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15 Carne Asada Recipes That Will Have You Drooling Before The End Of This Post

There are few hard and fast rules on how to make delicious carne asada. Over its long history as carnivorous Latinos’ favorite meaty treat, carne asada has been through many transformations. If you’re making carne asada for the first time there are three key things you must know. 

Sure your papa or tío probably shared their wisdom with you but here is our some of ours.

First, the cut of beef (skirt or flank) must be marinated and seasoned by a pro. Second, the meat must be cooked on a grill or skillet that’s so hot it screams. And third, the meat must be properly rested and thinly sliced before serving.

With the ground rules out the way, here are 15 carne asada recipes guaranteed to get you drooling before you know it.

1) The Simple Carne Asada

Credit: Mexican Food Journal

There are many ways to make a carne asada marinade but many swear by simplicity. At it’s most basic, a simple carne asada marinade is made from oil, salt, pepper, garlic, and lime juice. Nothing more. Let the meat chill in the marinade for at least 4 hours and return to room temperature before you slap it on the grill.

2) The Classic Carne Asada 

Credit: Isabeleats.com

There’s simple and then there’s classic. This carne asada recipe from Isabel Eats follows the recipe the author remembers from her childhood. To the oil, lime, garlic, and seasoning in the simple marinade above, Isabel adds a good handful of chopped cilantro, a chopped jalapeno, white wine vinegar, chilli powder, dried oregano, and cumin.

3) Carne Asada with a Citrus Punch

Credit: RainbowJewels at All Recipes

This crowd-sourced recipe for carne asada takes the basic carne asada marinade above and adds a whole host of other flavors, including a major glug of citrus juice. Lime juice, lemon juice, and orange juice go into this marinade, along with chopped chipotle pepper, coriander seeds and cumin. This recipe recommends flank steak or skirt steak and suggests you regularly massage the meat while it’s marinating!

4) Port Wine and Ginger Carne Asada

Credit: All Recipes

Ever thought about adding a ¼ cup of honey, some grated ginger and a cup of port wine to your carne asada marinade? Well now’s the time to give it a try! This recipe for flank steak with a port wine marinade is essentially port wine carne asada. Searing the meat on a smoking hot outside grill cooks the wine off nicely, leaving a sticky, sweet coating behind.

5) Spicy Carne Asada with Fish Sauce

Credit: A Spicy Perspective

According to the author, this Mexico-inspired carne asada from A Spicy Perspective is a fast, healthy low-carb meal. This recipe is also packed with flavor and easy to prepare. For this marinade, you need to add ancho chilli powder and habanero chiles to the usual ingredients like garlic, cilantro, and lime. These two types of chilli give the recipe a kick. But it’s the addition of fish sauce that adds a vivid umami flavor to the meat that will have your guests coming back to the grill for second and third helpings.

6) Carne Asada Tacos

Credit: Food Network

And now, a true Mexican rule to live by. If in doubt, put it in a taco. The Food Network recommends marinating your steak in a simple Mojo (marinade) that includes two tablespoons of white vinegar and a whole jalapeno for 8 hours. Any more and the meat begins to break down and loses its texture. Once cooked, pile the meat on top of warmed tortillas, sprinkle with lettuce, onion, and cheese and finish with Pico de Gallo salsa.

7) Roy Choi’s Carne Asada

Credit: NY Times

Now we’re going to get a little fancy with this take on carne asada from LA chef and Kogi BBQ founder Roy Choi. A number of ingredients set this recipe apart. Take the classic carne asada recipe, lose the cumin and oregano and add mirin, beer, chopped tomato, and onion. Roy recommends a coal-fired grill to get a good crisp on the outer edges of the meat.

8) Carne Asada with Soy Sauce

Credit: Damn Delicious

This popular recipe from Chungah at Damn Delicious keeps things simple but adds one key ingredient – soy sauce. Seasoning is a very important and every good carne asada cook has a salt grinder on hand. But soy sauce adds a richer flavor that cannot be achieved through salt alone. Chungah quite rightly uses flank steak and cooks the meat for only six minutes to keep the dish nice and rare.

9) Vegan Jackfruit Carne Asada

Credit: The Nut Free Vegan

For our vegan friends, this carne asada recipe replaces beef steak with jackfruit. Jackfruit is a tropical fruit native to South India that has a fibrous, meaty texture when cooked. Shredded jackfruit often pops up on vegan menus as an alternative to pulled pork but when doused in a spicy citrus marinade it can pass for a tasty vegan carne asada! This recipe recommends baking the jackfruit, rather than grilling it but throwing the marinated fruit on the grill should work just as well. 

10) Carne Asada Salad

Credit: Skinny Taste

Carne asada goes beautifully with fresh salad vegetables. This salad recipe from Skinny Taste shows you how to incorporate juicy strip steak into a fresh summer salad. The carne asada is treated to a simple marinade and grilled in the usual way. Once rested and sliced, the meat is thrown onto a bed of salad leaves, covered with homemade Pico de Gallo and doused with the juice of an entire lime.

11) Carne Asada Fries

Credit: Downshiftology

Everything in moderation. If you’re eating the salad, you can also eat the fries! To make carne asada fries, prepare a half portion of carne asada using the classic carne asada recipe above (number 2). Make a batch of fries; either from scratch using russet potatoes and a deep fryer or by short cut using oven fries. Sprinkle grated cheese and a teaspoon of paprika over the fries, pile on the carne asada and finish with a dollop of guacamole. Heaven.

12) Carne Asada Burrito Casserole

Credit: Claire Lower at Lifehacker

Trust Lifehacker to come up with a recipe you didn’t know you wanted. Essentially a layered casserole with carne asada and all the ingredients you’d need for a burrito cooked together in the oven, this carne asada burrito casserole is not elegant but it sure is tasty. 

13) Carne Asada con Rajas

Credit: James Ransom at Food52

Food52 enjoys its carne asada con rajas, which means carne asada with sliced peppers. The most refined recipe on this list, carne asada con rajas requires a fairly complex marinade that includes brown sugar, cumin, and ancho chilli powder. Once the steak has been marinated, cooked and rested, you can start on the rajas. Saute poblano pepper and onions in olive oil, add minced garlic then finish with fresh oregano and a dollop of heavy cream. 

14) Keto Carne Asada and Chimichurri

Credit; I Breathe I’m Hungry

If you’re following a keto, low carb, paleo or dairy-free diet, this recipe is the one for you. This keto carne asada marinadefeatures healthy ingredients like avocado oil, cider vinegar, and cayenne pepper and the side of Chimichurri sauce is much lighter than the usual sides of rice and tortillas. Net carbs per serving: 0g!

15) The Ultimate Carne Asada 

Credit:  J. Kenji López-Alt at Serious Eats

And to finish, the ultimate carne asada recipe from Serious Eats. This recipe combines everything we’ve learned from the recipes above and incorporates it into the ultimate carne asada experience. Three types of fresh chilli (ancho, guajillo, chipotle), a whole load of citrus, soy sauce and fish sauce go into this marinade. The result is a slab of grilled meat that’s buttery, salty, sweet and absolutely delicious.

It Could Be Time To Say Goodbye To Your Salsa Forever As Tomatoes And Chilies Are In Danger Of Going Extinct

Culture

It Could Be Time To Say Goodbye To Your Salsa Forever As Tomatoes And Chilies Are In Danger Of Going Extinct

Pixabay

Two of Latin America’s most important ingredients – staples of cuisines across the region – are in danger of possible extinction thanks to climate change. Tomatoes and chilies both make up a huge part of traditional recipes from Mexico to Brazil and Argentina to Cuba – and they’re close to disappearing from grocery stores everywhere.

We know that tomato and chili are two fundamental ingredients in Mexican cuisine. Due to the threats suffered by its main pollinator, the bumblebee, these basic ingredients could disappear forever.

Climate change is wreaking havoc on the planet. But one of the most at-risk species is the humble bumble bee. These often feared insects are a vital source of pollination for thousands of plant and flower species around the world – if they disappear so too do the species of plants that depend on them.

Pollinators are species of great importance for a healthy environment. They are responsible for the the diversity and health of various biomes. Across Latin America, the bumble bee is largely responsible for the pollination of modern agriculture and this could have a major impact on the production of tomatoes and chilis.

Unfortunately, bumblebees are currently threatened, resulting in the possible extinction of different vegetables, including tomatoes and chili.

But why does the tiny bumble bee matter at all?

The bumble bee belongs to the insect family Apidae, which includes hundeds of different species of bumblebees. In fact, the bumble bee can be found on every continent except Antarctica and plays an outsized role in agriculture. The insects are often larger than honey bees, come in black and white varieties and often feature white, yellow, or orange stripes. This genus belongs to the Apidae family that includes different species commonly known as bumblebees. They’re almost entirely covered by very silky hairs. An adult bumblebee reaches 20 millimeters or more and feeds primarily on nectar from flowering plants. A curious fact is that females have the ability to sting, while males do not.

Bumblebees are epic pollinators of the tomato and chili plantS. Together with different species, the bumblebee helps produce many staple foods that are part of healthy diets around the world. If these become extinct the eating habits of all Latinos would suffer drastic changes as several vegetables would disappear.

So why are bumblebees in danger?

The main threat of these insects is the pesticides used in modern agriculture. That is why it is necessary to avoid consuming food produced in this way. We can all help the bumblebee planting plants, protecting native species and especially not damaging their natural environment.

But climate change is also wreaking havoc on the breeding patters of bumblebees – leading to colony collapse. With fewer colonies there is less breeding and therefore fewer bees around the world to pollinate our global crops.

Can you imagine a world without tomatoes or chilies?

Salsa. Moles. Pico de gallo. Ketchup. Chiles rellenos. Picadillo. All of these iconic Latin American dishes would be in danger of going extinct along with the bumblebee – because what’s a mole without the rich, complex flavors of dried chilies?

Several groups are already working hard to help fund programs that would work to conserve the dwindling bumblebee populations. While others are working out solutions that could perhaps allow tomatoes and chilies to self-pollinate – much as other plants already do.

We Found The Best Latino Eats At Trader Joe’s So You Wouldn’t Have To

Culture

We Found The Best Latino Eats At Trader Joe’s So You Wouldn’t Have To

Trader Joe's

Trader Joe’s may not be the first name that comes to mind when you’re thinking of authentic Latin food. But surprisingly enough, this cult-favorite specialty store has a variety of foods from across Latinidad that (while they may not be as good as abuela’s) hit the spot when you’re in a pinch. 

From Frozen quesadillas to packaged plantain chips, Trader Joe’s has a ton of foods from Latin America to satisfy your wallet and your tastebuds. And who knows? Maybe even your abuela will approve. Take a look at 10 of the best Trader Joe’s Latin food options below! 

1. Southwest Chicken Quesadillas

via Trader Joe’s website

According to Reddit user u/gratefulem220, these treats fly woefully under the radar. “Southwest quesadillas are so good. They’re like southwest egg rolls from any chain restaurant but in quesadilla form”

2. Chili Spiced Dried Mango

via Trader Joe’s website

You may have grown out of your Vero Mango days, but Trader Joe’s offers a sweet and healthy alternative to the famous Mexican candy. According to Trader Joe’s, this dried fruit is lovingly coated in a “blend of paprika, cayenne, sugar, & salt”. What’s not to love?

3. Chicken Enchiladas Verde

via Trader Joe’s website

According to Trader Joe’s, their Chicken Enchiladas are filled with “chicken breast, Monterey jack cheese, and a special enchiladas verdes sauce made from crushed tomatillo, onion, green chili peppers, and diced poblanos.”  We know it’s hard to beat homemade, but Trader Joes usually comes through with yummy late night snacks.

4. Mini Chicken Tacos

via Trader Joe’s website

Sure, these aren’t your madre’s tacos, but these Mini Chicken Tacos haven’t become a fan-favorite for nothing. According to Trader Joe’s, these tacos are made with crispy yellow corn tortillas, and then “are filled with chunks of chicken leg and breast meat that’s been simmered in a tangy, green chile tomatillo sauce kicked up with a bit of jalapeño pepper”. Sounds delicious.

5. Cuban-Style Citrus Garlic Bowl

via Trader Joe’s website

Finally, a snack fit for the Cubanos out there. While Trader Joe’s may be famous for it’s iterations of Mexican food (it was founded in Southern California, after all), once in a while, they throw the rest of Latinidad a bone. This time, they tried their hand at a Cuban Style Citrus Garlic Bowl. According to TJ’s, the bowl is made of marinated chicken thighs, yellow rice, diced bell peppers and onions, black beans, plantains, and cilantro. And to make matters even better, it’s topped of with mojo criollo sauce.

6. Black Bean & Cheese Taquitos

via Trader Joe’s website

Taquitos are arguably the perfect snack food. If it’s gameday finger food or mouth-watering appetizers, taquitos always hit the spot. These ones are made with “seasoned black beans & Monterey Jack cheese”. You can’t go wrong with this tasty vegetarian snack option. 

7. Chicken Chilaquiles Rojo

via Trader Joe’s website

Chilaquiles are a breakfast staple in Mexico, and TJ’s has offered up it’s own version on this savory treat. If you really want to take this frozen food to the next level, don’t be afraid to experiment in the kitchen a bit. “We made this this weekend, topped with sour cream, avocado, a sunny side up egg and a dash of hot sauce,” said Reddit user u/Pepperpeople444.

8. Roasted Plantain Chips

via Trader Joe’s website

In many parts of Latinidad, plantains are as common to Latinos as apples are to North Americans. Those who miss their sweet banana snacks are in for a treat when they visit Trader Joe’s. “They’re just crispy, crunchy, starchy goodness!” says Reddit user u/Hazy_Cat. “There’s just a teeny-tiny hint of sweetness that makes them ultra addictive. The TJ ones are my favorite”.

9. Giant Peruvian Inca Corn

via Trader Joe’s website

If you’re in the mood for something salty and crunchy but know that potato chips won’t hit the spot, opt instead for a bag of Giant Peruvian Inca Corn. “For years of my life, my favorite go to snack was TJ’s giant Peruvian Inca Corn. It’s crunchy salty goodness got me through many nights of school and games. Satisfied me through many hungry afternoons,” says Reddit user u/Doombuggie41. “Corn nuts don’t do the same thing”.

10. Trader Joe’s Peruvian Style Chimichurri Rice

via Trader Joe’s website

According to Reddit user u/crazypterodactyl, there’s a million ways to use this delicious frozen rice: “We make ours into soup (they had it as a sample one time). One bag chimichurri rice, one can black beans, one carton black bean soup. I add garlic and lime juice, but that’s not necessary. Serve plain, or with cheese, sour cream, and/or cilantro. So good and so easy!”