comedy

Here’s What Happened When I Tried Wearing Acrylic Nails For Three Days

Jorge Rodriguez-Jimenez

I, Jorge Rodriguez-Jimenez, wore acrylic nails for three day as part of a mitú social experiment video. It was me and two dudes learning how to live, work, and function with these nails and the results were interesting. Before you ask, using the bathroom was not the kind of challenge I expected. But more about that later…

The very first thing I tried was typing (since it’s a huge part of my job) and it sucked.

Jorge Rodriguez-Jimenez
CREDIT: Jorge Rodriguez-Jimenez

My own productivity plummeted as a result of the nails and I was happy to write three words in a row without having to retype them. To this day I still don’t get how people can type with those nails.

Even the old pen and paper was a challenge I couldn’t fully master.

Jorge Rodriguez-Jimenez
CREDIT: Jorge Rodriguez-Jimenez

No matter how I positioned my hands I was being stabbed by those talons I was living with.

However, the animals that call my apartment home were thrilled when I got home.

Jorge Rodriguez-Jimenez
CREDIT: Jorge Rodriguez-Jimenez

And I do mean thrilllled.

Jorge Rodriguez-Jimenez
CREDIT: Jorge Rodriguez-Jimenez

At least someone was benefiting from my nails choice. ??

I painfully caught these little daggers on everything from door handles to pant pockets.

Jorge Rodriguez-Jimenez
CREDIT: Jorge Rodriguez-Jimenez

There was a time or two when I thought I had ripped my nail off leaving me in tears with no relief in sight.

And they were not as helpful or strong as I had always thought they were.

Jorge Rodriguez-Jimenez
CREDIT: Jorge Rodriguez-Jimenez

Such. ?? A. ?? Bad. ?? Idea! ??

Tying shoes quickly became a time consuming and soul-crushing affair.

Jorge Rodriguez-Jimenez
CREDIT: Jorge Rodriguez-Jimenez

And taking them off made me really think about my life choices.

At some point, I was sure that these nails were out to get me, like when they tried to ruin my lunch.

Jorge Rodriguez-Jimenez
CREDIT: Jorge Rodriguez-Jimenez

How does one even do this?!

But, an insider tip, these acrylic nuisances make for wonderful ear scratchers.

Jorge Rodriguez-Jimenez
CREDIT: Jorge Rodriguez-Jimenez

That moment made three days of torture and immobility totally worth it.

Watch my entire experience here:

Guys try fake nails for 3 days.

Posted by We are mitú on Monday, February 20, 2017


READ: NBC Is Developing A Sitcom Featuring These Chicano Comedy Vets


Latinas Have Always Pushed The Envelope When It Comes To The Acrylic Nails Game

Culture

Latinas Have Always Pushed The Envelope When It Comes To The Acrylic Nails Game

NailzImage by Michelle Yip / Flickr / ljaebeauty / Instagram

Acrylic nails have been a long-time fashion staple. Many of us have those early memories of a tía, a vecina, mom, etc., rocking the long red nails. Today, fake nails are not just a passing fad, but they have become an essential part of pop-culture, wearable art. Most famously, Cardi B (who has worn acrylics since before she was famous and has remained loyal to her same nail artist Jenny Bui) is one of the celebrities that has captivated the world which her famous “sets” which, no doubt, has inspired millions of fans.

Acrylic nails have always and will continue to be a woman’s strongest style accessory.

Credit: iamcardb / Instagram

One of the most iconic sets is part of a special exhibit at the Museum of Modern Art. Back in the 90s, Lil Kim (the original Queen Bee) asked her manicurist – celebrity nail artist Bernadette Thompson – to add something different to the nail design for a photoshoot for the Junior M.A.F.I.A. single “Get Money.” Thinking on her feet, Thompson cut up a dollar bill and…the rest is history. Thompson is credited with moving nail art into the world of high fashion since she often had to fight against editors of Vogue, and other big-name fashion magazines, to feature the nail designs worn by the artist.

They can tell any story you want and make any statement you can imagine.

Credit: Pinterest

However, acrylics have been here long before celebrities and Instagram. One of the most famous manicures has even held Olympic gold, thanks to Hall of Famer, Florence Griffith Joyner. “Flo Jo” – still considered the fastest women in history – not only was she an iconic Olympian, but she was also known for her distinctive fierce style and nails.

Credit: Pinterest

If we look at the history of nail art, India is the first to put color on the map in 5000 B.C. and are credited with being the ones to dip fingertips in red henna, a practice which is still seen today.

Different cultures across the world have incorporated acrylic nails.

Credit: Pinterest

But where did the concept of acrylic nails come from? The earliest traces can be found somewhere around 3000 B.C between Egypt and China. We can thank ancient Egyptians for almost every aspect of the beauty and cosmetics that we use today. They also introduced the notion of associating red with power and nobility. Noblemen and women would use berries to add red hues to their nails and if anyone from the lower class was caught with red nails, they were put to death. It is believed that the ancient royal Egyptians used ivory, gold, and bone to create extensions of their nails. Shorter nails implied that you needed your hands available to work, therefore, longer nails became a symbol of status, wealth and non-laboring hands.

Around the same time period, the ancient Chinese were the first to make a “permanent color stain” that would taint nails the same as nail polish does today. Here is also where we have the closest example to modern-day acrylics. The earliest dynasties created elaborate “fingernail guards” which gave the appearance of exaggerated long nails. The nail extensions were made of gold and precious gems; and as with the ancient Egyptians, long nails became a symbol of a someone that did not need their hands free for manual labor and therefore became a symbol of the ruling class. The ornate nails were usually worn on one hand, covering each finger (except the thumb) and only the most elite wore fingernail guards on both hands.

Credit: Pinterest

In both Egypt and China, higher-ranking men and kings also sported the acrylics and nail polish. When King Tut’s tomb was discovered in 1922, among his treasures they found the royal red nail coloring still in a sealed bottle, and the paint was still good.

Ancient Greece also got in on early acrylic nails. They believed in the healing energy of the moon and favored the appearance of moon shape nails. Greek women would place pistachio nut shells over their nails and in order to give a pleasing round appearance.

In South America, the Incas of Peru, are said to have been the first to have actually created nail art, by adding a decorative element – an eagle – to their nails.

Credit: Pinterest

Over time, artificial nails were slowly making their way throughout Europe and eventually made their way across the ocean.

In 1934, Dr. Maxwell Lappe – a dentist from Chicago – was working on a remedy to help his patients who bit their nails. Mixing two dental acrylic products – liquid and powder – he created Nu Nails. The mixture was thick and heavy, meant to create a hard nail protective covering.

However, these are the first official artificial nails documented in modern history.

Credit Pour L’ Image / Facebook

During the 1930s, starlets –  like Greta Garbo –  often tried to create their own “nail extensions” by wrapping foil around their fingers and then painting the foil red.

In 1957, twenty years after Nu Nails, another dentist – Dr. Frederick Slack – made a breakthrough. As the story goes, he broke his own nail and in order to create a temporary fix, he used dental acrylic and aluminum foil, and accidentally invented the first sculpted acrylic nail. The Slack family went on launch the modern acrylic nail industry and has since created several innovative products, including the first non-yellowing bonding formula, which is still used today.

The nail game is constantly growing and evolving.  Today, we are in an acrylic boom again, nails are not only a part of our fashion, but they can also be part of the larger conversation.

Your set can reflect your politics, religion, heritage etc.

Credit: Pinterest

Acrylic nails and nail art aren’t going anywhere, they have been here since the days of B.C. and will most likely continue to always be part of our human story. Although women of color in the United States are often chastised for wearing long and elaborate nails, it has never stopped us from doing so, nor should it. We are walking in the traditions of ancient royals and nobility – men and women – so continue to hold your head high, pick your colors, add some bling and don’t be shy; tú dale, and make the ancient world proud…live boldly.

READ: Cardi B’s Blinged Out Nails Have Inspired Reebok New Dazzling Limited-Edition Shoe

Some On Instagram Say Super-Long Toenails Are The Go-To Look of the Summer, We Respectfully Disagree

Entertainment

Some On Instagram Say Super-Long Toenails Are The Go-To Look of the Summer, We Respectfully Disagree

We’re currently in the thick of summertime and you know what that means: sun’s out, toes out. And this year, the toenails are looking quite a bit different than usual. That’s right, the newest trend lighting up Instagram is one we never thought we’d see: extra-long toenail pedicures.

Fortunately for us, the toenails that are catching the most attention are super-manicured and appear to be acrylics. That means the length isn’t due to neglecting a toenail clipper (thank god), but due to paying someone to make the toenails longer with a little glue and some press-ons. So next time you take a trip to the nail salon, think about asking for the newest beauty trend: long toenail acrylics. You’re sure to be the coolest girl on the block.

We’ve compiled some of the most popular looks to offer you some inspiration.

We’ll start off gently

@7eetout/Instagram

Yes, these toenails are long, but they’re relatively mild compared to what you’re about to see. This is the standard look for the long-toenail trend. The color is solid, the shape is square, and the length isn’t so long that you can automatically spot them as acrylics.

These ones are a little more intense

@paints_his_toes/Instagram

It’s not the big toe that’s the most surprising of this look, but rather, the length of the small toes. It appears that this woman invested in acrylics for her small toes because, as we know, growing out your smaller toenails usually just ends in a lot of painful in-growns.

These big toes look suspiciously like duck bills

@7eetout/Instagram

We can’t say we’re a fan of these ones. While the previous looks (mostly) kept their biggest toes on the more natural side, these ones are so freakishly long that they’re obviously not home-grown. No one’s big toenail can get that long without curling over!

This is about as mainstream as the “long toenail trend” gets:

@tenlittlebeauties/Instagram

Here we have a perfectly lovely pair of feet (never thought I would write that sentence) with medium-long lengths for all her toenails. Yes, the length is a little longer than mainstream, but you wouldn’t be shocked to see these on the street. It’s also worth mentioning that this is one of the few pairs of feet not rocking toe rings, so it seems this person favors a more conservative look.

The long French pedicure

@7eetout/Instagram

The people who say French manicures are making a comeback probably didn’t have this in mind. The number one rule of a classy French manicure is that the white tips aren’t longer than the pink base. It’s a no from us, dawg.

The “Real Housewife” Look:

@7eetout/Instagram

Although this acrylic pedicure is pretty shocking up close, we could actually totally see it on a wealthy, married woman of a certain age.

Long and round pedicure

@inspire73/Instagram

Here’s a look that deviates from most of the other looks. While the other women seemed to opt for a squared-off look, this woman decided on rounded toenails. This is definitely one of the more unique pedicures we’ve ever seen. But of course, there’s more…

The bird talons

@brittanybubbleass/Instagram

The sheer length, width, and curve of these toenails are downright shocking. But what’s more shocking is about the number of fans this look has. The comments on this look’s post are very complimentary, to put it lightly.

The white claws:

@7eetout/Instagram

Although we love the look of a white pedicure, they’re not known for longevity. Unlike nudes, pinks, or other more neutral colors, a white pedicure can become ruined really quickly because the chips are so noticeable. We’re sure that long toenails expedite the chip-factor.

This pedicure looks like it would scrape the ground while walking

@7eetout/Instagram

You know your toenails are too long when they hang off the side of your open-toed sandals. It’s pictures like these that make us remember why short toenails are the go-to standard. They’re more livable and more convenient! This pedicure looks like it would be chipped by the sidewalk just from a brief walk.

The long red look seems to be the go-to style for pedicure acrylics

@kamichrom/Instagram

The reasoning behind that would make sense. Anyone who’s spending the time and money to make their toenails that long would definitely want them to stand out. And red polish is just another way to bring people’s eye-line down to your feet!

And finally, the long-nailed pedicure look that takes the cake:

@nail_sunny

If you were shocked by any of the previous ones, then this one is sure to send you over the edge. We’re not quite sure why anyone would be interested in getting toenail acrylics like this. But one simple Instagram search proves that there’s a market for this look.