comedy

Watch Romeo Santos, Daddy Yankee And Nicky Jam Be The Ultimate Corny Creeps In ‘Bella y Sensual’

Credit: RomeoSantosVEVO/ YouTube

Romeo Santos, Daddy Yankee and Nicky Jam just dropped a music video for their new song “Bella y Sensual” that pulls a page out of the “How to be a New York papi-chulo” handbook.

The trio shows us a typical night out for guys in The Big Apple, and it’s got all the trappings of the reggatonero life, giving us a how-to guide on being the corniest, rico suave dude on the planet.

First, stand around a rooftop pool with your boys, a chilly fall breeze filling the air, as women, for some reason, walk by in bikinis, looking cold as hell. Like, how come none of these dude offer her a jacket?

Next, make sure to dress up in the most ridiculous outfit you can find. If you’re like Romeo, this includes a leopard print shirt, gaudy gold sneakers and, of course, a fedora.

Leave the frozen pool area to go uptown to hang out in front of a subway station at 9:30 p.m for what appears to be an unlicensed street party. As you pull in your cars “The Fast and The Furious” style, high beams illuminating the street party, make sure to catcall any woman walking by. Remember to change your outfit from a fedora to a varsity jacket with a cape, because you’re obviously out here trying to save the ladies from enjoying a night out with their friends in peace.

After trying to convince a girl to give you the time of day, decide to leave her alone only when the police show up to break up your illegal street rager.

Finally, at 1 a.m., get to the club. Don’t forget to flirt with the bottle girls. They love that, and really want to hear all the illuminating things you have to scream in their ears over the music.

Then at 5 a.m., make your way to the neighborhood diner for some grub. Make sure to eat something hearty to sober up after all that free bottle service your flirting got you. Even after hours and hours of dancing and sweating, everyone at the diner is still looking impeccable, so remember to stay sharp, playa. Flirt with everyone trying to enjoy their late dinner/early breakfast. Who doesn’t want to be chatted up over eggs and the early signs of a hangover?

Just before calling it a night, make sure to holler at the same girl your friends tried to get at. Taking no for an answer, even though it’s the right thing to do, isn’t for you. You’re a macho stereotype. Get out of here with that logical stuff. Also, women love your arrogant pick up lines. Don’t worry about her friends who want to leave, they won’t think you’re being inconsiderate at all.

And after all of that, be sure to creepily offer her a ride. Attempt to convince her by calling her “baby” and “mamacita.”

Be sure to watch her drive away, and shout things at her when she’s still within earshot. Getting away from you as quickly as humanly possible is a clear sign that she’s into at least one of you.

Then, high five your homies for a successful night out on the town. And finally, make sure to be extra quiet as you creep back into your parents’ crib. Being a grown, catcalling, creep of a man is hard when you’re living with the ‘rents, but don’t worry, you got this. ?


READ: It’s Time For Men To Step Up And Call Out Their Homies About Sexual Harassment And Assault


Recommend this story to a friend by clicking on the share button below.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Reggaetón Won Big At This Year’s Billboard Latin Music Awards And These Two Artists Took Center Stage

Entertainment

Reggaetón Won Big At This Year’s Billboard Latin Music Awards And These Two Artists Took Center Stage

Alexander Tamargo / Getty Images

The 2020 Billboard Latin Music Awards have finally come and gone after being postponed because of the Coronavirus pandemic earlier this year. So many of us were anticipating the night asa chance to escape from all the worldwide drama – even if only for one night. And the awards show definitely delivered.

Going into the night, Bad Bunny and Ozuna were expected to win big with 14 nominations each including Artist of the Year. But it was Bad Bunny and Daddy Yankee who went home with seven awards each. And when the awards weren’t being handed out, Pitbull, Paulina Rubio and Ozuna, along with many others artists, delivered stunning performances.

Much of the show’s success is owed to Venezuelan actress Gaby Espino who served as the show’s host with help from Nicaraguan co-host Nastassja Bolivar.

Reggaetón artists stole the show at this year’s Billboard Latin Music Awards and we couldn’t be more proud.

Although reggaetón artists were expected to win big this year, many were still surprised at just how well some of the biggest artists ended up doing. Both Bad Bunny and Daddy Yankee triumphed with seven trophies each at last night’s Billboard Latin Music Awards.

Of course, the night was about celebrating all the incredible music these artists have brought us this year – perhaps a git more important than ever as we all struggle amid a pandemic and other global issues. But so many artists shined a light on front-line workers, victims of Covid-19 and violence against women – it was a very powerful evening.

One of the first groups to speak out was Wisin y Yandel. The duo sent a powerful message through their acceptance speech, with Yandel ending it with a resounding “no more abuse against women.” Wisin urged Latinos to get out and vote on Nov. 3 with his second message. “Go out and vote because we’re voting for our future. And vote for that person that will actually care about our community.”

And to top it all off, Maluma accepted the Billboard Spirit of Hope Award, in honor of his foundation, El Arte de los Sueños, which protects youth in pursuit of their dreams.

Bad Bunny is our reigning Artist of the Year.

After last night’s award ceremony, we have a new reigning Top Artist of the Year in Bad Bunny. Although the reggaetónero didn’t attend the award ceremony, he was definitely a highlight of the night.

San Benito took home seven awards (from his 14 nominations) including the top honor, as well as top Latin Album for “X 100PRE” and Songwriter of the Year.

Daddy Yankee, Karol G and several other top artists won big as well.

Daddy Yankee won six of his awards for his hit “Con Calma,” which featured the 1990s artist Snow. His honors included the hot Latin song “Aware.” During his acceptance speech, he acknowledged these have been tough times and dedicated his award to those who have lost their loved ones due to COVID-19.

“These have been challenging times and I want to share this award with those who have been perseverant and those who have lost a loved one. Music continues to be the best medicine,” he said.

Karol G also won big with prizes for Top Latin Albums Artist of the Year, Female, and Hot Latin Songs Artist of the Year, Female.

Ozuna gave us two incredible live performances.

About an hour into the show, Ozuna and the Black Eyed Peas heated up the stage with their smash hit “Mamacita.” Practicing social distancing, Ozuna sang from one stage while Taboo, apl.de.ap and J. Rey Soul danced away to the catchy tune and will.i.am was in another stage delivering the catchy hook “Mamacita, Mamacita, que bonita.”

In his second performance of the night, Ozuna returned to the stage for an intimate performance of “Gracias.” Surrounded by candles and dressed in angelic white, a thankful Ozuna slowed things down for this stripped-down acoustic track. Making the performance even more special and personal, the superstar’s kids joined him onstage. By far one of the most beautiful performances of the night. “Let’s take care of our families,” Ozuna said. “Let’s take care of women. There are too many femicides around the world and they are the ones who gave us life.”

Another standout moment was the special tribute in honor of Mexican singer-songwriter Armando Manzanero.

Artists Pablo Alborán, Luis Fonsi, Jesús Navarro (Reik) and Joy (Jesse & Joy) sang a medley of Manzanero classics including “Contigo Aprendí” and “No Sé Tu.”

“I have no words to express what my heart is feeling right now after singing with this new generation of artists that is so grand, strong and talented in a special stage like this one,” Manzanero said following his performance.

Meanwhile, the ear worm “Despacito” was named Song of the Decade.

It seems we can’t escape this 2017 hit featuring Luis Fonsi and Daddy Yankee. We won’t mention the other version that also had an appearance by Justin Bieber – although I guess I just did.

But it was inducted into Billboard Latin Music history as it took home the evenings Song of the Decade award – marking another win for Daddy Yankee.

Did you watch the awards show? What did you think?

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Bad Bunny Talks New Music And His Future In Reggaetón In A Powerful New Interview

Entertainment

Bad Bunny Talks New Music And His Future In Reggaetón In A Powerful New Interview

Kevin Mazur / Getty Images

So much of this year has been spent inside our apartments singing and dancing to Bad Bunny hits like “Safaera” and “Yo Perreo Sola” or looking through countless magazines that made him their cover boy.

It seems that 2020 is peak Bad Bunny, as the reggaetónero takes over the world bringing us hit after hit while bringing perreo into the mainstream.

Now, in his latest cover story in The Culture Issue of the New York Times, San Benito gives us insight into what his 2020 has been like, what we can expect from him in the not so distant future and what being a Puerto Rican super star means to him.

Bad Bunny is taking over the world and his latest interview with the New York Times details just how he plans to do it.

‘The World According to Bad Bunny’ – that is what graces the cover of the New York Times’ latest Culture Issue. And it catches your eye – his full face, including his now signature mustache – force you to do a double take to soak in all of his glory. Or maybe that was just my reaction…

Benito Antonio Martínez Ocasio — more popularly known as Bad Bunny, San Benito, El Conejo Malo — is the reggaetónero we’ve all fallen in love with and who is topping charts throughout the world. 

His latest feature story covers everything from his love for Puerto Rico to his next album, but it’s also another major step for the artist in putting both is home and the Latino community on the world stage.

His profile begins with Bad Bunny discussing his album YHLQMDLG, which begins with the song “Si Veo a Tu Mamá”, which has a verse we can all relate to in 2020: “maldito Año Nuevo” (or “this damn new year”). But despite all the BS that 2020 has thrown our way, Bad Bunny has managed to shine through by being an advocate when it comes to so many issues.

Bad Bunny says he feels like an “athlete representing his Puerto Rico at the Olympics.“

San Benito has made it his mission to put his homeland on the map and to showcase to the world the problems that Boricuas face on the island. In the interview, Bad Bunny describes himself as an athlete representing Puerto Rico in the Olympics.

Those problems he speaks of include the island’s status as a commonwealth territory of the U.S. which means its citizens on the island cannot vote for president or have any voting representatives in Congress. 

The natural disasters of Hurricane Maria, Irma and the earthquakes that rung in 2020 also add to the laundry list of problems, and also came with little financial help from Trump’s federal government, which has left Puerto Rico in a vulnerable state to this day.

In language, Caribbean Spanish like that of Puerto Rico is heavily criticized by the so-called sophisticated Latin Americans, but they all bop their heads to Bad Bunny tunes like “Safaera,” “La Romana,” and more.

So many of us love Bad Bunny for his constant activism and he doesn’t disappoint in this NYT piece.

Bad Bunny is known for breaking cultural stereotypes, shattering boundaries others couldn’t dream of, and advocating for women. He’s even openly talked about depression, and shown the world it is okay not to feel okay.

His activism has also shown support for the trans community with the video “Yo Perreo Sola,” dressed in drag, or when he’s done public appearances wearing a skirt and a shirt that read “mataron a alexa, no a un hombre en falda.”

However, in the wake of George Floyd’s murder, Benito was suspiciously mute — no posts on social media, no interviews. He seemed to have disappeared at a moment that so many of us could of benefited from his compassion. Many criticized the singer for his silence.

But on June 12, a TIME article was published about him speaking out, through email exchanges, and how he did not want to just send a basic message, but rather go deeper to “support the fight against a systematic monster that’s been [around for] centuries.”

Bad Bunny also speaks out about reggaetón’s black roots – which so often go unmentioned.

Credit: Kevin Mazur / Getty Images

As for inspirations, Benito called out the prominent Black stars who helped shape reggaetón into the phenomenon that is it today. He admits that’s something he’s still learning about. “As a child, for better or worse, I always lived in my bubble,” Benito says. “Now, I could say – and people do say – it’s a form of privilege. But it’s always been my way of being. Me, in my house and in my bubble, imagining a better, more magical world.”

As he ascends into the pop mainstream, Bad Bunny also opens up about returning reggaetón to its Puerto Rican roots on his album YHLQMDLG. “Since reggaetón went pop all over the world, I don’t feel like people really know the sound that raised me, that I grew up studying,” he says. “This is the album I would’ve wanted to release when I was 15 and dreamed of being a singer.” Benito also hints to the next project, adding, “My next album doesn’t have anything to do with YHLQMDLG.”

It’s a long interview but, come on, it’s with Bad Bunny so the entire interview is worth the read. You can check out the NYT piece here.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com