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This Latino Actor’s Star Continues To Rise Thanks To Roles Like This

Demian Bichir has taken on characters from all walks of life, but his latest was a role he couldn’t “say no to.”



In Ridley Scott’s ‘Alien: Covenant,’ Demian Bichir plays Sgt. Lope, a character in a same-sex relationship who’s on a colonizing mission in outer space. In an interview he did with Variety, he said that the most challenging part about adjusting to so many different kinds of roles was stepping out of his comfort zone. He went on to say, “that’s the only way you can surprise yourself.” While he admits, “You have to say no many times to find the right roles.” He joined the cast of ‘Alien: Covenant’ because, “You can’t say no to Ridley Scott.”

Born in Mexico and trained in theatre, Bichir is an actor whose prowess has been on display in TV shows like ‘Weeds,’ and on the big screen starring in films as varied as Quentin Tarantino’s western piece ’The Hateful Eight,’ and Steven Soderbergh’s “Che” Guevara biopic, ‘Che.’ He was even nominated for an Oscar for his role in “A Better Life.

Check out Demian Bichir in Alien: Covenant when it hits theaters everywhere on May 19th:

20th Century Fox / YouTube

We’re pumped! ? ?


READ: The Trailer For “Lowriders,” Starring Eva Longoria And Demian Bichir, Just Dropped

[H/T] Variety: Demian Bichir on ‘Alien: Covenant’: ‘You Can’t Say No to Ridley Scott’

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Lady Gaga’s Tapping Into Her Italian Roots For Her Next Role as The ‘Black Widow’ Who Killed Maurizio Gucci

Entertainment

Lady Gaga’s Tapping Into Her Italian Roots For Her Next Role as The ‘Black Widow’ Who Killed Maurizio Gucci

Little monsters rejoice, for a star is being born, again! Lady Gaga’s making her return to the big screen next year. Following her Oscar-worthy performance, the pop-star turned actor, will be part of a new project chronicling the murder of fashion mogul, Maurizio Gucci —the founder of, you guessed it, Gucci. The story is every bit as glamorous as you can imagine, and we have the deets. 

Lady Gaga is starring in a new movie, and this one is a true glamorous murder mystery, if ever there was one.

It was reported over the weekend that Lady Gaga’s making another movie. Her next starring role, following her award-winning performance on A Star is Born, will be in a murder, intrigue and high fashion-filled thriller produced by Ridley Scott. 

Scott’s new project chronicles the murder of Maurizio Gucci, the business man who spearheaded the Italian fashion house in the 80s and early 90s. 

A year after we were piqued and obsessed with the fashion and murder mystery ‘The Assasination of Gianni Versace’, another glam intrigue is in the works. At the perfect intersection between true crime and haute couture, comes the retelling of the infamous murder of the head of Gucci back in 1995. 

Patricia was said to hate her ex so much that she plotted and planned his murder.

Maurizio Gucci famously left his wife Patricia Reggiani for another —younger— woman in the late eighties. And in this particular case, the saying ‘hell hath no fury like a woman scorned’ was proven to be true. Rejected and scorned, Patricia hired a hitman to assassinate her ex-husband —earning her the, kinda glamorous and sombre nickname, “the Black Widow.”

The film will be based on the true crime story written by Sara Gay Forden.

The ex-wife was caught and found guilty. Patricia Reggiani served 18 years in prison, before her release in 2016. Here’s where mother monster comes in; Lady Gaga will be playing the role of the Black Widow in the upcoming film. And while details are being kept tightly hidden, we know that the script was written by Roberto Bentivegna, and was based on Sara Gay Forden’s true crime book, ‘The House of Gucci: A Sensational Story of Murder, Madness, Glamour and Greed,’ which chronicled the events.

Did Patricia murder Gucci because he was marrying his mistress? Or was it because his spending was driving the family to ruin? Or perhaps she didn’t do it at all?

In Sara Gay Forden’s gripping book, she explores whether Patrizia Reggiani murdered her ex-husband, Maurizio Gucci, in 1995 because his spending was wildly out of control, “or was it because her glamorous ex was preparing to marry his mistress, Paola Franchi? Or is there a possibility she didn’t do it at all?”

Maurizio famously had two daughters with Patrizia Reggiani, but he left her for another woman. She’d had a brain tumor removed, and her children blamed it on her actions; the media took a darker view of her during a sensationalized affair, depicting her as a hot blooded woman scorned. She was originally drawn a sentence of 29 years.

If the film follows the re-telling of Sara Gay Forden’s story, we will get a look inside a glamorous family empire that ultimately came crumbling down.

The true crime story details the ascent, eventual collapse, and resurrection of the Gucci dynasty. In Sara Gay Forden’s pages we’re taken behind the scenes of the trial and exposed to the passions, the power, and the vulnerabilities of the greatest fashion family of the time. 

The Gucci movie will be produced by Ridley Scott and his wife Giannina.

Scott will produce the Gucci saga with his wife, the Puerto Rican actress, Giannina Scott. He most recently directed “All the Money in the World” about the Getty kidnaping. Scott has been nominated for a directing Academy Award for “Thelma & Louise,” “Gladiator” and “Black Hawk Down” and for a Best Picture Oscar for “The Martian.”

It is said that the film has been in developmental hell for the past decade, at one point even signing on Angelina Jolie for the role of Patricia Reggiani. But finally it looks like the project is coming together, and Scott will put our lord and saviour Stefani Germanotta’s Italian roots to good use in her role as the ‘Black Widow’, Patricia Regianni. 

It’s 2019 And Hollywood Finally Awarded An Oscar To A Native American For The First Time

Entertainment

It’s 2019 And Hollywood Finally Awarded An Oscar To A Native American For The First Time

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In 1973, Marlon Brando famously declined his Oscar for his role in “The Godfather,” to take a stance against Hollywood’s treatment of Native Americans. Actor and activist, Sacheen Littlefeather famously went on stage to refuse the award on Brando’s behalf at the ceremony. It’s only taken a mere 46 years since that day, but this year, a Native American actor finally received the recognition he deserves and was awarded an Oscar for his talent. 

Hollywood’s complicated relationship with Native Americans goes back to the industry’s earliest movies set in the Wild West.

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Sacheen Littlefeather respectfully declining an Oscar on behalf of Marlon Brando, 1973. He was nominated for his role in The Godfather. He declined the award because of the unfair treatment of Native Americans in the film industry. Sacheen, president of the National Native American Affirmative Image Committee, was sent in his place to adress the problems going on, why Brando declined the award and delivered a beautiful speech. Marlon Brando: “I don’t think that people generally realise what the motion picture industry has done to the American Indian, as a matter of fact, all ethnic groups, all minorities, all non-whites. And people just simply don’t realise, just take it for granted that that’s the way people are going to be presented and these clichés are just, I mean on this network every night, well perhaps not every night, but you can see silly renditions of human behaviour, the leering Filipino houseboy, the wily Japanese, the kook or the gook, black man, stupid Indian. It just goes on and on. And people actually don’t realise how deeply people are injured by seeing themselves represented, not so much the adults, who are already injured to that kind of pain and pressure, but children. Indian children seeing Indians represented as savage, ugly, as nasty, viscous, treacherous, drunken. They grow up only with a negative image of themselves and it lasts a lifetime.”

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Nearly 50 years ago, Marlon Brando decided to make good use of his privileged position to decline the Academy Award as a way to protest the mistreatment of Native American actors in the film industry. When Sacheen Littlefeather came to deliver the speech, she told the listeners of the program about the racially-based aggression she experienced including how actor John Wayne was held back by security because he was outraged by Littlefeather. 

It only took Hollywood nearly 50 years, but this weekend, the Academy finally recognized the first Native American actor with an award.

Credit: siouxpergirl92 / Instagram

During Sunday’s Governors Awards, a special ceremony that hands out honorary Oscars for lifetime achievement and humanitarian causes, the Native American actor and Vietnam war veteran was given an honorary award for career achievement. 

Wes Studi’s career has spanned nearly 30 years and it hasn’t always been easy.

Credit: united_historians / Instagram

Studi, a Vietnam War veteran who was an advocate for Native American issues before he pursued a career as an actor, first appeared in a small role in Kevin Costner’s “Dances With Wolves,” but made a searing impression as the villain Magua in Michael Mann’s 1992 epic “The Last of the Mohicans.” His casting as the leading character in Walter Hill’s “Geronimo: An American Legend” (1993) was a milestone for Hollywood —some studios at the time demanded that Hill cast a white actor in the lead role. 

Though Studi was featured in many films, he had never been nominated for an award over the course of his career.

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Though Studi has featured in many projects centered on Native American history (“Into the West,” “The New World,” “Hostiles”), he has also been one of Hollywood’s most reliable and memorable character actors for a generation, with a varied portfolio of work, including a role as a grizzled cop in “Heat” (1995), a mysterious superhero in “Mystery Men” (1999), and an alien patriarch in “Avatar” (2009). Studi, who this weekend became the first Native American actor to win an Oscar, had never even been nominated over the course of his long career. 

Christian Bale, who presented Studi with the award, put a finer point on the issue and called out all the people in the room.

“Too few opportunities in film have gone to Native or indigenous artists, and we’re a room full of people who can change that,” said Christian Bale, Studi’s Hostiles co-star, who presented him with the Oscar. “I’d simply like to say, it’s about time,” said Studi, who delivered much of his speech in Cherokee. “It’s been a wild and wonderful ride, and I’m really proud to be here tonight as the first indigenous Native American to receive an Academy Award. It’s a humbling honor to receive an award for something I love to do.”

The Governor Awards were ideated as a standalone ceremony —separate from the Oscars, to create a free space for winners and presenters to speak and be celebrated with no time restraints.

Credit: www.oscars.org

The honorary Oscar used to be given out as part of the main ceremony. It was a stately portion of the broadcast that required a long introduction, a grand video montage of the honoree’s work, and usually a rambling speech from the winner. In 2009, concerns about long-running times led to the creation of the Governors Awards, a non-televised ceremony held at the Grand Ballroom of the Hollywood and Highland Center.

Taking the special awards out of the hugely televised ceremony —and the hands of aggrieved network-TV executives— has actually been a benefit for the Oscars, lending the Governors Awards their own atmosphere of genuine acclaim where the winners and presenters can speak a little more candidly and without commercially motivated time restrictions.

Meanwhile, fellow honorees Lina Wertmüller and Geena Davis called for gender parity in Hollywood.

Credit: www.oscars.org

“She would like to change the Oscar to a feminine name,” Isabella Rossellini said, translating Italian director Lina Wertmüller’s acceptance speech for her honorary Oscar. “She would like to call it ‘Anna.’ Women in the room, please scream, ‘We want Anna, a female Oscar!’”

Wertmüller’s speech was the capstone of a night devoted to upending some of Hollywood’s most exclusionary traditions and celebrating some of its outsiders. Not only was Studi the first Native American to be recognized by the Academy, but Lina Wertmüller became the first woman ever to receive a best director Oscar nomination when she was recognized for 1976’s Seven Beauties.

“How do you correct centuries of patriarchal domination?” the screenwriter, producer, and director, Jane Campion asked. “It started with Lina Wertmüller.” 

Credit: @ScottFeinberg / Twitter

Campion, together with Little Women director Greta Gerwig, spoke on the history of women nominated for best director by the Academy. “It’s a very short history, more of a haiku,” Campion said, noting that 350 men have been nominated for best director, versus five for women —including herself and Gerwig, who called Wertmüller “a godmother to us all.”

‘Thelma and Louise’ star Geena Davis called out the industry on the very few opportunities of empowerment given to women.

Credit: www.oscars.org

Also during the black-tie dinner, Geena Davis, became the 39th recipient of the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award, which celebrates “outstanding contributions to humanitarian causes” for building upon her acting career in films like “The Accidental Tourist,” “Beetlejuice,” “Thelma & Louise,” and “A League of Their Own” to become an advocate for gender equality in media.

Davis delivered a version of the gender-parity pitch she has made in recent years, speaking this time to the industry group gathered in the Dolby Ballroom. “Thelma and Louise made me realize how few opportunities we give women to come out of a movie feeling excited and empowered by the female characters,” Davis said. “The message we are sending is that men and boys are far more valuable to us than women and girls. Whatever you’re working on right now, boost the number of female characters…and then, cast me!”

Each year there is a lot of debate over who should receive these Honorary Oscars, as well as the Hersholt and the Irving J. Thalberg Memorial Award (which was not given this year). Governors come prepared to the meeting to advocate for their choices and a well-researched and delivered presentation can make a big difference. Afterward, candidates must receive a certain threshold of votes. No matter the process, one can’t argue that the achievements of this group of filmmakers meet the criteria of what appeared to be the prevailing sentiment at the Governors Awards—that the event was a chance to right past wrongs, to fill in the many gaps of Academy history, and all we can say is; at long last.

READ: “Roma” Wins Three Oscars At The 2019 Academy Awards