarch butterfly that crowns this cake. It reminds us of how Frida personified personal transformation. 

8. Viva la vida! 

Credit: Instagram. @macarella_tap

This cake features the iconic blue house in which Frida and Diego created a universe of passion, occasional jealousy and passion for the arts.  

9. We take this edible Frida figurine over a gringa Barbie anyday

Credit: Instagram. @cupcakescaropreve

Simple, and perhaps not the most elaborate design, but it has a rustic quality that we adore. We are sure that the birthday girl was so pleased. 

10. Look at that cute face: mischievous like our glorious painter

Credit: Instagram. @chantilli_pastry

This cute iteration of Frida gives us all the feelings. Ideal for a little girl’s party!

11. “I paint self-portraits because I am so often alone because I am the person I know best”, said Friducha, and this cake le rinde tributo

Credit: Instagram. @artsydesigncakes

This is a bit uncanny…. un poco raro, but we love the David Lynch quality of the cake, the figurine and la festejada

12. Katerine is one lucky birthday girl: can we just eat those pearls already?

Credit: Instagram. @leticiasbakery

Those edible pearls really give this Frida cake an elegant touch. We would love to enjoy a slice of this baby with a bottle of bubbly!

13. Papier mache and Frida: yes, porfis 

Credit: Instagram. @cakesfromparis

Papel mache is one of the key elements of Mexican handicrafts, and this cake uses it to create an amazingly vibrant headpiece that screams “Fiesta!”. 

14. Look at this beauty, a huge floral arrangement that reminds us of a night in Oaxaca listening to huapango

Credit: Instagram. @tercerpiso_reposteria

One of our favorites. The red hues remind us of Oaxaca, a region that Frida adored and that is home to some of the most famous Mexican painters of all time, such as Francisco Toledo and Rufino Tamayo. 

15. What about this cute and very Mexican creation? We are not sure if we wanna eat it or cuddle with it

Credit: Instagram. @docesgatto

This is like a mix of Day of the Death and Frida aesthetics, a sort of Frida calaverita. We just want to sink our forks and teeth into it! 

16. We adore this minimalist design, elegant purple and the eyebrows that have inspired generations of Latinas

Credit: Instagram. @karmasworldpr

Those cejas preciosas again! And those golden edible earrings… hope the celebrado got to eat them! 

17. Oh, such a sexy cake, almost as sexy as Frida’s thoughts on carnal pleasure: “Take a lover who looks at you like maybe you are a bourbon biscuit”

Credit: Instagram. @tatanasbakery

One of the most unique Frida cakes we found, The bouquet on top makes the cake worth it by itself, but the red cheeks spell all kinds of delicious. 

18. This cake for 100 guests is the best culinary representation of what Frida thought about what mattered in life: “Nothing is worth more than laughter”

Credit: Instagram. @tatanasbakery

Can you imagine the faces of pure delight that the 100 people that ate this cake saw this beauty being cracked open, revealing its chocolate and Nutella, lemon and berries interior? Drooling! 

19. A Frida cake and books, doesn’t get better than this. She was an intelligent, fierce, independent woman who said: “I am my own muse”

Credit: Instagram. @juditvasa

We can almost smell el cafecito de olla being brewed for the celebrada and the guests, and the smell of books and wood on a cold, rainy afternoon, 

20. Last, but certainly not least, our favorite… just look at that fierce woman and this piece of fine culinary art

Credit: Instagram. @thecakerydesign

This is such an elegant design, inspired by pop art and featuring the deep eyes of Frida Kahlo, a woman like no other, a woman who contained multitudes. The eyes of a woman who said: “I must fight with all my strength so that the little positive things that my health allows me to do might be pointed toward helping the revolution. The only real reason for living.” The world would be much better with more individuals like her. 

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Reports Of A New Series Depicting The Life Of Frida Kahlo Has The Internet Asking All Sorts Of Questions

Entertainment

Reports Of A New Series Depicting The Life Of Frida Kahlo Has The Internet Asking All Sorts Of Questions

Getty Images

There are few people in this world that are as iconic as Frida Kahlo. She’s captured the minds and imaginations of generations of people from all over the world. We’ve seen her story told before, including on the big screen, but fans have long awaited a Netflix rendition of the artists unique story and now it seem like we may finally be getting what so many of us have wanted for so long.

The Frida Kahlo Corporation is developing a TV drama series based on the artist’s storied life.

Acording to a report by Deadline, the Frida Kahlo Corporation is working with a media company and famed Venezuelan composer and singer Carlos Baute to produce a drama series following the life of the iconic artist.

Frida Kahlo has inspired and influenced fans around the world and has had a major impact on the Latinx diaspora, the art world, feminism and culture as a whole. So, it seems that producers are pulling out all the stops to make sure they do right by the artist.

The series is being written by Latino talent, lead by Joel Novoa and Marilú Godinez. Novoa, who has worked on Arrow, Blood and Treasure and the feature film God’s Slave is attached to direct. The partnership will create a slate of content to celebrate the life of Frida Kahlo in different genres.

“The idea is to talk about what the books don’t,” said the writing duo in a joint statement. “The subtext behind each painting, the richness of Mexico’s 20th century and the revolution. Themes that are incredibly relevant at this unprecedented time.”

Carlos Dorado of the Frida Kahlo Corporation added, “Frida Kahlo corporation is always looking for talented people who know how to exalt the life of an icon like Frida Kahlo. In this case the professional team that has been formed is distinguished by its great professionalism, experience and most importantly the sensitivity to be able to approach a project as important and transcendental as Frida Kahlo. This high professional team will always have the support of Frida Kahlo Corporation.”

So when can we expect to see a series about one of the world’s greatest artists and feminist icons?

The team expects to start production of the series during the second half of 2021. A studio has already shown interest and the presentation of the project to the market is expected to occur in February.

“We are currently developing and writing the basis of the series and expect to be ready to present the project in the upcoming weeks,” the team said in a statement.

Also, why has it taken so long?!

Should the series find a studio and distributor, this would be the first drama series focusing on Kahlo in recent history. It’s been almost twenty years since her story was told on the big screen, when Salma Hayek portrayed the icon in the 2002 film Frida. That film went on to earn six Oscar nominations, winning for Best Makeup and Best Original Score. More recently, Kahlo was voiced by Natalia Cordova-Buckley in the Oscar-winning Pixar pic Coco. 

In addition to this, in 2019 it was announced that there would be an animated film about the painter.

But fans of the iconic feminist and artist have long hoped to see a TV series depicting her larger than life personality and role in shaping the world we live in today and it looks like we may finally get what we’ve asked for.

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If You Call Yourself A Frida Kahlo Fan Then You Should Be Following These Five Artists

Culture

If You Call Yourself A Frida Kahlo Fan Then You Should Be Following These Five Artists

Bettman Archives / Getty Images

So many of us have been moved the art of the late Frida Kahlo. Even in death she’s gone on to inspire entire generations with her Surrealist self-portraits, lush depictions of plant and animal life, and magical realist tableaux. Not to mention her incredible life story.

She also inspired future generations of artists, many of whom are alive today creating beautiful works of art. These are just a few of the artists who have similar techniques, subjects, and styles to Frida Kahlo that you’ll definitely love if you’re a fan of Frida Kahlo.

Maria Fragoso – Mexico City

Credit: Teach Me Sweet Things / Theirry Goldberg Gallery

Influenced by the style and narratives of Mexican surrealists and muralists, Maria Fragoso creates work that celebrates her Mexican culture, while also addressing notions of gender expression and queer identity. Her brightly colored canvases offer voyeuristic glimpses into intimate moments, with subjects engaging in acts that seem at once seductive and mischievous—often while gazing directly out at the viewer.

Recently featured in Forbes’s “30 Under 30” in the “Art and Style” category, the 25-year-old artist is quickly rising to prominence. Born and raised in Mexico City, Fragoso moved to Baltimore in 2015 to pursue her BFA at the Maryland Institute College of Art. While in school, Fragoso was the recipient of the Ellen Battell Stoeckel Fellowship at the Yale Norfolk School of Art. Since graduating, she has completed residencies at Palazzo Monti and the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture.

Nadia Waheed – Austin, Texas

Credit: Message from Janus / Mindy Solomon Gallery

Born in Saudi Arabia to Pakistani parents, Austin, Texas–based artist Nadia Waheed explores notions of relocation, displacement, and vulnerability in her work. Her life-size figurative paintings are both allegorical and autobiographical—the female figures represent her own lived experiences, as well as the multifaceted identities of all women.

Rodeo Tapaya – Philippines

Credit: Nowhere Man / A3 Art Agency

Rodel Tapaya paints dreamlike, narrative works based on myths and folklore from his native Philippines. Drawing parallels between age-old fables and current events, Tapaya reimagines mythical tales by incorporating fragments of the present. “In some way, I realize that old stories are not just metaphors. I can find connections with contemporary time,” Tapaya said in a 2017 interview with the National Gallery of Australia. “It’s like the myths are poetic narrations of the present.”

While the content of Tapaya’s work is inspired by Filipino culture, his style and literary-based practice is heavily influenced by Mexican muralists and Surrealist painters such as José Clemente Orozco, Diego Rivera, and, of course, Frida Kahlo. Often working at a large scale, Tapaya has been commissioned to create several site-specific murals, including one for Art Fair Philippines in February 2020.

Leonor Fini – Buenos Aires

Credit: Les Aveugles / Weinstein Gallery

Long overlooked in favor of male Surrealists, Leonor Fini, a contemporary of Kahlo, was a pioneering 20th-century force. Known for having lived boldly, Fini is recognized for her unconventional lifestyle, theatrical personality, and avant-garde fashion sense. Born in Buenos Aires in 1907, Fini was raised by her mother in Trieste, Italy. She taught herself to paint and first exhibited her work at the age of 17.

Fini had one of her first solo exhibitions at age 25 with a Parisian gallery directed by Christian Dior. Her work was then included in the groundbreaking exhibition “Fantastic Art, Dada and Surrealism” at MoMA in 1936, while at the same time she had her first New York exhibition with Julien Levy Gallery. Today, Fini’s work is represented in many major public collections including the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, Tate Modern in London, the Centre Pompidou in Paris, and the Peggy Guggenheim Collection in Venice.

Ramon Alejandro – Miami

Credit: Eternal Life / Latino Art Core

José Ramón Díaz Alejandro, better known as Ramon Alejandro, paints idyllic still lifes of tropical fruits set in ethereal landscapes. The surrealistic compositions have a similar spirit to Kahlo’s less iconic but equally masterful still-life works

Coming from a long lineage of artists, Alejandro grew up with the artworks of his great-grandfather, grandfather, and uncle adorning the walls of his childhood home. After growing up in Havana, Alejandro was sent to live in Argentina in 1960 amidst political turmoil in Cuba, and has continued to live in exile since then.

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