Culture

17 Latin Dog Breeds You Should Beg Your Mom To Let You Have

When we think of Latinx culture, we don’t typically think of pets as the first thing central to our household lifestyle. With thousands of dogs in need of a home, here are some Latin American dog breeds for you and your mom to aww over and who knows, maybe she would even cave in and be up to adopt.

1. Peruvian Hairless Dog

Credit: Peruvian Hairless Dog. Digital Image. DogsAholic.

Known for being loyal and loving, the Peruvian Hairless dog will surely the best part of your day. Fun fact: perceived as an Incan dog, they were also kept as pets during Pre-Inca cultures.

2. Uruguayan Cimarrón

Credit: Cimarrón Uruguayo. Digital Image. Dogs For Show.

As the only native dog of Uruguay, people take great pride when having the Cimarrón as a pet. They make excellent candidates in dog competitions as well as for hunting and guarding.

3. Argentine Dogo

Credit: Dogo Argentino. Digital Image. Dogo Breeders.

Strong and smart, the Dogo Argentino is one reliable breed where it is willing to protect its human companion and show off a brave attitude.

4. Chihuahua

Credit: Chihuahua. Digital Image. Vet Street.

Tiny but mighty, Chihuahuas tend to put up on heck of a fight, whether when playing with other dogs or chasing off humans. If you have a spunky personality, then this breed may be for you.

5. Brazilian Mastiff

@dukey_and_lucky / Instagram / Digital Image / July 26, 2018

The Brazilian Mastiff has great tracking abilities and is very good at being a guard dog. They will always have you feeling safe while making a great cuddle buddy.

6. Chilean Fox Terrier

Credit: Chilean Fox Terrier. Digital Image. Vet Street.

It takes a while for this breed to warm to you but once it does, it is non-stop loving. They are growing popular in South America too so they might be even easier to spot out.

7. Havanese

Credit: Havanese. Digital Image. Wag!

Add on extra cheer to your life with a Cuban native Havanese dog. They can adapt to their surroundings so they are the perfect companion no matter where you are.

8. Brazilian Terrier

@sofalex_kennel / Instagram / Digital Image / July 26, 2018

Smart and playful, the Brazilian Terrier is a dog that is always on the go. Definitely one you take for a run or some exercise.

9. Xoloitzcuintle

@xolito_magico / Instagram / Digital Image / July 26, 2018

Also known as the Mexican Hairless Dog, this is a rare breed that has been around for a long time. Known for its hyper personality, they are quite fun for the outgoing.

10. Double-Nosed Andean Tiger Hound

Credit: @SkyNews / Twitter

Double the nose, double the pros. First, by having the Double Nosed Andean Tiger Hound, you would have a rare breed from Bolivia. Second, their nose is what makes them special as no other breed is like them.

11. Mucuchí

Credit: Mucuchies. Digital Image. Adworks.Pk

This breed is well known for its white coat and for always being alert. They don’t call them the Venezuelan Sheepdog for nothing.

12. Guatemalan Dogo

Credit: Guatemalan Dogo. Digital Image. Dog Breed Info

Guatemala’s national dog, they are not only for companionship but also to serve and guard their families. They are also open to the friends of families bring your loved ones to meet this furry friend.

13. Ecuadorian Hairless Dog

Credit: Ecuadorian Hairless Dog. Digital Image. Wikipedia.

Coming from the Peruvian Hairless Dog, it is now one of the rarest breeds of dogs. Its body proportions allow it to be considered an elegant animal, and perhaps can reflect its shine on its owner.

14. Mexican Pitbull

Credit: luisnaex / Instagram

Also known as Chamuco, the origin gives the meaning “devil” to represent its fierce personality. A fighting dog, it can remain friendly and confident around humans.

15. Magellan Sheepdog

Credit: @thisisChile / Twitter

The Magellan Sheepdog can handle a lot of outdoor activities, such as snow temperatures, traveling long distance, and, as noted in its name, is able to herd sheep.

Read : These Photos Of Celebs With Their Beautiful Fur Babies Will Melt Your Heart Because, Duh

16. Argentine Pila Dog

Credit: Argentine Pila Dog. Digital Image. Pet Finder.

Due to its small size, Argentine Pila Dog is able to adapt into the apartment life quite easily. This makes the dog breed very easy to train.

Read : 20 Bizarre Animals You Can Only Find In Latin America

17. Rastreador Brasileiro

@theogoldenlata / Instagram / Digital Image / July 26, 2018

Not usually kept as a pet, the Rastreador Brasileiro is a hunting dog that should not be near children and the elderly. However, with enough patience, they can be trained.


READ: 18 Must-See Locations When You Visit Guadalajara


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This Mexican College Student Is Going Viral For Breeding the Largest Bunnies In the World

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This Mexican College Student Is Going Viral For Breeding the Largest Bunnies In the World

Photo via yakinkiro/Instagram

Look out Bad Bunny. There’s another breed of bunny in town that’s taking the internet by storm. A college student in Mexico recently went viral for the oddest thing. He has genetically engineered a strain of rabbits to be the largest in the world.

21-year-old Kiro Yakin has become a viral sensation after internet users have seen him with pictures of the giant bunnies he genetically engineered.

Yakin, a student at the Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla on the Xicotepec campus, is studying veterinary and animal husbandry. He began his experimentation by breeding two unique rabbit types together. The Flemish Giant rabbit and other, longer-eared bunnies that Yakin happened to notice. As a result, his monster-bunny was born.

According to Yakin, his experimental bunnies grow up to 22 pounds  Flemish Giant, while the average Flemish giant weighs 15 pounds. But make no mistake, Yakin’s bunny experiment was no accident. “It takes an average of 3 to 4 years to reproduce this giant species,” he told Sintesis.

Yakin’s ultimate goal is to breed a rabbit that can grow up to 30 pounds. “I am currently studying genetics to see how to grow this breed of giant rabbits more,” he said.

Yakin, who has had a soft spot for rabbits since he was a child (pun intended), now cares for a whopping fifty giant rabbits out of his parents’ home.

Luckily, his parents are supportive enough of his dream that they support their son (and his bunnies) financially. “I have the financial support and support of my parents to buy food a week for all 50 giant rabbits,” Yakin told Sintesis.

But he also admitted his project has a long way to go. “So far I have not set aside the time or budget that is required to start the project more seriously,” he said.

The only thing that’s preventing Yakin from committing all his time and energy to creating even bigger bunnies is–what else?–money.

Photo via yakinkiro/Instagram

Although he already submitted a proposal to his university to try and expand his research, as of now, he is self-financed. However, Yakin makes a bit of extra cash by selling the giant bunnies to private customers.

His ultimate goal though, is to open up a large, professional farm where he can breed and cross-breed his bunnies to his heart’s content.

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There’s A Mysterious “Bat Cave” Full Of Blind Snakes Near Cancun And It’s Creepy AF

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There’s A Mysterious “Bat Cave” Full Of Blind Snakes Near Cancun And It’s Creepy AF

Mexico is full of incredible natural beauty, so it’s no wonder that it’s frequently one of the world’s most visited destinations. People love to visit the picturesque beaches, the ancient ruins, lively cities, and relaxed pueblos. But we would imagine that few people would add this mysterious ‘bat cave’ to their list of destinations, considering it’s full of blind snakes that hang from the ceiling to catch their prey. 

Mexico’s mysterious ‘bat cave’ is part of a truly unique ecosystem. 

Cancun is one of Mexico’s most popular tourist attractions. It’s home to some of the world’s greatest beaches and tons of adventure at cenotes and Mayan ruins. But, apparently, it’s also home to a unique ecosystem that includes a so-called bat cave home to thousands of blind snakes that hang upside down. Yikes!

The cave, located less than 180 miles from Cancun’s spectacular beaches, is home to a species of blind, deaf snakes that feed mainly on flying bats.”This is the only place in the world where this happens,” Arturo Enrique Bayona Miramontes, the biologist who discovered it, told Newsweek.

The cave system remained completely unknown to tourists and surprised many scientists, who marveled as the jungle was peeled away to reveal another species, another hidden natural world.

The “cave of the hanging snakes” has a 65-foot wide mouth from which thousands of bats of seven different species swarm out every night, seeking food in and around Lake Chichancanab, some 2 miles away. When the bats return from nighttime feeding, some become food for the snakes.

The cave is a bat paradise – unless they become food for the blind and deaf snakes.

The giant cave is home to hundreds of thousands – perhaps even millions – of bats who cling to the cave’s roof. Joining them in the cave are a unique species of blind and deaf snakes that strike unsuspecting bats as they fly by.

The technique of the yellow-red rat snake is frighteningly precise, Bayona Miramontes said. “These snakes do not see or hear, but they can feel the vibrations of the bats flying, and they use that opportunity to hunt them with their body, suffocating their victims before gobbling them down.”

If you’re feeling adventurous, the cave is open to a limited number of visitors.

The cave is located nearby a very small Mayan community in Kantemó, on the Yucatan peninsula. Although the village is so small that it only has one church, the community has been working hard to protect this unique ecosystem.

Only 10 visitors are allowed inside the cave at a time and no photography is permitted. Since the pandemic began, the cave has been closed but it will reopen when the health department of the Mexican state of Quintana Roo allows tourism again.

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