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A Brazilian Microbrewer Has Crafted Beer From An Ingredient You’d Never Expect

Zen Sasaki / Flickr / Quinn Dombrowski/ Flickr

The standard ingredients needed to make beer are yeast, hops, water, and barley. Craft beer companies all over the world experiment with recipes in hopes of brewing something that will stand out among all the rest.

In Brazil, some brewers are experimenting with less-traditional ingredients…

#studiobocabello #bonsai #blackpine #bonsaibrasil #kuromatsu #pinheironegro

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In the city of Jundai, Brazil, there’s a small brewery called Heroica where they literally go out on a limb to add an original ingredient — bonsai trees! Acquired from a bonsai master, the pruned trimmings are worth more than $20,000!

You’ve heard of bonsai trees…

Cowboy Bebop / Madman Entertainment

With origins that go back to ancient China, the art form we know best is actually more Japanese Zen Buddhist inspired. The word “bonsai” just translates to “planted in a container.” We are most familiar with the small versions of these trees, but they actually grow much larger in the wild. Most bonsais are are trimmed and kept miniature to simulate realistic representations of nature.

But why make beer out of it?

Movieclips / Youtube

According to Vice’s MunchiesRenato Bocabello, a bonsai master living in Brazil, came up with the idea when he saw his brother-in-law, Lucas Domingues, experimenting with a home-brewing kit. “I noticed some similarity to many resinous hop flavors … in some IPAs, and we wondered how a beer made with the bonsai pine branches would taste,” he said. And just like that, Kuromatsu Kamikaze IPA was born.

Finally, an art form you can drink!

WWE / YouTube

Heroica’s Kuromatsu Kamikaze is proof that art and alcohol go together like a landscaping and whatever tío was sipping before he fell asleep on the riding lawnmower. This Brazilian beverage even has me hoping that someday I’ll get to drink a beer made from what my brother-in-law gives me — chest pains. Brother-in-laws, am I right?

[H/T] MUNCHIES – This Brazilian Brewer Is Making Beer Out of $20,000 Bonsai Trees

READ: If You’re On The Fence About Working Out Your Forearms You Might Find This Helpful

Leave a comment if you do something weird with garden clippings OR tag a “microbrewer” whose batch is good because of a special ingredient. Share by tapping the share button below!

Celebrities Like Camila Cabello Are Calling For People To Pay Attention To What’s Happening In The Amazon

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Celebrities Like Camila Cabello Are Calling For People To Pay Attention To What’s Happening In The Amazon

If you haven’t already heard about it, Brazil’s Amazon rain forest is currently being ravaged by devastating large-scale wild-fires. According to recent reports and the country’s National Institute for Space Research, there has been a 77% increase in the number of fires burning in the area this year. No doubt, this large scale destruction is because of climate change. Done with being quiet, celebrities have been attempting to raise awareness of the destruction of the rainforest and its beautiful ecosystems through the hashtag #PrayForAmazonia.

The hashtag was created by environmentalist Nick Rose Dertsas, and hopefully, it will catch on quickly.

The environmentalist expressed his outrage over the lack of media coverage over the tragedy in a post to Instagram.

iamnickrose / Instagram

“Terrifying to think that the Amazon is the largest rain forest on the planet, creating 20% of the earth’s oxygen, basically the lungs of the world, has been on fire and burning for the last 16 days running, with literally NO media coverage whatsoever! Why? @unitednations who is running your page? Influences??? Where are you when it actually matters?????
@cnn @bbc @guardian @forbes#deforestation #climatechangePLEASE REPOST,” he wrote.

Camila Cabello caught wind of the post after it was retweeted by actor Leonardo DiCaprio.

camila_cabello / Instagram

“This is heartbreaking and terrifying 💔💔💔 ‪This makes me want to cry with frustration. what are we DOING? We’re literally destroying our miracle of a home 😭😭😭 I’m so sorry, earth 💔💔💔‬#AmazonRainforest#Repost@leonardodicaprio with @get_repost
・・・
#Regram#RG@IamNickRose: Terrifying to think that the Amazon is the largest rain forest on the planet, creating 20% of the earth’s oxygen, basically the lungs of the world, has been on fire and burning for the last 16 days running, with literally NO media coverage whatsoever! Why?” Cabello wrote in her repost.

Cabello’s former girl group mate also shared the post.

laurenjauregui / Instagram

“Although I’ll admit prayer helps me breathe most days,
It can’t quite do the same job the Amazon in Brazil does for the human populace (not to mention all the life forms on this planet that also need oxygen to survive.) The Amazon has been burning for the past almost 3 weeks with little to no media coverage. The Amazon is responsible for 20% of our oxygen. Gaia is screaming. We are truly so disrespectful to our children, and our grandchildren, and their children. Awareness is one thing but I truly wanna know when we’re all going to wake up and feel the poison in our lungs. 
I honor mama Gaia today and pray for our collective healing and growth towards understanding that this is our only home. We borrow it from our children, and the mess we have made on it is so carelessly destructive. All in the name of the almighty dollar. It alarms me that so many in possession of power on this planet truly do not care about or even believe in the crisis we face. It pains me that they continue to deny, suppress truth and spew out false information. To roll back policies that protect our environment and native people’s rights all while profiting off the lands and people they continue to destroy. What is happening in the Amazon, what is happening in Hawaii, is all connected. We should all be paying very close attention to the way our chosen leaders treat the planet we live on and only have one of. We should be very very aware during election season so closely upon us, but we should also be figuring out ways to be conscious of our environment and our interaction with it every day. My heart hurts for all the animals whose homes have been destroyed, for all of the indigenous peoples who have been affected by the loss of this land, for all of the unique plant life and beauty that we have just lost as a collective family on this planet. Offering up all the healing energy I can muster. ❤️🙏🏼✨” Jauregui wrote in a post about the fires.

https://www.instagram.com/laurenjauregui/?utm_source=ig_embed

Songstress Ellie Golding also posted about the fires.

“There was worldwide outcry when Notre Dame was on fire,” she wrote highlighting the way so many were quick to pour funding, tears and support for the building of the Catholic structure in Europe. Her post highlights how little care there is not only for the environment but also for institutions in Latin America.

Today he president of Brazil announced that the government would not have enough funding to fight the fires.

Here’s hoping our world leaders and institutions will reach out to Brazil and offer the same help that they did just a few months ago when Notre Dame was under fire.

Indigenous Women Of Brazil Are Refusing To Keep Quiet Over The Country’s President’s Policies

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Indigenous Women Of Brazil Are Refusing To Keep Quiet Over The Country’s President’s Policies

Last week, hundreds of Indigenous women took to the streets to protest against the policies of Brazil’s far-right President Jair Bolsonaro. According to BBC, indigenous women occupied the building of Brazil’s health ministry in the capital of Brasília and demanded better healthcare for the Indigenous people of the country and called for an end to the destruction of the Amazon. 

It has been reported that about 300 Indigenous women condemned the proposed changes to women’s healthcare and deforestation in Brazil in a peaceful demonstration that lasted over 10 hours. 

The Indigenous women of the country were protesting, according to a tweet by AJ+,  “rollbacks on Indigenous rights and efforts to open up Indigenous lands to minding and agriculture.” AJ+ shared powerful images of Indigenous women coming together to fight for their rights and to “cry out for help.” 

Under the far-right president Bolsonaro, Brazil has backtracked on rights and protections for the Indigenous community. For example, Brazil has let “agriculture ministry make decisions about Indigenous land, blocked any new reservations, [and] proposed to close specialized Indigenous health care offices.” 

“We’ve been left abandoned,” 43-year-old Teresa Cristina Kezonazokere told Correio Braziliense newspaper (in Portuguese, according to BBC). “They treat Indigenous people like animals.”

According to The Associated Press, Bolsonaro’s administration—since taking office in January—has continuously “clashed with environmentalists and others over possibly opening up the Amazon rainforest to development and agribusiness.”

The president wants to open their lands to agriculture and mining. The Globe Post also reports that President Bolsonaro has been warned by experts and activists about such policies that will have “devastating environmental impacts, particularly in worsening climate change.”

However, Bolsonaro continues to dismiss the facts and data showing that the effects of his policies will affect Indigenous land. “Bolsonaro has dismissed the data as lies and sacked the head of the government agency tasked with tracking tree clearing,” The Globe Post reports. 

Further, Brazil’s government wants to make towns and cities responsible for providing medical services to its Indigenous people—putting the pressure on community leaders and local officials. But community leaders fear that their communities lack the “infrastructure” to do this. According to BBC, the federal government is currently in charge of these responsibilities.

Tamikua Faustino of the Pataxó tribe told the AP that “if we don’t stick together, in the near future we’ll be eliminated.”

This surge in deforestation that occurs on Indigenous reserves would essentially eliminate Indigenous folks from the places they inhabit.

In an AJ+ video shared on Twitter, articulation of the Indigenous people of Brazil Sonia Guajajara said: “We will resist because we’ve been here for five centuries and we have a good experience in resisting.” The Indigenous community is being backed by thousands of community members and supports in fighting back against President Bolsonaro’s government.

When Indigenous folks took the streets of Brazil to protest, they didn’t hold back. Many did so carrying bows, arrows, and spears, and the Indigenous women advanced on Congress in Brasilia carrying a large banner that read: “Resist to exist.” Women leading the frontlines are demanding the protection of their land. 

A couple of days after the initial demonstration took place, about 1,500 indigenous women from 110 ethnic groups were expected to join a protest to defend their rights that are under threat under the Bolsonaro administration.

According to BBC, the president has “promised to integrate Indigenous people into the rest of the population and repeatedly questioned the existence of their protected reserves, which are rights guaranteed in the country’s constitution.” The president who favors development over conservation of Indigenous land and reservations has also said that the Indigenous territories are “too big in relation to the number of people who live there,” therefore making it okay to open land that does not belong to him, to agriculture, minding, and essentially destruction. 

Earlier this month, The Globe Post published an opinion piece highlighting the ways in which Bolsonaro and his presidency were destroying the Brazilian Amazon.   

According to data, deforestation in the Amazon region has skyrocketed and there’s no turning back. In June 2019, deforestation showed to be 88 percent higher than the levels of deforestation seen in June 2018. And in the first half of July 2019, it was 68 percent higher than the entire month of the previous year. 

It’s important to note that more than 800,000 Indigenous people live in 450 Indigenous territories across Brazil and most are located in the Amazon region and some communities live totally isolated. 

But the Indigenous women of Brazil are not backing down. In a video posted by AJ+ on Twitter, one of the women can be seen saying that they’re going to defend nature and defend the forest. “We are defending our children’s lives, but also the lives of the people on the other side of the world,” she adds. “Because the air we breathe is the air you breathe.”

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